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Los Angeles County Psychiatric Emergency Team

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1990 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mental patient had been terrorizing his Carson neighborhood with a lead pipe--smashing cars, banging on the sidewalk. A call went out to Richard Russell, a member of the Los Angeles County Psychiatric Emergency Team. By the time Russell arrived, the troubled man had retreated indoors. Russell stepped into the house along with a sheriff's deputy and the patient's worried mother. The man saw them, raised an ax and charged. "Insane anger," the veteran psychiatric worker recalled.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1991 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Board of Supervisors moved Tuesday to create a joint panel of mental health and sheriff's officials to investigate why the Los Angeles County Jail has become a hospital of last resort for thousands of mentally ill people. Supervisor Ed Edelman also ordered acting mental health Director Francis Dowling to review the performance of his department's Psychiatric Emergency Teams (PET), which are summoned by police when they are confronted with psychotic and disturbed suspects.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1991 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Board of Supervisors moved Tuesday to create a joint panel of mental health and sheriff's officials to investigate why the Los Angeles County Jail has become a hospital of last resort for thousands of mentally ill people. Supervisor Ed Edelman also ordered acting mental health Director Francis Dowling to review the performance of his department's Psychiatric Emergency Teams (PET), which are summoned by police when they are confronted with psychotic and disturbed suspects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1990 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mental patient had been terrorizing his Carson neighborhood with a lead pipe--smashing cars, banging on the sidewalk. A call went out to Richard Russell, a member of the Los Angeles County Psychiatric Emergency Team. By the time Russell arrived, the troubled man had retreated indoors. Russell stepped into the house along with a sheriff's deputy and the patient's worried mother. The man saw them, raised an ax and charged. "Insane anger," the veteran psychiatric worker recalled.
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