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Los Angeles County Population

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1991
About This Section The Times today presents a comprehensive look at the evolving demographies of Los Angeles County, examining the ethnic composition of more than 160 communities and how it has changed during the past 10 years. A computer comparison of new 1990 census data and 1980 figures indicates that the county is less segregated than it was 10 years ago. At the same time, the numbers suggest that new pockets of ethnic imbalance may be in the making.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2012 | By Jack Leonard and Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County jailers are more likely to use force against mentally ill inmates than other prisoners, according to a new Sheriff's Department report that acknowledges the lockups need specially trained staff to reduce the violence. Roughly a third of the 582 deputy use-of-force cases in the jail system last year involved inmates with mental health histories, according to an analysis released Tuesday. About 15% of the jail's 15,000 inmates are classified as mentally ill. The numbers provide a more detailed picture of the confrontations between deputies and inmates, an issue that has sparked intense scrutiny over the last few months and prompted a heated debate Tuesday between Sheriff Lee Baca and some L.A. County supervisors.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1989 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, Times Staff Writer
Five cities in predominantly minority sections of Los Angeles County have been ranked among the poorest communities in the nation by a Chicago-based urbanologist whose survey has come under fire by local demographers and city officials. The 23-page report on the 60 wealthiest and 15 poorest U.S. suburbs, prepared by Roosevelt University professor Pierre deVise, shows per capita yearly income for Cudahy, Bell Gardens, Huntington Park, Compton and South El Monte ranging from $5,170 to $7,100.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2009 | Cara Mia DiMassa
Los Angeles County's homeless population has dropped 38% since 2007, according to a survey conducted earlier this year by the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority. The count, which was conducted over three days in January, pegs the region's homeless population at 42,694 -- down from 68,808 in 2007. "We know that things are changing," said Michael Arnold, executive director of the homeless services authority. "We know, we can sense, we can feel that there's a change out there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1996 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County's population grew last year by a scant 1,419 residents, the smallest expansion in more than 20 years, the Census Bureau reported Thursday. Without an influx of more than 100,000 immigrants last year, the county would have posted a substantial population decline. People moved out of Los Angeles County at a considerably faster rate than they moved in, with 217,000 departing for other destinations in the United States.
MAGAZINE
June 17, 1990 | PATT MORRISON, Patt Morrison is a Times staff writer who has covered Orange and L.A. counties.
WHAT IS IT between Los Angeles and Orange counties? Are we not warmed by the same ultraviolet rays, quenched by the same pirated water, ensnared in the same gill net of freeways? Are our differences really any wider than the line on a gerrymanderer's map? Let us put it to scholars, men of enlightenment and reason. Orange County historian Jim Sleeper (with feeling): "I wouldn't go up to Los Angeles to see Jesus Christ rassle a bear."
NEWS
May 6, 1991 | FRANK CLIFFORD and ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles County documented in the 1990 Census is a metropolis in motion, a place where dramatic population shifts are breaking down old strongholds of racial and ethnic separatism but perhaps laying the foundation for new ones. The traditional boundaries have blurred in a variety of ways. An expanding Latino population has begun to overtake black majorities in Watts and other areas of South-Central Los Angeles, while challenging Anglo dominance of several San Fernando Valley communities.
NEWS
June 29, 1988 | DAVID FERRELL, Times Staff Writer
Led by booming Los Angeles County, the nation's 40 fastest-growing metropolitan areas are expected to add more than 13 million residents by the year 2000, accounting for nearly half of the total population growth in the United States, according to a nationwide study released Tuesday. Los Angeles County, with an estimated 8.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1991
About This Section The Times today presents a comprehensive look at the evolving demographies of Los Angeles County, examining the ethnic composition of more than 160 communities and how it has changed during the past 10 years. A computer comparison of new 1990 census data and 1980 figures indicates that the county is less segregated than it was 10 years ago. At the same time, the numbers suggest that new pockets of ethnic imbalance may be in the making.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1990
Anglo: 41.9 Black: 11.3 Latino: 35.0 Asian and Other: 11.8 The use of the term "minority" to designate people of color has become increasingly erroneous. Anglos are the largest racial group in the county, accounting for 41.9% of the population. But when "minority" figures are combined, these groups account for 58.1% of the overall population. Source: L.A. County Department of Health Services, April, 1988, and the county Commission on Human Relations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2001 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite aggressive outreach by community groups and cities, about 20 neighborhoods in Los Angeles County, from Van Nuys to South-Central to Long Beach, had paltry rates of participation in the 2000 census. While 67% of all Americans returned census forms last year, 46 Los Angeles County tracts had response rates of 50% or less. About half of those tracts also had low response rates in the 1990 census. The city of Los Angeles, which contains 35 of those weak-response tracts, spent $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newly released 2000 census data depict several of California's largest Latino groups as shrinking in the 1990s, an unexpected, improbable result that has community agencies complaining and demographers concerned. Some experts attribute it to a simple change in the census form. Others believe it is a consequence of an evolving pan-Latino consciousness that discourages people from retaining strong national identities.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California's long-predicted new ethnic order became reality in the 1990s, as Latinos ascended to dominance in Los Angeles and nonwhites came to outnumber whites regionwide by more than 3 million, census data released Thursday showed. As the millennium dawned, the combined population of Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Riverside counties hit 16,373,645--surpassing the statewide total in 1960 and topping all other states in 2000 except Texas and New York.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Swelling numbers of Latinos and Asians reshaped Los Angeles County during the past decade into an increasingly diverse place overall but one separated into ethnic and racial enclaves. Despite those growing ethnic communities, the county's overall population did not hit 10 million, as some demographers had expected. In a slight slowing from the previous decade, the number of people living in Los Angeles County edged up 7.4%, bringing the total number of people to about 9.5 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2000 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON and JACQUELINE NEWMYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Census Bureau's Los Angeles region placed second nationally for timeliness and completeness during the 2000 head count, but its performance may have come at the expense of accuracy, according to a growing chorus of area census employees. Census officials vehemently deny any compromise in the integrity of the count nationwide or in the region that includes Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Ventura counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2000 | ANNETTE KONDO and SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
You know who you are. Maybe you are an incurable procrastinator. Or perhaps you relish being a government scofflaw. Whatever your excuse, get ready for a knock at your door as the U.S. Census Bureau kicks off the second wave of its national head count Thursday by tracking down the thousands of residents who did not mail in their forms. The phase is officially known as the "non-response follow-up," which means workers will launch a massive, block-by-block campaign lasting as long as six weeks.
NEWS
March 18, 1998 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fueled by a continued increase in births, a steady march of new immigrants and a robust economy, four Southern California counties were among the 10 nationwide that gained the most residents last year, according to U.S. census figures released Tuesday. Population growth in Los Angeles, Orange, San Diego and Riverside counties exceeded growth in virtually all of the nation's 3,142 counties between the summers of 1996 and 1997, the new estimates showed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1990 | IRENE CHANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Census officials, reacting to criticism from Asian community leaders, said Monday that they will consider modifying a post-census survey in hopes of more accurately tabulating the nation's Asian population. Asian leaders from the San Francisco Bay Area to Los Angeles have decried the so-called "post-enumeration survey," saying it will ignore their community at a time when Asians are the fastest-growing ethnic group in the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2000 | SYLVIA PAGAN WESTPHAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With census questionnaires arriving in homes already, the U.S. Census Bureau kicked off a nationwide effort this week targeting schoolchildren as crucial messengers in their households, hoping they might further stress to their parents the importance of filling out the census form. As part of the awareness effort, called "Teach Census Week," Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante paid a visit Tuesday to an eighth-grade history class at Washington Irving Middle School in northeast Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The demands of providing health care to the growing number of uninsured, plus limited tax revenues, may drive Los Angeles County into bankruptcy in the event of another recession, an expert on local government predicts in a new study.
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