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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1990 | Times researcher Cecilia Rasmussen from staff reports
Los Angeles AIDS kit--In efforts to contain the spread of AIDS, this policy sets aside $25,000 to help in the distribution of 60,000 AIDS prevention kits by five drug abuse agencies. Each kit contains a bottle of bleach for sterilizing needles, one or more condoms and an informational flyer about AIDS. Approved in October. Ammunition sales--A one-week ban on ammunition attempts to curtail the random firing of guns into the air on New Year's Eve and the Fourth of July. Approved in May. Animal sacrifice--Los Angeles became the first city in the nation to ban animal sacrifices under any circumstances, including during religious rituals, by imposing penalties of up to six months in jail and fines of up to $1,000.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN
Police, school and court officials Monday praised a new anti-truancy law, saying it can be credited for increasing school attendance and reducing daytime crime. "It's probably one of the best programs I've seen as far as getting students back in school," said David Searcy, a juvenile court supervisor who has been watching the results of the ordinance.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1989
Last year, local and municipal governments approved many new laws and regulations that will affect many residents throughout the region. In Los Angeles County, owners of biting dogs will pay more in fines, while city residents will feel a pinch in the wallet from higher fees for water, sewer and power. Burbank has placed restrictions on metal balloons and the homeless won't be able to sleep in West Hollywood parks overnight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1994 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County Counsel DeWitt Clinton, in a brief but definitive opinion, told the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday that it would be illegal to allow needle exchange programs for drug abusers under any circumstances. Clinton's opinion appeared to dash, for the moment, the hopes of several board members who favor needle exchange programs to reduce the spread of AIDS among intravenous drug abusers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1994 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County Counsel DeWitt Clinton, in a brief but definitive opinion, told the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday that it would be illegal to allow needle exchange programs for drug abusers under any circumstances. Clinton's opinion appeared to dash, for the moment, the hopes of several board members who favor needle exchange programs to reduce the spread of AIDS among intravenous drug abusers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1988
Former Los Angeles County Supervisor Baxter Ward, campaigning to regain his old post in the June 7 primary, on Wednesday accused county transportation officials of violating a voter-approved law by building light-rail systems such as the the Los Angeles-Long Beach and Century Freeway lines under construction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1991
A Superior Court judge on Thursday ordered a prostitute to three years' probation and nine months in a residential jail for her guilty plea to working the streets while knowingly infected with the virus that causes AIDS. Patricia Sweeting was the first woman and third person to be charged in Los Angeles County under a 1988 law making it a felony to practicing prostitution after testing positive for the HIV virus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1991 | RICHARD SIMON and AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With a new liberal majority in power, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors is expected to approve Tuesday the distribution of bleach kits and condoms to fight the spread of AIDS--four years after the preventive measures first were proposed here and years after similar programs were established in New York and San Francisco.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN
Police, school and court officials Monday praised a new anti-truancy law, saying it can be credited for increasing school attendance and reducing daytime crime. "It's probably one of the best programs I've seen as far as getting students back in school," said David Searcy, a juvenile court supervisor who has been watching the results of the ordinance.
NEWS
August 23, 1990 | JOHN NEEDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lifeguard with the pistol on his hip and the handcuffs on his belt slammed his Jeep to a shuddering stop and peered into the 9 p.m. darkness. He bolted out the door and crouched five feet from his prey. "Get out of there now, you . . . " lifeguard Rick Reisenhofer screamed at the man. "If you don't crawl out of there in 10 seconds, I'm gonna kill you." The man crawled out from the brush behind lifeguard headquarters. How did Reisenhofer see his man in the dark?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1991
A Superior Court judge on Thursday ordered a prostitute to three years' probation and nine months in a residential jail for her guilty plea to working the streets while knowingly infected with the virus that causes AIDS. Patricia Sweeting was the first woman and third person to be charged in Los Angeles County under a 1988 law making it a felony to practicing prostitution after testing positive for the HIV virus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1991 | RICHARD SIMON and AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With a new liberal majority in power, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors is expected to approve Tuesday the distribution of bleach kits and condoms to fight the spread of AIDS--four years after the preventive measures first were proposed here and years after similar programs were established in New York and San Francisco.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1990 | Times researcher Cecilia Rasmussen from staff reports
Los Angeles AIDS kit--In efforts to contain the spread of AIDS, this policy sets aside $25,000 to help in the distribution of 60,000 AIDS prevention kits by five drug abuse agencies. Each kit contains a bottle of bleach for sterilizing needles, one or more condoms and an informational flyer about AIDS. Approved in October. Ammunition sales--A one-week ban on ammunition attempts to curtail the random firing of guns into the air on New Year's Eve and the Fourth of July. Approved in May. Animal sacrifice--Los Angeles became the first city in the nation to ban animal sacrifices under any circumstances, including during religious rituals, by imposing penalties of up to six months in jail and fines of up to $1,000.
NEWS
August 23, 1990 | JOHN NEEDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lifeguard with the pistol on his hip and the handcuffs on his belt slammed his Jeep to a shuddering stop and peered into the 9 p.m. darkness. He bolted out the door and crouched five feet from his prey. "Get out of there now, you . . . " lifeguard Rick Reisenhofer screamed at the man. "If you don't crawl out of there in 10 seconds, I'm gonna kill you." The man crawled out from the brush behind lifeguard headquarters. How did Reisenhofer see his man in the dark?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1990 | Times researcher Cecilia Rasmussen from staff reports
In 1989, fears and tragedies shaped new laws. Swept up in the horror over the killing of children on a Stockton schoolyard, Los Angeles and Compton mounted a campaign against assault guns. Acting on public fears of brush fires, the Los Angeles City Council banned wood shake roofs, and the county Board of Supervisors required roofs to be fire-retardant. Here is a sampling of laws passed by local legislative bodies in 1989.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1988
Former Los Angeles County Supervisor Baxter Ward, campaigning to regain his old post in the June 7 primary, on Wednesday accused county transportation officials of violating a voter-approved law by building light-rail systems such as the the Los Angeles-Long Beach and Century Freeway lines under construction.
NEWS
February 18, 1993
More than 50 residents turned out for a special City Council meeting Tuesday to protest the council's plan to enact a temporary law restricting new construction. The law would replace a building moratorium that expires next month. The council is in the final stages of a page-by-page review of a new law that it is rushing to put into effect by the time the moratorium expires March 25. The moratorium was passed two years ago when the city incorporated.
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