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NEWS
March 10, 2000 | MARY McNAMARA and JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
There may be grumbling at the gasoline pumps, but it takes a lot more than $1.60 a gallon to make Angelenos change their ways. Last week's 11.5-cent increase, coupled with alarming predictions of a $2-a-gallon summer, is causing some drivers to shop around for lower-priced stations, but experts don't expect a stampede toward mass transit, a fire sale on SUVs or even an increase in carpool-lane traffic any time soon.
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NEWS
December 31, 1999 | ED LEIBOWITZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A century ago, we hear the same old Horatio Alger story: the humble beginnings, the lightning ascent, the prediction of a future of such breathtaking proportions that any eventuality is bound to pale in comparison. A century ago, Los Angeles is without freeways, diverted Colorado River water or a film industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1999 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some Angelenos celebrated Christmas in true Hollywood style: at the movies. About 75 people huddled in a darkened theater in the Fairfax district Saturday afternoon to watch a matinee screening of "The Bishop's Wife," a 1947 holiday classic starring Cary Grant. "This is really what Christmas is all about: watching old movies," said Sherman Oaks resident Bill Robens, 29, who went to see the film at the Silent Movie Theatre on Fairfax Avenue before heading home for Christmas dinner.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1999 | KAMAU DAAOOD
On Tuesday, Rhino Records is releasing "Central Avenue Sounds: Jazz in Los Angeles (1921-1956)," a four-CD boxed set that has been assembled as a companion to the paperback version of the acclaimed book by the same name. Originally published in 1998 by the University of California Press, the oral history of the vital L.A. jazz scene was edited by Steven Isoardi, who was asked to co-produce the recording.
NEWS
July 23, 1999 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The night of his brother's stabbing will forever burn in the mind of artist Willie Herron. He wanted the world to remember too--to have the image of his 15-year-old brother, John, stabbed by gang members, permanently inscribed on the wall of the Eastside alley behind his family's home. So on that night in June 1972, after taking his brother to the hospital and saying a quick prayer, he painted a mural, guided by friends holding flashlights, on a building owned by his uncle.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1999
Want to check out the salsa scene? These clubs offer live salsa orchestras. In many cases, a free dancing lesson is included in the admission price. The Conga Room. 5364 Wilshire Blvd. Thursdays-Saturdays. Cover: $12-$100. Dancing lessons on Thursdays at 8 p.m. (323) 938-1696. El Floridita. 1253 N. Vine St. Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays. Cover: $10. Dancing lessons on Wednesdays at 8 p.m. (323) 871-8612. Sportsmen's Lodge. 4234 Coldwater Canyon Blvd., Studio City. Some Fridays.
SPORTS
June 27, 1999 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sports arenas don't normally have wine cellars. Or private lounges where members keep their cigars in humidors. Or restaurants where the sous-chefs fuss over which hard-crusted breads to serve with hummus. But the Staples Center, under construction downtown, is not shaping up as a normal arena. From its $300,000 luxury boxes to waiters who hustle down aisles with radio-equipped order pads, this will be an unusually extravagant sports venue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1999 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a few hours, Central Avenue's past as the heart of L.A.'s jazz scene came alive Saturday and that gave one-time trumpeter and vocalist Clora Bryant goose bumps. "I live jazz every day and I love this," the 72-year-old Bryant said, rubbing the goose bumps on her arms as she watched some of the nearly 1,000 volunteers who fanned out across Central's old jazz quarter to spruce it up as part of a cultural preservation effort by L.A. Works.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER
"If you don't own a car, you're not living the L.A. lifestyle," intoned a local television news anchor a few days after my car was stolen. Or, as novelist Philip Reed, wrote in his "car noir thriller" last year, telegraphing a plan to pilfer the hero's 1964 Chevy Impala: "That would get him out of the picture. Because, in L.A., stealing a guy's car was like cutting him off at the knees." When the hero discovered the treasured vehicle missing, "his worst nightmare was realized--he was in L.A.
NEWS
June 1, 1999 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
My husband and I, we come from different worlds. His is fraught with peril, the landscape crowded with predators and obstacles strewn before him by the forces of a hostile universe. Mine is a place of order laced with tedium, of occasional backtracking and much waiting. He struggles to discover the elusive One True Way; I believe those also serve who only stand and wait. Thus far, we have been able to live with our differences.
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