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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1997 | ANGIE CHUANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police, responding to complaints that a woman described by neighbors as a local eccentric had cut their telephone and cable TV lines, discovered 45 cats in her house Tuesday amid piles of excrement and swarms of fleas, authorities said. "This is the worst-smelling place I've ever been in," Los Angeles Police Sgt. Bob Weisz said. Police arrested Fleeta Koranda, 74, on suspicion of making terrorist threats to her neighbors, who said she had harassed and threatened them for years.
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OPINION
December 30, 2012
December may turn out to be the first month that the shelter system run by the Los Angeles Department of Animal Services did not euthanize any treatable or healthy animals in its care. That is an extraordinary landmark in the world of animal welfare. Achieving "no-kill" status is the moral ambition of any animal shelter obligated to accept whatever is surrendered at its door or picked up off the streets. Although no-kill almost never means every animal taken in gets out alive - the hopelessly ill and dangerously aggressive are put down - it demonstrates genuine commitment in a nation where 3 million to 4 million dogs and cats are euthanized in shelters each year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1999 | CAITLIN LIU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Putting the ghost of Pal the Pug to rest, at least for now, a judge threw out the remainder of a lawsuit Thursday filed by a veterinarian against Los Angeles Department of Animal Services officers. The dog, who belonged to an Encino resident, was found, barely alive, in April 1997, his skin torn off. Dr. Melvyn Richkind said the dog had been skinned alive by someone with a knife, but animal services officers said he had been attacked by a coyote. Pal's death caused an uproar across Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2012 | By Ari Bloomekatz, Los Angeles Times
The Department of Animal Services has become an unruly place where equipment is unaccounted for, at least $125,000 is missing and up to $1.3 million in potential revenue was overlooked over the last two fiscal years, a new report has found. The audit, conducted over two years and released Tuesday, describes policy and possible ethics breakdowns across the agency, with particular focus on poor supervision and management. In one example, department officials could not show investigators whether donations were spent legitimately.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1997 | ANGIE CHUANG and JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles Department of Animal Services declared Thursday that a mutilated dog discovered in an Encino yard earlier this week was attacked by a coyote. But a Los Angeles city councilman, backed up a veterinarian who examined the animal, insisted it had been skinned by a human being. The pug, named Pal, was the companion of an 84-year-old Encino woman who is deaf and nearly blind. She found it injured beneath a bush in her yard in the 16600 block of Morrison Street on Tuesday morning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1997 | JAMES RICCI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The controversy over the death of Pal, the pug apparently skinned alive, escalated this weekend as a city animal-regulation agency unsuccessfully searched a Northridge veterinary clinic for the dog's post-injury treatment records. The clinic is owned by veterinarian Melvyn Richkind, who has vigorously disputed a necropsy finding by the Los Angeles Department of Animal Services that the dog was killed by coyotes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1997 | ANGIE CHUANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police investigating complaints that a woman described by neighbors as a local eccentric had cut their telephone and cable TV lines discovered 45 cats in her house Tuesday amid piles of excrement and swarms of fleas, authorities said. "This is the worst-smelling place I've ever been in," said LAPD Sgt. Bob Weisz. Police arrested Fleeta Koranda, 74, on suspicion of making terrorist threats to her neighbors, who allege that she had harassed and threatened them for years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1997 | CLAIRE VITUCCI
Pet owners can have their dogs and cats vaccinated against rabies and other diseases at a series of clinics offered over the next few months. The city Department of Animal Services will sponsor seven rabies vaccination clinics starting today and continuing through September. Clinics also will offer the DHLPP or six-in-one vaccination, which inoculates dogs against six diseases, including hepatitis, parainfluenza and parvo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2000 | By MARTHA L. WILLMAN,
Two years after authorizing a plan to implant identity microchips in pets, Los Angeles city officials have yet to implement the program--even though it could potentially save thousands of animals from being euthanized. The program, mandated by the City Council in January 1998, calls for electronically tagging all dogs and cats adopted out of the city's six shelters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2000 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than two hours of testimony from animal activists and pleas by a group of fifth-graders, a Los Angeles City Council committee Monday pushed ahead controversial proposals aimed at reducing the number of unaltered and stray dogs and cats. If adopted by the full City Council, the new rules and higher fees would give Los Angeles what is believed to be the toughest ordinance on spaying and neutering of any major city in America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2000 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than two hours of testimony from animal activists and pleas by a group of fifth-graders, a Los Angeles City Council committee Monday pushed ahead controversial proposals aimed at reducing the number of unaltered and stray dogs and cats. If adopted by the full City Council, the new rules and higher fees would give Los Angeles what is believed to be the toughest ordinance on spaying and neutering of any major city in America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2000 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than two hours of testimony from animal activists and pleas by a group of fifth-graders, a Los Angeles City Council committee on Monday pushed ahead a controversial proposal to hike fees aimed at reducing the number of unaltered and stray dogs and cats. If adopted by the full City Council, the rules could give Los Angeles what is believed to be the toughest spay/neuter ordinance of any major city in America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2000 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A small but passionate band of animal welfare advocates is transforming the way Los Angeles City Hall deals with unwanted pets--and may soon be forcing pet owners to change their ways as well. Appalled that more than 50,000 animals are put to death each year in city shelters, activists have forced both the state and city to ease rules for pet adoption.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2000 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A small but passionate band of animal welfare advocates is transforming the way Los Angeles City Hall deals with unwanted pets--and may soon be forcing pet owners to change their ways as well. Appalled that more than 50,000 animals are put to death each year in city shelters, activists have already forced both the state and city to ease rules for pet adoptions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2000 | By MARTHA L. WILLMAN,
Two years after authorizing a plan to implant identity microchips in pets, Los Angeles city officials have yet to implement the program--even though it could potentially save thousands of animals from being euthanized. The program, mandated by the City Council in January 1998, calls for electronically tagging all dogs and cats adopted out of the city's six shelters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1999 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of animal activists are expected to turn out Tuesday for a hearing on one of the most contentious issues before Los Angeles officials: pet overpopulation. The hearing before the Animal Regulation Commission, to be held in the large Community Center at Los Angeles Mission College in Sylmar, will be the first since a rowdy, overflow crowd forced abrupt cancellation of a similar meeting in August.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2000 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A small but passionate band of animal welfare advocates is transforming the way Los Angeles City Hall deals with unwanted pets--and may soon be forcing pet owners to change their ways as well. Appalled that more than 50,000 animals are put to death each year in city shelters, activists have forced both the state and city to ease rules for pet adoption.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1997
In the continuing controversy over whether an Encino dog was skinned alive by humans or killed by a coyote, a Los Angeles city councilwoman called Tuesday for an investigation of the Department of Animal Services. In calling for the inquiry, Councilwoman Jackie Goldberg cited contradictory conclusions reached by Animal Services and independent veterinarians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1999 | IRENE GARCIA
The city Department of Animal Services will hold a public hearing tonight to discuss the proposed pet overpopulation ordinance, which would make it illegal in Los Angeles to own an unsterilized animal without permits. Under the ordinance, owners of unsterilized cats or dogs would be required to pay $100 a year for a permit. Breeders would pay an additional $200 a year for a breeder's license.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1999 | CAITLIN LIU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Putting the ghost of Pal the Pug to rest, at least for now, a judge threw out the remainder of a lawsuit Thursday filed by a veterinarian against Los Angeles Department of Animal Services officers. The dog, who belonged to an Encino resident, was found, barely alive, in April 1997, his skin torn off. Dr. Melvyn Richkind said the dog had been skinned alive by someone with a knife, but animal services officers said he had been attacked by a coyote. Pal's death caused an uproar across Los Angeles.
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