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Los Angeles County Schools Security

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1994
A Los Angeles County program has been cited as a national model for decreasing violence in schools. The county Office of Education's Teacher Expectation and Student Achievement program, begun in 1971, was recently recommended by the New York State Board of Regents as a model training program to help teachers promote school safety. The program concentrates on helping teachers become more aware of the needs of their students, addressing such issues as teacher bias and ethnic diversity.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1995 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The story of two Palos Verdes Peninsula High School students and a bag of marijuana shows how a quiet school in a district known for safety and scholarship has had to cope with increasing violence this year. The two friends hatch a plan to sell the pot and split the profits, recalls Bill Howard, a school district administrator who oversees expulsions. But one boy swaps the marijuana for oregano and leaves his would-be business partner with nothing but a bag of cheap spice.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1993 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Los Angeles school board member Victoria Castro convened a new board committee on school safety issues for the first time Thursday, moving to find better ways to help troubled elementary schoolchildren and coordinate the district's disjointed anti-violence programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1994
A Los Angeles County program has been cited as a national model for decreasing violence in schools. The county Office of Education's Teacher Expectation and Student Achievement program, begun in 1971, was recently recommended by the New York State Board of Regents as a model training program to help teachers promote school safety. The program concentrates on helping teachers become more aware of the needs of their students, addressing such issues as teacher bias and ethnic diversity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1994 | SANDRA HERNANDEZ and JEAN MERL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES, Hernandez is a special correspondent; Merl is a Times education writer
A week of mounting racial tensions between blacks and Latinos at Paramount High School erupted into a lunch-period melee involving hundreds of students Friday, sheriff's deputies and school officials said. Only a few minor injuries were reported, and there were no immediate arrests. Dozens of sheriff's deputies helped school staff get students back into their classrooms, where they were held until they could be escorted off campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1995 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The story of two Palos Verdes Peninsula High School students and a bag of marijuana shows how a quiet school in a district known for safety and scholarship has had to cope with increasing violence this year. The two friends hatch a plan to sell the pot and split the profits, recalls Bill Howard, a school district administrator who oversees expulsions. But one boy swaps the marijuana for oregano and leaves his would-be business partner with nothing but a bag of cheap spice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1994 | SANDRA HERNANDEZ and JEAN MERL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES, Hernandez is a special correspondent; Merl is a Times education writer
A week of mounting racial tensions between blacks and Latinos at Paramount High School erupted into a lunch-period melee involving hundreds of students Friday, sheriff's deputies and school officials said. Only a few minor injuries were reported, and there were no immediate arrests. Dozens of sheriff's deputies helped school staff get students back into their classrooms, where they were held until they could be escorted off campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1993 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Los Angeles school board member Victoria Castro convened a new board committee on school safety issues for the first time Thursday, moving to find better ways to help troubled elementary schoolchildren and coordinate the district's disjointed anti-violence programs.
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