Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLos Angeles County Transportation Finances
IN THE NEWS

Los Angeles County Transportation Finances

NEWS
June 21, 1998 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority has built much more than a troubled subway. It has dug a $7-billion financial hole that has crippled the nation's second-largest bus system and left Los Angeles County taxpayers to foot the bill for the next 30 years. The MTA and the agencies that preceded it have financed construction of a rail system, including the shortest and most expensive subway in American history, by engaging in a nearly nonstop frenzy of borrowing that began in the mid-1980s.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1998 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Metropolitan Transportation Authority directors finally approved their long-debated "recovery plan" Wednesday, but the document faces almost as bumpy a journey to Sacramento and Washington as riders on the MTA's old buses endure every day. Although the plan is intended to reassure federal officials that America's best-known--and perhaps most troubled--transit agency is getting control of its finances, serious financial and political troubles lie ahead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1998 | JIM NEWTON and RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The fate of Los Angeles' epic struggle to re-create a workable mass transit system hung Thursday on the decision of one auto worker-turned-lawmaker, as Rep. Esteban E. Torres weighed the merits of a proposed compromise on federal funding for the perpetually troubled Metropolitan Transportation Authority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1997 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City Councilwoman Laura Chick and former Assemblyman Richard Katz called Thursday for an audit of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to determine if the agency has given the San Fernando Valley its share of rail funding. In particular, the two Valley lawmakers want to make sure that the MTA has complied with a 1984 law written by former state Sen. Alan Robbins that requires the MTA to spend 15% of all local rail money in the Valley or set it aside in a trust fund.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1997 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Assemblyman Richard Katz and City Councilwoman Laura Chick called Thursday for an audit of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to determine if the agency has given the San Fernando Valley its share of rail funding. In particular, the two Valley lawmakers want to make sure that the MTA has complied with a 1984 law that requires spending 15% of all local rail money in the Valley or setting it aside in a trust fund.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority may have trouble with its tunnels, but there's now no doubt about the holes in its finances. An independent analysis of the MTA's $2.8-billion budget by Mayor Richard Riordan's staff has found "unrealistic financial assumptions and flawed funding plans," including a bigger deficit in this year's budget than the agency thought existed--one that could grow to nearly $60 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority may have trouble with its tunnels, but there's now no doubt about the holes in its finances. An independent analysis of the MTA's $2.8-billion budget by Mayor Richard Riordan's staff has found "unrealistic financial assumptions and flawed funding plans," including a bigger deficit in this year's budget than the agency thought existed--one that could grow to nearly $60 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1997 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The top manager of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's Pasadena Blue Line project was replaced and his deputy was fired Friday in the wake of a scathing audit that found skyrocketing design and engineering costs. Project manager David Sievers was reassigned to another job, deputy project manager Lynn Struthers was terminated and a new interim project manager was appointed in a major shake-up of those in charge of running the $800-million light-rail project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whether you live in Long Beach or Palmdale, you should care about the Los Angeles subway project. You're paying for it. Every time you buy anything taxable in Los Angeles County, one cent of every dollar goes to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1997 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the heels of another blistering audit of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's light rail line to Pasadena, the agency has disciplined the project's top two officials for failing to curb chronic cost overruns that have sent design costs skyrocketing to almost $94 million with construction barely begun.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|