Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLos Angeles County Labor
IN THE NEWS

Los Angeles County Labor

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
May 26, 1992 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
The recent devastating rebellion--or riots, as most called it--in southern Los Angeles should force the entire country to take a new look at an old but much needed, rational concept loosely known as "industrial policy." President Bush doesn't like it, complaining that it smacks of socialism.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 5, 2002 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reyna Lavariega's parents were too poor to buy a pencil or a notebook. That's why they never sent her to school. As a young adult, she cobbled together as much education as she could in Oaxaca, Mexico. Still, she was barely able to read and write when she joined her husband in Los Angeles 12 years ago. Now Lavariega washes broken stoves and refrigerators for the family appliance repair business, which is run out of the basement of her rented home near MacArthur Park.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1998 | JENNIFER PENDLETON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Telecommuting centers in Lancaster and Santa Clarita, which soared in popularity after the Northridge earthquake, are still operating nearly five years later. But for how long? Although both are holding their own today, the centers' backers are questioning their long-term future because of changing work patterns in Southern California. It was only a few years ago that workplace pundits hailed telecommuting as an idea whose time had come.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2001 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many Southern California cities that barred day laborers from seeking work on public property have been retooling their rules in the months since a federal court ruling declared such bans a violation of free speech. Some, such as Cypress, Lawndale and Lake Forest, are halting enforcement of their ordinances, at least for now. Los Angeles County, whose ordinance was ruled unconstitutional by the federal court last September, also has stopped enforcing the law.
NEWS
September 29, 2000 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is half the world on strike, about to strike or coming off a strike? In Los Angeles, where janitors, librarians, teachers, bus drivers and actors have appeared downright eager to carry picket signs, it sure feels that way. Labor strife is becoming the great unifier, cutting across lines of class, race and ethnicity, drawing equal passions from workers in the public and private sectors, from professionals and unskilled laborers alike.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leading health plan being debated in Congress places a far weaker safety net under workers in Southern California than in other areas because it exempts the small businesses that account for an unusually large segment of the region's employment. The reform proposal crafted by Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) and endorsed by President Clinton exempts firms with fewer than 25 workers permanently from any future mandates requiring businesses to help pay for health benefits.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leading health plan being debated in Congress places a far weaker safety net under workers in Southern California than in other areas because it exempts the small businesses that account for an unusually large segment of the region's employment. The reform proposal crafted by Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) and endorsed by President Clinton exempts firms with fewer than 25 workers permanently from any future mandates requiring businesses to help pay for health benefits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1991 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They abandoned the street corner hiring sites of the east San Fernando Valley a year ago, tired of the dangers and indignities: unscrupulous employers, hostile merchants, suspicious police, fellow job-hunters desperate enough to fight for a day's work. Roberto Arias and his friends at a city-sponsored day labor site in North Hollywood are still struggling to survive. There are still too many men and not enough jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1989 | RON RUSSELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early each day, Ruben Ibarra embarks on a two-hour trip from his apartment in downtown Los Angeles to Topanga, in the Santa Monica Mountains above Malibu, hoping to find work. He rides an RTD bus along Pacific Coast Highway and then hitchhikes four miles inland in a routine that the 29-year-old Mexican immigrant has followed since his arrival in this country seven years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1992 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Palmdale carpenter Bruce Davis once pitied the desperate crowds of immigrants on street corners who were willing to haul bricks or pound nails at the booming tract developments of the Antelope Valley for next to nothing. For every truck that pulled over in search of a few strong hands, mobs of men would swarm, begging for a chance to work at $5 an hour. The unlucky would be left on the sidewalk in the hot sun.
NEWS
September 29, 2000 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is half the world on strike, about to strike or coming off a strike? In Los Angeles, where janitors, librarians, teachers, bus drivers and actors have appeared downright eager to carry picket signs, it sure feels that way. Labor strife is becoming the great unifier, cutting across lines of class, race and ethnicity, drawing equal passions from workers in the public and private sectors, from professionals and unskilled laborers alike.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2000 | James Flanigan
One of the unheralded benefits of Southern California becoming the trade crossroads of the world is that it offers hundreds of local unskilled workers a chance at really good job training. More than $3.6 billion worth of rail construction projects are now being built in Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties, with good jobs for construction workers, economic benefits for the region--and an innovation. The innovation is training.
NEWS
September 6, 1999 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Californians are moving in and out of jobs at a rapid pace, and a surprisingly small fraction of workers holds a traditional daytime job away from home, according to a study that shows how the new economy is dramatically changing the nature of work. Four out of 10 workers have been at their jobs for less than three years, the study says, reflecting a high degree of churning in a booming, high-tech economy that continues to displace many workers while even more are being hired.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1998 | JENNIFER PENDLETON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Telecommuting centers in Lancaster and Santa Clarita, which soared in popularity after the Northridge earthquake, are still operating nearly five years later. But for how long? Although both are holding their own today, the centers' backers are questioning their long-term future because of changing work patterns in Southern California. It was only a few years ago that workplace pundits hailed telecommuting as an idea whose time had come.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leading health plan being debated in Congress places a far weaker safety net under workers in Southern California than in other areas because it exempts the small businesses that account for an unusually large segment of the region's employment. The reform proposal crafted by Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) and endorsed by President Clinton exempts firms with fewer than 25 workers permanently from any future mandates requiring businesses to help pay for health benefits.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leading health plan being debated in Congress places a far weaker safety net under workers in Southern California than in other areas because it exempts the small businesses that account for an unusually large segment of the region's employment. The reform proposal crafted by Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) and endorsed by President Clinton exempts firms with fewer than 25 workers permanently from any future mandates requiring businesses to help pay for health benefits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2001 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many Southern California cities that barred day laborers from seeking work on public property have been retooling their rules in the months since a federal court ruling declared such bans a violation of free speech. Some, such as Cypress, Lawndale and Lake Forest, are halting enforcement of their ordinances, at least for now. Los Angeles County, whose ordinance was ruled unconstitutional by the federal court last September, also has stopped enforcing the law.
NEWS
February 5, 2002 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reyna Lavariega's parents were too poor to buy a pencil or a notebook. That's why they never sent her to school. As a young adult, she cobbled together as much education as she could in Oaxaca, Mexico. Still, she was barely able to read and write when she joined her husband in Los Angeles 12 years ago. Now Lavariega washes broken stoves and refrigerators for the family appliance repair business, which is run out of the basement of her rented home near MacArthur Park.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1994 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For all the shock, it is a blue-collar lament heard many times before: A once-bustling factory shuts its doors and a swarm of jobless workers hits the streets. But if each shutdown is its own tale of agony, the impending death of Alcoa's 56-year-old Vernon Works plant, near Downtown Los Angeles, is extraordinary nonetheless. Because in the dreary litany of plant shutdowns in Southern California, it appears that this one factory might have stayed open--the jobs saved and the anguish avoided.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1993 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One consolation for Orange County during these tough economic times has been that things are usually worse in Los Angeles County. However, that may be changing. A survey of average wages for secretaries, clerks and typists indicates that pay in Orange County fell behind that of its neighbor to the north, reversing a trend of higher pay rates for office workers here. Wages dropped 2.6% in Orange County and increased a modest 1.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|