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Los Angeles County Natural History Museum

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1994 | JON NALICK
Inside a 60-foot trailer decorated to resemble a typical Southern California canyon, Liz Lamarre, 12, plunged her plastic trowel into a small plot of earth and began looking for historic artifacts. After rooting around unsuccessfully for a few moments, she cried out, "Oh, I did find something!" and pulled out an abalone shell. Liz was one of about 30 students at Frank N.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2011 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
A 63-foot-long fin whale, one of the biggest skeletons owned by the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, will become its public greeter, the museum announced Tuesday, in a new brightly lit glass entrance pavilion made possible by a $13-million gift. "It's a major statement. It's beckoning and saying, 'Come in and see who we are,'" said Jane Pisano, the museum's president. The Otis Booth Pavilion, named for the successful investor and former Los Angeles Times executive who was one of the museum's most influential funders and board members before his death in 2008, will replace what Pisano described as an "ugly, dark, barricading" array of steps and walls that had faced Exposition Boulevard.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1997 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The case of downtown's missing skull was solved Tuesday when the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County announced that its collection has long included the cranium--and several other bones--found 40 years ago at what is now the proposed site of a Roman Catholic cathedral. Native American leaders said that the solution of the mystery reinforces their belief that the property at Temple and Hill streets in downtown Los Angeles might contain an ancient cemetery of their ancestors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1997 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The case of downtown's missing skull was solved Tuesday when the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County announced that its collection has long included the cranium--and several other bones--found 40 years ago at what is now the proposed site of a Roman Catholic cathedral. Native American leaders said that the solution of the mystery reinforces their belief that the property at Temple and Hill streets in downtown Los Angeles might contain an ancient cemetery of their ancestors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1997 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The case of downtown's missing skull was solved Tuesday when the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County announced that its collection has long included the cranium--and several other bones--found 40 years ago at what is now the proposed site of a Roman Catholic cathedral. Native American leaders said that the solution of the mystery reinforces their belief that the property at Temple and Hill streets in downtown Los Angeles might contain an ancient cemetery of their ancestors.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History has lost its eligibility to apply for new federal support from the National Science Foundation in a dispute over more than $250,000 in grant money the government contends may have been misspent. The science foundation has relaxed the ban on new grant funding in one instance in the last few weeks, but the situation is somewhat ironic since Craig C.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2011 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
A 63-foot-long fin whale, one of the biggest skeletons owned by the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, will become its public greeter, the museum announced Tuesday, in a new brightly lit glass entrance pavilion made possible by a $13-million gift. "It's a major statement. It's beckoning and saying, 'Come in and see who we are,'" said Jane Pisano, the museum's president. The Otis Booth Pavilion, named for the successful investor and former Los Angeles Times executive who was one of the museum's most influential funders and board members before his death in 2008, will replace what Pisano described as an "ugly, dark, barricading" array of steps and walls that had faced Exposition Boulevard.
NEWS
October 31, 1985
To residents, the great brush fires that periodically sweep across Southern California are destructive and potentially life threatening, but to the chaparral that burns, the flames mean life. The life cycle of the familiar brushy stands covering the mountains around the Los Angeles Basin will be the subject of a permanent Los Angeles County Natural History Museum exhibit, "Chaparral: A Story of Life From Fire," museum officials said Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1994
Science-fiction author Ray Bradbury will speak at 2 p.m. Sunday in the Jean Delacour Auditorium at the Los Angeles County Natural History Museum. A book-signing will follow the lecture. Bradbury is celebrating the 40th anniversary of "Fahrenheit 451," and a special edition of the book will be for sale at the event. The lecture costs $10 for museum members, $15 for non-members and $5 for students with ID. The museum is in Exposition Park at 900 Exposition Blvd. in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA
Burbank city officials and business leaders will hold a fund-raiser Thursday for the proposed Burbank branch of the Los Angeles County Natural History Museum. The event will be held in the rotunda of the Media City Center mall, 201 E. Magnolia Blvd., where photographs and other exhibits of wildlife are on display. Construction is already under way at the $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1997 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The case of downtown's missing skull was solved Tuesday when the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County announced that its collection has long included the cranium--and several other bones--found 40 years ago at what is now the proposed site of a Roman Catholic cathedral. Native American leaders said that the solution of the mystery reinforces their belief that the property at Temple and Hill streets in downtown Los Angeles might contain an ancient cemetery of their ancestors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1994 | JON NALICK
Inside a 60-foot trailer decorated to resemble a typical Southern California canyon, Liz Lamarre, 12, plunged her plastic trowel into a small plot of earth and began looking for historic artifacts. After rooting around unsuccessfully for a few moments, she cried out, "Oh, I did find something!" and pulled out an abalone shell. Liz was one of about 30 students at Frank N.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History has lost its eligibility to apply for new federal support from the National Science Foundation in a dispute over more than $250,000 in grant money the government contends may have been misspent. The science foundation has relaxed the ban on new grant funding in one instance in the last few weeks, but the situation is somewhat ironic since Craig C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2001
Peter B. Feenstra, a former city administrator for Bellflower, South El Monte and Westminster, died Sunday at his home in Bellflower. He was 70. Born in Long Beach, Feenstra was the son of Dutch immigrants who were dairy farmers. After graduating with a degree in education and psychology from Cal State Long Beach, he began a career in city government. In the 1960s, he was assistant city manager of Paramount, leaving in 1965 to become city manager of Artesia.
MAGAZINE
October 7, 2001 | RACHEL KREISEL
You've got to promise not to tell anyone," says Vic. His voice drops to a conspiratorial hush. "There's a fossilized whalebone on Sunset Boulevard in Echo Park." Vic, a local artist (and a fossil in his own right as the son of old-line Lefties), has visions of corporate entrepreneurs transforming his quirky neighborhood into a paleo theme park.
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