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Los Angeles County Ordinances

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1999 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The complexities of the nationwide movement to require what backers consider a living wage were on full display at the Board of Supervisors' meeting Tuesday, as the region's largest employer wrestled with the question of equity for its thousands of low-wage workers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2000 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL and TINA BORGATTA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For Raul Ovidio Paez and fellow day laborers gathered Friday outside a building-supply store on West Slauson Avenue in Los Angeles, the issue seemed obvious: Why should police chase down job-seekers when there is serious crime to respond to? "We're just looking for jobs; we're not committing any crimes," Paez, a 30-year-old native of El Salvador, said as he and others waited for chamba (work) from passing motorists outside the HomeBase store in Ladera Heights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1998
Calling the county's ordinance restricting curbside laborers a violation of free speech rights, immigrant advocates filed suit in U.S. District Court on Wednesday challenging the law. "Under our Constitution, a day laborer has the same rights to free expression as a businessperson, street musician or political activist," said Thomas A. Saenz, regional counsel at the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, which represents the two plaintiffs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1996
A deadlocked Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors decided by default this week not to place a series of measures on the November ballot that would allow residents of the county's unincorporated areas to vote on recent tax increases. With board members Mike Antonovich and Deane Dana in favor and Zev Yaroslavsky and Gloria Molina abstaining, the board declined to place increases in taxes on utility bills, hotel rooms, amusement park tickets, landfills and waste disposal before the voters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1996 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to allegations of fraud involving controversial developer Marshall Redman, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday agreed to enact sweeping public-interest reforms that will provide buyers of undeveloped land broad new protections.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1995
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors unanimously approved an ordinance Thursday that will make it more difficult to establish businesses that sell pornography near schools and residences. The ordinance, introduced by Supervisor Gloria Molina, prohibits adult-oriented businesses within 250 feet of a residence and within 500 feet of schools or parks. Molina said that although adult businesses have the constitutional right to exist, communities have the right to establish basic standards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1995
After hearing sharp criticism from newspaper and media organizations, the Board of Supervisors postponed action Thursday on a controversial plan to sell Los Angeles County's civil court records in computerized form to private companies that could resell them at a profit to the public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1995
Seeking ways to offset the cost of trials, the County Board of Supervisors approved a proposal Tuesday to change state law and allow counties to charge the media for broadcasting from the courtroom. The board's 3-2 vote was prompted by the ballooning costs of the O.J. Simpson trial, which has cost the county about $5 million so far. Such high-profile trials are profitable for television, said Supervisor Mike Antonovich.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1995 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County Commission on Obscenity and Pornography was saved from extinction Tuesday when the Board of Supervisors voted to extend its life for two more years. Supervisor Mike Antonovich had vowed to save the obscure 15-member group after the county's Audit Department recommended it be disbanded because of lack of activity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1994
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has voted to end the practice of giving six-month pay bonuses to retiring executives, the latest in a series of efforts to scale back the county's unusually generous benefits package. In a unanimous vote, the supervisors agreed to stop paying the bonuses to newly hired department heads and will seek outside legal advice on ways to take the benefit away from department heads who have the bonuses written into their contracts.
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