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Los Angeles County Regional Park And Open Space District

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1992 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Any street-savvy city dweller knows that there are certain parks in Los Angeles County where muggings are waiting to happen. Their overgrown lawns are populated by the skeletons of picnic benches, graffiti-covered trees and bathrooms that smell like open sewers. Every year, more parks across the county fall into this state of disrepair, thanks partly to an ever-worsening fiscal crisis in local government. Hoping to remedy the situation, the Board of Supervisors placed Proposition A on the Nov.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1992 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Any street-savvy city dweller knows that there are certain parks in Los Angeles County where muggings are waiting to happen. Their overgrown lawns are populated by the skeletons of picnic benches, graffiti-covered trees and bathrooms that smell like open sewers. Every year, more parks across the county fall into this state of disrepair, thanks partly to an ever-worsening fiscal crisis in local government. Hoping to remedy the situation, the Board of Supervisors placed Proposition A on the Nov.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1997
South Gate has been awarded $400,000 by the Los Angeles County Regional Park and Open Space District to develop a rest area for bicyclists and others using the Los Angeles River trail system. The grant will allow the transformation of a city-owned parcel at Southern and Atlantic avenues into a green space with benches, landscaping, trees and access signs to the trail system, said city spokeswoman Nancy Blaine. "The city is very pleased to have received this grant," said Mayor Bill Martinez.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1998 | SUE FOX
More than $16 million in county grants are available for public and nonprofit agencies to build recreation centers for at-risk youth or senior citizens, prevent graffiti, plant trees, and buy or restore natural lands, rivers and trails. The competitive grants are funded by two Proposition A bond measures, approved by voters in 1992 and 1996, to improve parks and recreational facilities and buy open space. The county will sponsor a workshop Oct. 8 and 9 to teach people how to apply.
NEWS
October 7, 1993 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving to protect one of the few remaining parklands in the city's urban core, the Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday approved the sale of Elyria Canyon in Mt. Washington to the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy. The action, approved unanimously and without discussion, paves the way for the 34-acre park to be acquired with funds from a county bond measure approved by voters last November.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1997 | ROBERTO MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nonresidents are being charged more than residents to use Burbank's new $1.1-million, state-of-the-art tennis facility at McCambridge Park, complete with clay courts, championship seating for 300, and cafe. The same is true for swimming, picnicking and team sports programs at the park. At least, they are now. Some have complained that Burbank shouldn't charge nonresidents more, citing the county's future contribution of $921,000 toward construction of the facility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1999 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A younger Richard Alatorre would not have liked the idea of naming a park after him. Especially since the park in question is a plain one-acre plot of brush and trees buffeted by freeway noise and guarded by a dilapidated chain-link fence and overhead power lines. But at a groundbreaking ceremony Saturday, an older Alatorre, who is retiring after 14 years on the Los Angeles City Council, wholeheartedly embraced the naming of Alatorre-Eagle Rock View Park because the 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1994 | JEFF SCHNAUFER
It sounds like the plot of a rejected film script: a 20-foot-tall killer invading a park and choking every living thing in its path. But the environmental threat of the Arundo donax reed in the Sepulveda Basin is real, and conservation groups have asked Los Angeles County for $200,000 to literally weed out the problem with help from the Los Angeles Conservation Corps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2001 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Supervisor Gloria Molina announced $1.7 million in grants Wednesday for seven open-space improvement projects along the Los Angeles and San Gabriel rivers in eastern Los Angeles County. In addition, the supervisor said $4.5 million more will be awarded in the near future to preservation agencies, cities and nonprofit organizations that propose other projects in her district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1993
Over the years, many developers drooled over the pristine canyon between Longridge Terrace and Dixie Canyon Avenue in Sherman Oaks. They looked at its stands of oak and walnut trees, its streams and abundant wildlife, and came up with variations on the same lousy theme. They would have cut one ridge, or both, filled the canyon and built as many as 60 homes on it. Until last year, it looked as though the least intrusive of these sledgehammer ideas might have gone forward.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
A small city that used Los Angeles County tax dollars to buy a verdant stretch of the Whittier Hills to keep it out of the hands of oil companies now wants to profit from a plan to pump at least 1,000 barrels of crude a day on the same property. And it has a formidable competitor eyeing a share of the royalties, which could range from $7 million to nearly $70 million a year. The dispute between Whittier and Los Angeles County hinges on whether the city has a right to allow development on the 1,280 acres of hill country it purchased in 1994 with $17 million of Proposition A funds, which were intended for conservation purposes.
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