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Los Angeles Department Animal Regulation

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1995 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a law enforcement world that deals with murders, arson, kidnapings and robberies, a barking dog would presumably take a low priority. But the problem nonetheless affects the quality of life of thousands of Los Angeles residents whose neighbors' pets destroy their peace of mind.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The good news is that after more than a year with only one veterinarian to care for the 74,000 animals that come through Los Angeles shelters each year, the Animal Regulation Department hired a second vet last week. The bad news is that he quit the next day. "He was really not here long enough for me to get used to," said Dena Mangiamele, the department's lone vet. "What are you going to do?" Mangiamele said that Grover H.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The good news is that after more than a year with only one veterinarian to care for the 74,000 animals that come through Los Angeles shelters each year, the Animal Regulation Department hired a second vet last week. The bad news is that he quit the next day. "He was really not here long enough for me to get used to," said Dena Mangiamele, the department's lone vet. "What are you going to do?" Mangiamele said that Grover H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is good news and bad news for the beleaguered Los Angeles Animal Regulation Department. The good news is that after more than a year with only one veterinarian to care for the 74,000 animals that come through the city shelters each year, the department hired a second vet last week. The bad news is that he quit the next day. "He was really not here long enough for me to get used to," said Dena Mangiamele, the department's lone vet. "What are you going to do?" Mangiamele said that Grover H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is good news and bad news for the beleaguered Los Angeles Animal Regulation Department. The good news is that after more than a year with only one veterinarian to care for the 74,000 animals that come through the city shelters each year, the department hired a second vet last week. The bad news is that he quit the next day. "He was really not here long enough for me to get used to," said Dena Mangiamele, the department's lone vet. "What are you going to do?" Mangiamele said that Grover H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1991
Because of budget cuts, the Los Angeles Department of Animal Regulation will close all six city animal-care and control centers at 5 p.m. instead of 7 p.m. on Wednesdays, beginning May 15. Centers will remain open Monday through Saturday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Emergency and medical staffing will continue on a 24-hour basis, seven days a week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1989
"We've got a lot of questions about what's going on out there and, until we answer them, they can no longer have arena polo at the center." --Michael Burns, district supervisor for the Los Angeles Department of Animal Regulation, which ordered a halt to the glitzy indoor polo games at the Los Angeles Equestrian Center after the death of two horses during a match.
NEWS
June 18, 1987
Shirley Lee Sperl, who did volunteer work for the Los Angeles Department of Animal Regulation, has been honored posthumously with the St. Francis of Assisi Award. The award was presented to Sperl's mother, Timmie Lee Sperl, by Mayor Tom Bradley. Sperl was honored for her years of "personal and organized efforts at reducing the population of unwanted dogs and cats in the city," a department statement said. As a city councilman in 1971, Bradley originated the award.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1997
To help prevent an upsurge in potentially lethal pet diseases, the city is sponsoring vaccinations and licensing this summer for unlicensed pets in a "one-stop shopping" deal, said Peter Persic of the Los Angeles Department of Animal Regulation. "We're running about two clinics per week throughout the city," he said. The next clinic will be 7:00 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday at Mar Vista Recreation Center at 11430 Woodbine St. Vaccinations cost $4 to $11 apiece.
NEWS
October 1, 1987
All six City of Los Angeles Department of Animal Regulation shelters will be closed Columbus Day, Oct. 12. "We urge citizens, especially those who will be going away for a long weekend, to make certain that their pets are taken care of properly," said Robert I. Rush, department general manager. "Make arrangements for food and water for them, and for protection from the weather." Rush said that after extended weekends, local shelters often receive numerous inquiries regarding lost pets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1995 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a law enforcement world that deals with murders, arson, kidnapings and robberies, a barking dog would presumably take a low priority. But the problem nonetheless affects the quality of life of thousands of Los Angeles residents whose neighbors' pets destroy their peace of mind.
NEWS
July 8, 1993
Low cost rabies vaccinations for dogs will be available at the Silver Lake Recreation Center on Saturday from the Southern California Veterinary Medical Assn. in cooperation with the city of Los Angeles Department of Animal Regulation. Rabies vaccinations are required by law. The clinic will also offer an optional six-in-one vaccination against other canine diseases. Rabies shots are $4, and the six-in-one shot is $9. Hours are 3 to 4:30 p.m. at the center, 1850 W. Silver Lake Blvd.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1990
A truck carrying 140 calves collided Tuesday with a truckload of potatoes on the Foothill Freeway, blocking the freeway with animals and vegetables, the California Highway Patrol reported. The trucks were traveling east on the Foothill Freeway when they collided near the Sunland Boulevard exit at 2:25 p.m., CHP Officer Harold Daly said. The number-four lane of the freeway was blocked as workers corralled the calves and loaded them into another trailer and cleaned potatoes from the road.
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