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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1990 | JANE FRITSCH and LARRY STAMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Mayor Tom Bradley on Friday appointed Lillian Kawasaki, a Los Angeles Harbor Department employee, to head the city's new Department of Environmental Affairs. Kawasaki, 39, is the first Asian-American department chief in the city's history, Bradley said. Kawasaki, of Fountain Valley, has worked for the Harbor Department since 1978, beginning as a port environmental scientist.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1990 | JANE FRITSCH and LARRY STAMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Fountain Valley woman has become the first Asian-American to be named as head of a city of Los Angeles department. Lillian Kawasaki, 39, who has worked for the Los Angeles Harbor Department since 1978, was named by Mayor Tom Bradley on Friday to head the new Department of Environmental Affairs. The department, created last spring over Bradley's opposition, will have an initial annual budget of $1 million and a staff of 20. Kawasaki's salary will be $82,000 a year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1990 | JANE FRITSCH and LARRY STAMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Fountain Valley woman has become the first Asian-American to be named as head of a city of Los Angeles department. Lillian Kawasaki, 39, who has worked for the Los Angeles Harbor Department since 1978, was named by Mayor Tom Bradley on Friday to head the new Department of Environmental Affairs. The department, created last spring over Bradley's opposition, will have an initial annual budget of $1 million and a staff of 20. Kawasaki's salary will be $82,000 a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1990 | JANE FRITSCH and LARRY STAMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Mayor Tom Bradley on Friday appointed Lillian Kawasaki, a Los Angeles Harbor Department employee, to head the city's new Department of Environmental Affairs. Kawasaki, 39, is the first Asian-American department chief in the city's history, Bradley said. Kawasaki, of Fountain Valley, has worked for the Harbor Department since 1978, beginning as a port environmental scientist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hazardous materials from buildings damaged during the Los Angeles riots will be hauled away by licensed contractors starting Friday. City officials said Wednesday that inspections by county and city firefighters discovered hazardous materials in the ruins of 71 of 1,035 sites struck by arsonists. Toxic items ranged from solvents to used oil. Lillian Y.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1992
Hazardous materials from buildings damaged during the Los Angeles riots will be hauled away by licensed contractors starting Friday. City officials said Wednesday that inspections by county and city firefighters discovered hazardous materials in the ruins of 71 of 1,035 sites struck by arsonists. Toxics ranged from solvents to used oil. Lillian Y.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1996 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Here we are, kids, closing in on school vacation, and many of you haven't a clue what you will be doing this summer. Instead of hanging around the house or the mall, why not consider doing some environmental volunteer work? You don't have to go to Brazil, according to Jon Earl, a local environmental educator. "This city is alive," he points out to the youthful volunteers he sends to help with environmental restoration projects all over the area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2000 | DAN GORDON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Bradley Landfill and Recycling Center is a $50-million-a-year business with 70 full-time employees and a customer base that includes the city of Los Angeles. But for the man charged with managing the site, conventional business concerns only begin to fill the job description. For at least three hours a day, Scott Tignac dons hard hat and Redwing steel-toed boots, hops into his Ford F-350 pickup truck and observes the bustling waste disposal and recycling activities around the 209-acre site.
NEWS
August 7, 1991 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the automotive industry's early days, they were perceived as feminine cars: Quiet, gentle and limited in power when compared to the sputtering internal-combustion "masculine" counterparts that had to be cranked into action. Then they settled in as a hobby for back-yard mechanics who liked the mechanical tinkering of replacing the gasoline engine with an electric motor.
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