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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1987 | BILL BOYARSKY, Times City-County Bureau Chief
The legislative struggle over the future of public transportation in Los Angeles County has started, and local politicians and rival transit agencies are already fighting for control. "Everyone is defending their turf and nobody trusts anyone else," said Chairman Richard Katz (D-Sepulveda), whose Assembly Transportation Committee will hold a hearing Wednesday in Los Angeles on several competing plans to reorganize a troubled system.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2001 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite parking problems and a monthlong strike that halted mass transit, ridership on Los Angeles' now-completed Red Line subway has approached estimates made two years before stations opened in North Hollywood and Universal City. But there's still a 20% shortfall in boardings at two of the final three stops, and the MTA is launching a $68,000 advertising campaign to boost overall ridership. From July to November, the North Hollywood station had a weekday average of 6,215 boardings.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2001 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite parking problems and a monthlong strike that halted mass transit, ridership on Los Angeles' now-completed Red Line subway has approached estimates made two years before stations opened in North Hollywood and Universal City. But there's still a 20% shortfall in boardings at two of the final three stops, and the MTA is launching a $68,000 advertising campaign to boost overall ridership. From July to November, the North Hollywood station had a weekday average of 6,215 boardings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1998 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Siding with bus rider advocates, a special judge has ruled against the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and imposed a strict standard for determining if the transit agency has complied with a federal court order to reduce overcrowding on its buses. After considering arguments filed by both sides, Special Master Donald T.
NEWS
July 12, 1996 | RICHARD SIMON and JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles subway, panned by some as a 3.2-mile pastrami express because it ends at a deli, becomes more like a real urban transit system with the opening Saturday of a 2.1-mile extension from downtown to the Wilshire corridor. After spending $578 million over five years, transit officials are cheering an important milestone in the West's largest public works project. MTA officials will dedicate the extension today and open it to the public Saturday for a weekend of free rides.
NEWS
October 22, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON and JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hundreds of feet beneath the Santa Monica Mountains, far below a residential driveway, Los Angeles will mark a milestone today, when a massive tunneling machine punches through a wall of rock and soil and opens a path for the subway between the San Fernando Valley and Hollywood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1998 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County public works officials have asked the MTA to explain why a section of the Los Angeles River has sunk more than 2 inches since subway work crews began tunneling under it in 1996. "We want to know what's going on," said Lance Grindle, the supervising engineer who oversees permits for the flood-control channel. "I think there's been a gradual settlement. It has exceeded the initial settlement we thought we'd get."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1998 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Siding with bus rider advocates, a special judge has ruled against the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and imposed a strict standard for determining if the transit agency has complied with a federal court order to reduce overcrowding on its buses. After considering arguments filed by both sides, Special Master Donald T.
NEWS
July 8, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Labor negotiations between the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and union leaders representing bus drivers and train operators continued into the early hours today in hopes of averting a strike that could strand tens of thousands of riders who depend on public transit and create a traffic mess for those who don't. Just minutes before a 12:01 a.m.
NEWS
July 8, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As labor negotiations went down to the wire, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority braced for a bus and rail strike today that could strand tens of thousands of Los Angeles County residents who depend on public transit while it creates a traffic mess for those who don't. Union leaders representing 4,200 bus and train drivers set 12:01 a.m. today for a walkout if no agreement was reached on a new contract. Union mechanics and clerks were expected to honor the picket line.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1998 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County public works officials have asked the MTA to explain why a section of the Los Angeles River has sunk more than 2 inches since subway work crews began tunneling under it in 1996. "We want to know what's going on," said Lance Grindle, the supervising engineer who oversees permits for the flood-control channel. "I think there's been a gradual settlement. It has exceeded the initial settlement we thought we'd get."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1998 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority has agreed to pay $200,000 to the family of a bus rider who was beaten to death after complaining when the driver stopped at a hamburger stand to allow a friend to buy a meal. The MTA was sued because the bus driver neither interceded in the incident nor summoned paramedics or the police. She kept driving, according to a report to the transit agency's board, which settled the family's lawsuit last week.
NEWS
October 22, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON and JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hundreds of feet beneath the Santa Monica Mountains, far below a residential driveway, Los Angeles will mark a milestone today, when a massive tunneling machine punches through a wall of rock and soil and opens a path for the subway between the San Fernando Valley and Hollywood.
NEWS
July 8, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Labor negotiations between the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and union leaders representing bus drivers and train operators continued into the early hours today in hopes of averting a strike that could strand tens of thousands of riders who depend on public transit and create a traffic mess for those who don't. Just minutes before a 12:01 a.m.
NEWS
July 8, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As labor negotiations went down to the wire, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority braced for a bus and rail strike today that could strand tens of thousands of Los Angeles County residents who depend on public transit while it creates a traffic mess for those who don't. Union leaders representing 4,200 bus and train drivers set 12:01 a.m. today for a walkout if no agreement was reached on a new contract. Union mechanics and clerks were expected to honor the picket line.
NEWS
July 12, 1996 | RICHARD SIMON and JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles subway, panned by some as a 3.2-mile pastrami express because it ends at a deli, becomes more like a real urban transit system with the opening Saturday of a 2.1-mile extension from downtown to the Wilshire corridor. After spending $578 million over five years, transit officials are cheering an important milestone in the West's largest public works project. MTA officials will dedicate the extension today and open it to the public Saturday for a weekend of free rides.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1998 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority has agreed to pay $200,000 to the family of a bus rider who was beaten to death after complaining when the driver stopped at a hamburger stand to allow a friend to buy a meal. The MTA was sued because the bus driver neither interceded in the incident nor summoned paramedics or the police. She kept driving, according to a report to the transit agency's board, which settled the family's lawsuit last week.
NATIONAL
June 27, 2008 | Richard Simon, Times Staff Writer
As commuters increasingly turn to bus and rail lines because of soaring gasoline prices, public transit, long the poor relation of American travel, is finally getting respect -- and money. In an effort to make riding bus and rail lines even more appealing, the House on Thursday moved to provide $1.7 billion to help transit agencies pay higher fuel costs, limit fare hikes and expand service. California would receive about $266 million. That's on top of a record $10 billion -- a $1-billion increase -- a congressional committee recently recommended for expanding transit nationwide in the next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1987 | BILL BOYARSKY, Times City-County Bureau Chief
The legislative struggle over the future of public transportation in Los Angeles County has started, and local politicians and rival transit agencies are already fighting for control. "Everyone is defending their turf and nobody trusts anyone else," said Chairman Richard Katz (D-Sepulveda), whose Assembly Transportation Committee will hold a hearing Wednesday in Los Angeles on several competing plans to reorganize a troubled system.
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