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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1993
Nearly a year after Woodland Hills teen-ager Adam Bischoff drowned in the storm-swollen Los Angeles River, city and county officials have unveiled a program for Los Angeles County schools aimed at preventing children from getting caught in flood control channels. The program includes a videotape that warns of the dangers of flood control channels, which have steep, smooth, concrete walls that make escape almost impossible when they fill with rushing rainwater.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Scott Hamilton Kennedy's excellent scrapbook documentary "Fame High," which premieres Thursday on Showtime (after a brief theatrical release), spends a year at LACHSA, the Los Angeles County High School for the Arts, a by-audition public institution located on the grounds of Cal State L.A. Quite possibly you were unaware of its existence until just a moment ago. The title, of course, recalls the movie "Fame" and the TV show fashioned from it...
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NEWS
August 20, 1985
American Lung Assn. officials gave skin tests to about 40 nursery school children to remind parents of a mandatory tuberculosis testing program that will go into effect at all Los Angeles County schools this fall. The idea for the mandatory program stems from statistics that show that the tuberculosis rate in the county is about twice the national rate. All incoming kindergartners and transfer students from other counties must take the test, American Lung Assn. spokesman Ron Arias said.
OPINION
March 2, 2013
Re “ Report: Gaps in learning start early ,” Feb. 26 What prevents children from becoming “throwaway kids”? Wait for it: “Responsible parents” from conception. Period. End of story. No studies necessary. Joel Anderson Studio City Isn't it possible that a large part of this burden belongs to the parents of these lagging children? Is calling for strong intervention from Los Angeles County schools the answer? It has been shown that the single most important element in children's educational success is the amount of time and effort their parents are willing to put in. Parents who believe the entire responsibility for their children's education belongs in the hands of the schools are parents whose children, no matter which school they attend, will not do as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1996
In a move to bring the technologically laggard Los Angeles County schools up to speed, software developer Davidson & Associates announced Wednesday that it was donating $1 million worth of educational software to the Los Angeles County Office of Education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1988
Four Los Angeles County elementary schools were among 287 winners named in the U.S. Department of Education School Recognition Program. They are John Marshall in the Glendale Unified School District, Silver Spur in the Palos Verdes Peninsula Unified School District, and Balboa Gifted/High Ability Magnet and Taper Avenue in the Los Angeles Unified School District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY
The Los Angeles City Council approved an agreement Tuesday that allows Los Angeles County schools to open a new campus in Canoga Park for juvenile offenders on probation. The agreement with the county Office of Education sets conditions for operating a 51-student Community Education Center in a commercial section of Sherman Way.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1994 | SUSAN BYRNES
Students from three San Fernando Valley high schools will join representatives from 23 other Los Angeles County schools at a two-day summit next week to identify ways to reduce teen-age violence on and off campus. Sponsored by the Los Angeles County Office of Education and the alcohol prevention program Friday Night Live, the "Harmony Summit" will be held Tuesday and Wednesday in Malibu.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The county superintendent of schools on Monday urged elementary school officials from Acton and Agua Dulce to cancel plans to begin a local high school program this fall, an indication that the county may block local parents' desires to keep children near home. Los Angeles County Schools Supt. Stuart Gothold made the request in a four-page letter to the Soledad-Agua Dulce Union School District, warning that the expense of ninth-grade classes would bankrupt the small, rural district.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Fame may be fleeing, but the kids in "Fame High" will stay with you. Directed, photographed and co-edited by Scott Hamilton Kennedy, "Fame High" covers a year and change in the life of the Los Angeles County High School for the Arts, familiarly known as LACHSA, one of the top performing arts schools in the country. Though this scenario may sound familiar, courtesy of the 1980 and 2009 versions of "Fame" and TV shows such as "Glee," the film itself is not. Try as they might, fictional kids can't compete with the real thing, don't compel us like these earnest, hopeful and winning young people, bound and determined to devote themselves to their art. PHOTOS: Hollywood backlot moments It's not only this idealism that makes the subjects of "Fame High" so compelling, it's also their honesty, their willingness to open a window into their lives at that pivotal moment when they're taking their first tentative steps toward becoming their own person personally and professionally.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2011 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
Three decades after leaving her native Panama, Vielka McFarlane hasn't forgotten how a first-class education can transform a poor kid with a hard-knocks life. The Los Angeles charter school operator remembers leaner days and long hours helping her struggling family sell empanadas from a street cart. Her eyes mist when she speaks of her hardworking parents, who sacrificed to send her to the best schools in Panama, despite discrimination from that society's upper-class, and then to Los Angeles in 1982.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2001 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many more government and private resources should be focused on preschool-age children in Los Angeles County if they are to grow up and escape the poverty that many now endure, according to a report to be released today by the United Way of Greater Los Angeles. The study, "From Cradle to K: Ensuring Success by Six for All L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2001
What Is the API? California's Academic Performance Index is the cornerstone of Gov. Gray Davis' push to hold schools accountable for student performance. This release is the second to indicate whether schools are meeting improvement targets for the Stanford 9 set by the state. Schools must meet those targets--for the school overall and for sizable subgroups within each school--to qualify for cash awards that the state has set aside to encourage academic improvement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2001 | JESSICA GARRISON and ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Cracking down on bullying will be a major campus objective this year, according to many school officials who spent the summer studying school shootings and character education. In southern Orange County's Capistrano Unified School District, Supt. James A. Fleming says campus officials will mete out harsher punishments to bullies and deliver more lessons on citizenship.
NEWS
August 16, 2001
* UNDERSTANDING THE NUMBERS / READING THE TABLES In California, nearly 4.5 million public school students in grades 2 through 11 took the Stanford 9 standardized tests in the spring, for the fourth year in a row. All of them were tested in reading, math and language skills such as grammar and punctuation. Students through eighth grade also took a spelling test, and students in higher grades took exams in science and history/social science.
NEWS
June 4, 1988 | Compiled by Jerry Gillam, Times staff writer
Floor Action: Gangs: Passed and sent to the Senate on a 49-20 vote a bill (AB 3723) by Assemblyman Richard Katz (D-Sepulveda) to require the development of community-based gang violence intervention programs for grades K-12 in Los Angeles County schools. Automobile Insurance: Passed and sent to the Senate on a 44-26 vote a bill (AB 4325) by Assemblyman Tom Bane (D-Tarzana) to limit automobile insurance underwriting profits to 5%. Any excess profits would have to be refunded to policyholders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1999 | KATE FOLMAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seventy-two Los Angeles County schools will be among 430 California campuses taking their first brave steps toward accountability this year. The campuses were notified Wednesday that their applications had been accepted to become the first bellwether group in the state's new $96-million school intervention program. Aimed at campuses where standardized test scores have languished in the bottom half of the state standings for two years running, the program is a crucial part of Gov.
NEWS
August 16, 2001 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The 81 public school districts in Los Angeles County serve some of the nation's most deprived children as well as some of the most privileged. Yet despite the diversity of circumstances, surprisingly uniform patterns emerge after four years of results from the state's Stanford 9 testing program. In reading, the youngest students are making the greatest gains. In math, progress is dramatic and virtually across the board. A few districts have sorted out middle school reading.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2001 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tall candy-cane hats waggled around school campuses across Southern California on Friday, a day set aside to remember Dr. Seuss and to celebrate reading. Cat in the Hat costumes, eggs dyed bright green and other Seussian paraphernalia accompanied readings by celebrities, officials and other volunteers to mark the fourth annual Read Across America, a national event that organizers estimated would involve 30 million children and adults. Started in 1998 by the National Education Assn.
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