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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1997
The City Council supports selling the city's 132-acre Savage Canyon Landfill to the Los Angeles County Sanitation District in a deal that could generate $9.9 million for the city. The city will now ask a 15-member community advisory panel to review the proposed deal before deciding whether to accept the offer, Councilman Bob Henderson said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1997
The City Council supports selling the city's 132-acre Savage Canyon Landfill to the Los Angeles County Sanitation District in a deal that could generate $9.9 million for the city. The city will now ask a 15-member community advisory panel to review the proposed deal before deciding whether to accept the offer, Councilman Bob Henderson said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1991 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of delay, the Los Angeles County supervisors on Tuesday voted to nearly double the size of the Sunshine Canyon Landfill onto more than 200 acres of hilly land near Granada Hills, extending the dump's life by up to 10 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1991 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of delay, the Los Angeles County supervisors on Tuesday voted to nearly double the size of the Sunshine Canyon Landfill onto more than 200 acres of hilly land near Granada Hills, extending the dump's life by up to 10 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1990 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To some people, deep canyons are refuges for wildlife, buffers against sprawl, places to take a hike. To others, they are ideally suited to provide a basic service as receptacles for trash. This conflict of needs and values has spurred a land rush between two aggressive public agencies with vastly different goals.
NEWS
April 26, 1990
San Gabriel Valley residents who want to safely dispose of household hazardous wastes will have three opportunities in the coming months. The Los Angeles County Sanitation District will collect materials such as paints, used motor oil, pesticides, solvents, automobile batteries and garden products. There is no charge for the 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. collections: * Saturday at the parking lot southwest of the Rose Bowl in Pasadena.
NEWS
April 2, 1987
Vice Mayor Jozelle Smith has been elected chairwoman of the board of directors of the Los Angeles County Sanitation District 11. The district is one of 27 special districts that oversee waste water and solid waste policy in the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1988
Construction has begun in Rolling Hills Estates on a new main-line sewer on Palos Verdes Drive North from Crenshaw Boulevard to a point 600 feet west of Hawthorne Boulevard. The $790,000 Los Angeles County Sanitation District project is expected to take two months to complete. Palos Verdes Drive will carry two-way traffic during construction, and access to side streets will not be restricted, according to the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1991
Prospects that 453 acres of Towsley Canyon in the western Santa Clarita Valley will become a park rather than a dump have been boosted by acquisition of the land by the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, a county official said Thursday. Don Nellor, head of the solid waste planning division of the Los Angeles County Sanitation District, said it would be "very difficult" to get approval for a landfill in Towsley Canyon if there is a state park next door.
NEWS
August 10, 1989
Trash-collection fees for residents will go up 8.6% following the City Council's decision to approve a rate increase requested by Covina Disposal Co. The company said an increase was necessary because of higher fees it must pay the Los Angeles County Sanitation District Landfill and the BKK Landfill. In its request to the city, the company said it needed an increase to cover $4,800 in additional costs, including landfill fees and a 6% franchise fee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1990 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To some people, deep canyons are refuges for wildlife, buffers against sprawl, places to take a hike. To others, they are ideally suited to provide a basic service as receptacles for trash. This conflict of needs and values has spurred a land rush between two aggressive public agencies with vastly different goals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1990
The Los Angeles County Sanitation District will hold the first of four Household Hazardous Waste Roundups today in Pasadena, allowing residents to dispose of up to five gallons of potentially hazardous materials. Sanitation District spokesman Kieran Bergin said each roundup of paints, solvents, pesticides, motor oil and other household products is expected to cost the county $250,000 and attract about 2,000 residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1997
City officials are considering selling the Savage Canyon Landfill because its small size makes it expensive to operate. While Savage Canyon can accept up to 350 tons of trash a day, the nearby regional Puente Hills Landfill averages 12,000 tons per day. Confidential negotiations between Whittier and the Los Angeles County Sanitation District have upset some residents, but city officials say public hearings will be held before any sale.
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