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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2007 | Stuart Pfeifer, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca, who already leads the largest sheriff's department in the nation, may soon try to make his agency even bigger. At the request of the county's top administrator, Baca has assigned a team to explore taking over the county Office of Public Safety, a police force that patrols parks, hospitals and government buildings. Although relatively obscure, it is the fourth-largest police department in the county, with more than 460 sworn officers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2007 | Stuart Pfeifer, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca, who already leads the largest sheriff's department in the nation, may soon try to make his agency even bigger. At the request of the county's top administrator, Baca has assigned a team to explore taking over the county Office of Public Safety, a police force that patrols parks, hospitals and government buildings. Although relatively obscure, it is the fourth-largest police department in the county, with more than 460 sworn officers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2009 | Ruben Vives
A jury on Friday voted for the death penalty for a 26-year-old man who was convicted of fatally shooting an off-duty Los Angeles County police captain during an attempted robbery nearly five years ago. "This was a brutal, violent, senseless killing of a veteran police officer, whose life was snuffed out for nothing," said Darren Levine of the deputy district attorney's Crimes Against Police Officers Section. "The jury made the correct call. This defendant has never expressed genuine remorse."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2005 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
Two recent cases in which disturbed patients endangered themselves at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center have highlighted problems with mental health services at the troubled public hospital. Last Friday, a 16-year-old patient ran out of the pediatrics ward, kicked out a glass window in a fifth-floor office and threatened to jump from a building ledge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2004 | Tracy Weber and Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writers
Federal health officials on Wednesday rescinded a threat to pull funding from Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center after the public hospital agreed to limit the use of police officers and Taser stun guns to subdue psychiatric patients. Earlier this month, the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services found that the hospital's mental patients were in "immediate jeopardy" of harm because police were using Tasers and leather restraints to control them.
BOOKS
August 27, 2000 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, Anne-Marie O'Connor is a Times staff writer
It wasn't exactly "Armies of the Night." It was, however, a telling footnote to the just-concluded Democratic National Convention here in Los Angeles. The scene: American literary institution Gore Vidal, facing down dozens of Los Angeles Police Department riot police.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2000 | TERRY McDERMOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looking inside Alma Scott Grieshaber's wallet is like having 1957 hit you smack between the eyes: a cardboard Sears credit card, a paper driver's license, trading stamps, a note reminding her to "wear dress or suit and heels" with the word "heels" underlined, and a $107.37 paycheck for a month's nursing work. One hundred and seven dollars? For a month? Grieshaber's wallet was found last week by construction workers remodeling Los Angeles County's office of public safety in Downey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2000 | TERRY McDERMOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Filling a time capsule is like dancing: If you have to think about what to put in it, or where to put your foot next, you can almost guarantee a clumsy result. That's why the contents of official time capsules can be so dull.
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | JEANNE WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If results of blood tests show that UC Santa Barbara freshman David Attias was under the influence of drugs the night he allegedly ran down five people, killing four, it will serve as another grim reminder that drugs and driving are lethal. Witnesses' accounts of Attias' wild behavior after his speeding Saab slammed into pedestrians on a crowded Isla Vista street Feb. 23 indicate he may have been on drugs.
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