Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLos Angeles Disasters
IN THE NEWS

Los Angeles Disasters

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1997 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who needs special effects when there's L.A.? Real life here is better, as Paula Lumbard is proving. The owner of a Burbank video archive is doing brisk business licensing real-life footage of L.A. catastrophes, large and small, for television and movies. Need a fire, a riot or a shootout? L.A.'s the place, and Lumbard has the footage, supplied in part by the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. "The catastrophes and the drama of L.A. . . .
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2011 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
The city of Los Angeles is unprepared to meet the needs of the disabled in the case of a disaster and is discriminating against them by failing to include the disabled in its emergency preparedness plans, a federal judge ruled Friday. Siding with disability-rights groups who sued the city on behalf of an estimated 800,000 disabled L.A. residents, U.S. District Court Judge Consuelo B. Marshall found that Los Angeles doesn't have a plan to notify and evacuate the disabled or provide them with transportation and shelter in a disaster.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 27, 1994
Disaster relief agencies continue to do brisk business two months after the Jan. 17 Northridge earthquake, federal and state officials say. Aid application deadline is now May 17. The joint federal-state disaster office on the Westside is at 1901 S. Bundy Drive in Los Angeles. Information: (800) 525-0321.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2009 | Phil Willon
Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa on Thursday officially opened the city's new $107-million, high-tech Emergency Operations Center, the nerve center where officials will coordinate the city's response to major earthquakes, wildfires, acts of terrorism and other potential disasters and public safety threats. The new downtown building replaces the cramped, outdated operations center that was in the basement of a City Hall building. The new center on East Temple Street, east of the federal courthouse, was paid for with funds from Proposition Q, a $600-million public safety bond measure approved by L.A. voters in 2002.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2011 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
The city of Los Angeles is unprepared to meet the needs of the disabled in the case of a disaster and is discriminating against them by failing to include the disabled in its emergency preparedness plans, a federal judge ruled Friday. Siding with disability-rights groups who sued the city on behalf of an estimated 800,000 disabled L.A. residents, U.S. District Court Judge Consuelo B. Marshall found that Los Angeles doesn't have a plan to notify and evacuate the disabled or provide them with transportation and shelter in a disaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1992
Disaster Service Centers that were set up in North Hollywood, Malibu and Thousand Oaks to accept applications for assistance from individuals, families and business owners affected by the storms that hit last month will close today. Residents who suffered damage can continue to register for possible assistance through April 27 by calling (800) 462-9029 Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2009 | Phil Willon
Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa on Thursday officially opened the city's new $107-million, high-tech Emergency Operations Center, the nerve center where officials will coordinate the city's response to major earthquakes, wildfires, acts of terrorism and other potential disasters and public safety threats. The new downtown building replaces the cramped, outdated operations center that was in the basement of a City Hall building. The new center on East Temple Street, east of the federal courthouse, was paid for with funds from Proposition Q, a $600-million public safety bond measure approved by L.A. voters in 2002.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1997 | GAR ANTHONY HAYWOOD, Gar Anthony Haywood is a Los Angeles novelist and screenwriter whose latest Aaron Gunner mystery, "When Last Seen Alive," will be published by G.P. Putnam's Sons in January
I recently read an article in The Times relating the dismal turnout at an El Nino preparedness workshop in San Pedro put on by the Department of Public Works. A crowd of several hundred had been expected, and only 28 people showed up. The event's organizers were flabbergasted, and after reading the article, I was too, though for a different reason.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1994 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Luis De Mata made his way down La Cienega Boulevard, an umbrella aloft in one hand, his sample ballot in the other. He wondered out loud if the rain would stop people from voting. "People will find any excuse not to come out and vote," he would muse later. "It makes me feel sad in a way." No quirk in the pantheon of Los Angeles disasters would have stopped De Mata, a 38-year-old Guatemalan-born hairdresser and newly minted U.S. citizen, from his civic duty Tuesday.
OPINION
August 16, 1998 | Mike Davis, Mike Davis is the author of "City of Quartz: Excavating the Future of Los Angeles." This is an excerpt from his new book "Ecology of Fear: Los Angeles and the Imagination of Disaster." A review of the work appears in today's Book Review
The City of Angeles is unique not simply in the frequency of its fictional destruction, but the pleasure that such apocalypses provide to readers and movie audiences. No other city seems to excite such dark rapture. The tidal waves, killer bees, H-bombs and viruses that occasionally annihilate Seattle, Houston, Chicago or San Francisco produce a different kind of frisson, an enjoyment edged with horror and awe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1997 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who needs special effects when there's L.A.? Real life here is better, as Paula Lumbard is proving. The owner of a Burbank video archive is doing brisk business licensing real-life footage of L.A. catastrophes, large and small, for television and movies. Need a fire, a riot or a shootout? L.A.'s the place, and Lumbard has the footage, supplied in part by the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. "The catastrophes and the drama of L.A. . . .
NEWS
March 27, 1994
Disaster relief agencies continue to do brisk business two months after the Jan. 17 Northridge earthquake, federal and state officials say. Aid application deadline is now May 17. The joint federal-state disaster office on the Westside is at 1901 S. Bundy Drive in Los Angeles. Information: (800) 525-0321.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1992
Disaster Service Centers that were set up in North Hollywood, Malibu and Thousand Oaks to accept applications for assistance from individuals, families and business owners affected by the storms that hit last month will close today. Residents who suffered damage can continue to register for possible assistance through April 27 by calling (800) 462-9029 Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
OPINION
January 30, 1994 | Steve Proffitt, Steve Proffitt is a producer for Fox News and a contributor to National Public Radio's "All Things Considered" and "Morning Edition." He spoke in a conference call with John Gregory Dunne, in New York, and Dominick Dunne, at the Chateau Marmont in Los Angeles.
In the 1960s and '70s, Dominick Dunne and his younger brother, John Gregory, pretty much owned this town. Sons of a well-to-do Connecticut family--"We were like minor-league Kennedys," Dominick once wrote--they came to Los Angeles and prospered. Dominick became a movie producer. John, with his wife, writer Joan Didion, crafted novels and screenplays, earning literary kudos and lots of Hollywood lucre.
NEWS
December 18, 1994 | RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decade after crack cocaine first flooded the streets of Los Angeles, its legacy of destruction ranks among the most deadly, costly and socially upending catastrophes to confront the nation's most populous county. Since 1984, crack has destroyed one undernourished neighborhood after another, devouring countless souls who have succumbed to its seductively cheap price and powerful high. But the crisis has not been the sole province of junkies, or the exclusive headache of police and bureaucrats.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|