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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2000 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saturday nights were party nights at Maverick's Flat, and when the Ike and Tina Turner Revue got in the groove and Marlon Brando and Steve McQueen kicked back in the shadows, there was no other place to be on a hot Los Angeles night. It was the late 1960s, and the Crenshaw-area club epitomized the hip, sophisticated camaraderie that blossomed during the civil rights era.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This Catholic church in the middle of Watts has stood strong through times of civil revolt and decades of demographic tumult. It survived unscathed when most everything around it burned during the riots of 1965 and then 1992. It has undergone profound demographic shifts: nearly all white through the 1920s, nearly all black in 1950s and '60s. Mostly Latino in 2000. The people of St. Lawrence of Brindisi have long represented the faces, struggles and celebrations of the people of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2000 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The highly regarded Southern California Institute of Architecture will move its campus to downtown Los Angeles in a major boost for civic efforts to revive the central city with new cultural and educational institutions. SCI-Arc, as the school is known, will bring its more than 500 students and staff to a $60-million commercial and residential development planned for the artists' loft district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You might call it a monument to California's spirit of reinvention--a building with nearly as many lives as a cat and more connections to Los Angeles' civic culture than most politicians. In its 75-year history, downtown's Subway Terminal Building has housed the city's first underground transit terminal, doubled as a World War II bomb shelter, provided hospital care to veterans, and acted as the local office of the Department of Social Security.
MAGAZINE
March 19, 2000
I visited Spain with my 94-year-old mother and my sister. We started in Madrid, then went to Frank Gehry's Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, through Galicia and back to Madrid. We went to a couple of flamenco shows, had fabulous food at a Basque restaurant, took a lot of naps and stayed out until 3 or 4 a.m. every day. Spain has shed its backward ways. It's a very modern place. * DISCOVERY: The ancient Spanish city of Burgos, where my grandfather is from, and the beautiful seaport town of La Coruna.
NEWS
March 10, 2000 | MARY McNAMARA and JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
There may be grumbling at the gasoline pumps, but it takes a lot more than $1.60 a gallon to make Angelenos change their ways. Last week's 11.5-cent increase, coupled with alarming predictions of a $2-a-gallon summer, is causing some drivers to shop around for lower-priced stations, but experts don't expect a stampede toward mass transit, a fire sale on SUVs or even an increase in carpool-lane traffic any time soon.
NEWS
January 27, 2000 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the emerging majority in Los Angeles County, Latinos are not only making political and economic strides, but are gaining greater recognition from other ethnic and racial groups, according to a United Way report being released today. A growing interest in Spanish is one bellwether cited in the report, which provides a detailed look at the nation's largest Latino population center.
NEWS
December 31, 1999 | ED LEIBOWITZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A century ago, we hear the same old Horatio Alger story: the humble beginnings, the lightning ascent, the prediction of a future of such breathtaking proportions that any eventuality is bound to pale in comparison. A century ago, Los Angeles is without freeways, diverted Colorado River water or a film industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1999 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some Angelenos celebrated Christmas in true Hollywood style: at the movies. About 75 people huddled in a darkened theater in the Fairfax district Saturday afternoon to watch a matinee screening of "The Bishop's Wife," a 1947 holiday classic starring Cary Grant. "This is really what Christmas is all about: watching old movies," said Sherman Oaks resident Bill Robens, 29, who went to see the film at the Silent Movie Theatre on Fairfax Avenue before heading home for Christmas dinner.
MAGAZINE
December 19, 1999 | SCOTT HARRIS, Scott Harris is a former columnist for The Times. His last article for the magazine was a profile of liver transplant surgeon Ronald W. Busuttil
Funny, but it wasn't too long ago that optimists were heralding a new dawn in Southern California politics, a chance to leave behind the stormy racial and ethnic conflicts of the '90s. The occasion was the election of three members to the Los Angeles Board of Education, a slate backed by Mayor Richard Riordan to reform the district.
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