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Los Angeles Development And Redevelopment

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NEWS
August 30, 1992 | FRANK CLIFFORD and RICH CONNELL and STEPHEN BRAUN and Andrea Ford, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Somehow, somewhere along the line, connections had been frayed and confidence lost. Conceived in the ashes of Watts, this was supposed to be a municipal administration built to absorb ethnic shocks. In a city of so many colors, of so much wealth and poverty, it was expected to keep the peace. But on a single evening in late April, the flames that lighted the Los Angeles sky revealed that despite its multiracial hues, Mayor Tom Bradley's model City Hall was powerless to keep the lid on.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2001 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Unified School District's month-old deal to buy the famed Ambassador Hotel and put a school on the property appeared to be teetering Tuesday after a federal judge ordered the owners to negotiate with another potential buyer. City and school district officials reacted angrily to the offer by a Beverly Hills housing developer to pay $15 million more than the district is offering for the 80-year-old Wilshire Boulevard landmark, which is now abandoned and in bankruptcy.
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SPORTS
November 17, 1990 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ascot Park, the busiest dirt race track in America for 33 years, comes to the finish line Thursday. The 50th annual Turkey Night Grand Prix for United States Auto Club midget cars figures to be the last of more than 5,000 main events held since the track opened at 182nd and Vermont Avenue in 1957.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2001 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Board of Public Works on Monday gave the final go-ahead for a beautification project that is to act as a Gateway to Hollywood: a 30-foot-high glass tower and a large fountain on the median where Franklin and Wilcox avenues meet Cahuenga Boulevard. Supporters say the Gateway project, to cost an estimated $658,000 in private and public money, will help that portion of Hollywood continue its winning battle against prostitution and drug dealing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2000 | GINA PICCALO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Los Angeles city officials have announced the initial scope of a study to determine the health and safety risks posed by an earthquake fault and pockets of methane gas reportedly under the controversial Playa Vista project on the Westside. The study is set to begin in August and is expected to take at least four months. It will focus on the area where the first 3,246 houses will be built, on 169 acres of the overall 1,087-acre residential and commercial project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2000 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stepping into the middle of a dispute between a hillside developer and Pacific Palisades residents, Los Angeles officials have begun erecting a $150,000 safety fence between a cliff and nearby homes. Officials said Tuesday that they took the unusual step of hiring a private contractor to build the wall after developer Nasser Ahdoot failed to meet a deadline last week to construct it himself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1991 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 85 people gathered Monday in sweltering midday heat to dedicate the proposed Fossil Ridge paleontological park in the mountains above Sherman Oaks. Actor Ed Asner and Los Angeles City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky were among a host of speakers to laud the plan for a trail and visitor center that would make Fossil Ridge--a brushy promontory embedded with remains of ancient fish, mammals and plants--an educational resource for schoolchildren and other area residents.
NEWS
July 5, 1993 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese golf tycoon Minoru Isutani may have been vanquished at Pebble Beach, but now he's back. Contrary to rumors of his financial demise, Isutani's corporate entity, Cosmo World, is still twitching in Los Angeles, where the controversial developer is forging ahead with plans to carve a championship golf course out of an ecologically sensitive wetlands tract. He is also fresh in the mind of the FBI, which is investigating Isutani for money laundering.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1997 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The signs are all there, on banners, buses and the Cahuenga Pass electronic billboard--the Hollywood Bowl season has arrived. There will be fireworks almost every weekend, appearances by the likes of Simon Rattle and Dr. John, Frederica von Stade and Patti Labelle, Benny Carter and John Williams--a wall-to-wall summer of country, rock, jazz, pops and classical programming. But with all of that comes the eye-rolling ambivalence that haunts this famous attraction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1988 | GEORGE RAMOS
Near Sunset Boulevard and Figueroa Street, just north of downtown Los Angeles, there is a flurry of construction work taking place these days. More than 400 apartments are being built to meet the growing demand for housing in the area. But in the midst of the hammering and sawing, a piece of vacant land at 821 W. Sunset Blvd. remains untouched--dwarfed by the activity around it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2001 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new plan by City Councilwoman Jan Perry to clean up the streets of skid row in downtown Los Angeles has been praised by a wide range of interests, but criticized by civil libertarians who worry that the dispossessed may be needlessly rousted from their precarious sidewalk encampments. "This is not about moving people. This is not about the police," said Perry, flanked by about two dozen social service providers. "This is about protecting people's health."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2001 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the surprise announcement Sunday that the two pastors at the Echo Park temple started by revivalist Aimee Semple McPherson have resigned, a bitter fight to save the building's historic interior appears to be over. Pastors Ed and Ivy Stanton are leaving after two years marked by bitter squabbles over the future of Angelus Temple, a building with national historic landmark status that serves as the headquarters for the International Foursquare Gospel denomination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coalition of homeowner activists has sued Los Angeles, claiming the city's plan to accommodate 611,000 more residents by the year 2010 fails to adequately protect existing Angelenos from traffic gridlock, an attorney said Monday. The lawsuit, filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court by the Federation of Hillside and Canyon Assns. and the Coalition Against the Pipeline, also alleges the city has insufficient water, sewage facilities and open space to accommodate the city's projected growth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2001 | MITCHELL LANDSBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A lesser billionaire than Rupert Murdoch or Phil Anschutz might have thought twice about comparing a proposed entertainment district in downtown Los Angeles to New York's Times Square. It is a bit brash, after all, to put a 4-million-square-foot project built around one large hotel and theater in the same league as the granddaddy of all American entertainment meccas, with its 40 live theaters, 12,500 hotel rooms, 250 restaurants and 21 million square feet of office space alone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2001 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday gave final approval to developers' plans to build a $1-billion shopping, dining and entertainment district around Staples Center, while putting off the tougher question of whether to spend millions of dollars in public funds to help underwrite a high-rise hotel on the site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2001 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to bolster and reshape the city's core, the Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday will consider approving an eight-year plan to transform 27 acres of parking lots and ramshackle buildings around Staples Center into a shopping, dining and entertainment district that would be a West Coast version of Times Square.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1999 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Art Center College of Design, one of the nation's most prominent art schools, said it is considering the former Terminal Annex post office in downtown Los Angeles as a new home for its 1,700 full-time students and faculty. The potential move, prompted by the school's need to expand, could prove a major boost for downtown Los Angeles as it struggles to reinvent itself as a regional center for culture and entertainment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It looks like something more likely to be seen at Cape Canaveral than on a hilltop next to the downtown business district. No wonder the 1,100-foot-tall, rocket engine-shaped "monument" to Los Angeles that a Culver City artist and a West Los Angeles developer want to build was launching so much debate Thursday. The proposed spiral tower would be topped with a bronze sculpture of a sword-waving angel that would be twice the size of the Statue of Liberty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2001 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles city official canceled a hastily called committee hearing Tuesday on a proposed $1-billion development next to Staples Center after members of the news media complained that the meeting's agenda was not properly posted. Members of the City Hall press corps voiced concerns that the city clerk's office did not follow provisions of the Brown Act--California's open meeting law--when distributing the agenda for the City Council's Planning and Land Use Management Committee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2001 | MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Latino advocacy group is drafting a proposal to complete the stalled Belmont Learning Complex, solve its environmental problems and turn the campus near downtown Los Angeles into a privately run charter high school.
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