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Los Angeles County Milk Commission

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1989 | RICHARD SIMON, Times Staff Writer
The obscure Los Angeles County Milk Commission, which regulates the production, distribution and sale of raw milk, is about to lose its low profile and possibly its job. A report due to come before the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday says the commission has been more of an advocate than a watchdog for the lone company it regulates--Stueve Brothers Farms, a Chino dairy in neighboring San Bernardino County.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1990 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stronger controls for Los Angeles County's obscure Milk Commission were rejected by the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday, despite allegations that the panel is a captive of the single raw milk producer it regulates. Supervisors voted down an ordinance that would have established standards, including conflict-of-interest rules, for the commission, whose sole mission is to oversee the production, distribution and sale of raw milk.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1990 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stronger controls for Los Angeles County's obscure Milk Commission were rejected by the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday, despite allegations that the panel is a captive of the single raw milk producer it regulates. Supervisors voted down an ordinance that would have established standards, including conflict-of-interest rules, for the commission, whose sole mission is to oversee the production, distribution and sale of raw milk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1989 | RICHARD SIMON, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County's obscure Milk Commission will remain in business, despite charges that it is a captive of the lone company it regulates, the Board of Supervisors decided Tuesday. Supervisors rejected a recommendation by the county's chief administrative officer to do away with the commission, whose sole mission is to oversee the production, distribution and sale of raw milk. Chief Administrative Officer Richard B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1989 | RICHARD SIMON, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County's obscure Milk Commission will remain in business, despite charges that it is a captive of the lone company it regulates, the Board of Supervisors decided Tuesday. Supervisors rejected a recommendation by the county's chief administrative officer to do away with the commission, whose sole mission is to oversee the production, distribution and sale of raw milk. Chief Administrative Officer Richard B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1998 | EDWARD M. YOON
The California Department of Health Services Friday issued a statewide remove-from-sale order of a certain brand of unpasteurized milk product that may be contaminated with salmonella.
NEWS
April 11, 1989 | DAN MORAIN and DANIEL P. PUZO, Times Staff Writers
Alta-Dena Certified Dairy has run a 35-year campaign of "misleading and sometimes downright dangerous" advertising about the health benefits of raw milk and must place warnings on such products for the next 10 years, a Superior Court judge ruled Monday. After a 54-day trial in a false advertising suit, Alameda County Superior Court Judge John Sutter also ordered that Alta-Dena, the nation's largest raw milk producer, stop using its motto, "The Dairy That Cares About Your Health, Naturally."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1989 | VICTOR MERINA, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles County Milk Commission is a little-known panel with an obscure mission: regulating the production, distribution and sale of raw or unpasteurized milk. Its commissioners are paid $25 per meeting, but what has been a low-profile job turned public this week when a Northern California judge accused the six-member county panel of kowtowing to the lone company it regulates--Alta-Dena Certified Dairy. In strongly worded ruling against Alta-Dena, the nation's largest raw milk producer, Alameda County Superior Court Judge John Sutter claimed the company has run a "misleading and sometimes downright dangerous" advertising campaign touting the health benefits of unpasteurized milk.
NEWS
December 5, 1988 | AMY STEVENS, Times Staff Writer
To believers, raw cow's milk is the next best thing to mother's own. They boast about its taste and claim that it cures illness. They scoff at people who insist on drinking milk that has been "blasted with heat"--meaning pasteurized. Now that many cattle diseases have been eliminated, they say, pasteurization is unnecessary. To critics, raw milk is deceptively dangerous stuff.
FOOD
August 2, 2000 | EMILY GREEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"When I am right, and really, truly right, I stand up for it," says 82-year-old Harold J.J. Stueve. For the last 47 years, the founder of Alta-Dena Dairy has believed himself really, truly right about raw milk. He has defeated two attempts in the state Legislature to ban it. He has gone to Washington, D.C., to defend it. He has imported the world's expert on listeria from Germany to advise him. As for the cost, he has no idea how much he's spent. "Millions," he says, shrugging.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1989 | RICHARD SIMON, Times Staff Writer
The obscure Los Angeles County Milk Commission, which regulates the production, distribution and sale of raw milk, is about to lose its low profile and possibly its job. A report due to come before the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday says the commission has been more of an advocate than a watchdog for the lone company it regulates--Stueve Brothers Farms, a Chino dairy in neighboring San Bernardino County.
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