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Los Angeles Earthquakes

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1987
These are schools that said they would close, but there may be others that could not be reached. Students and faculty should check with officials for confirmation of other closings. COLLEGES All University of California main campuses open Thursday and today; UCLA's downtown Extension building at 9th and Grand will be closed at least through the weekend.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Matt Stevens, This post had been corrected. See note below for details
The magnitude 4.4 earthquake that hit near Westwood on Monday morning was 900 times weaker than the 6.7 Northridge earthquake in 1994 and lasted only a fraction of a second, Caltech seismologist Egill Hauksson said. The Northridge quake killed 57 people and lasted up to eight seconds, Hauksson said. Monday's quake struck the northern edge of the Santa Monica Mountains, an area that has not seen much recent seismological activity.  LIVE BLOG: 4.4 earthquake strikes Los Angeles “The location is somewhat surprising.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1987
The main dangers are collapsing bridges or overpasses, collapsed structures that become obstacles, flying tree limbs and fallen power lines. Flying glass is especially dangerous on surface streets. WHEN THE EARTHQUAKE STRIKES Don't panic because you feel you're losing control. Avoid any abrupt maneuvering of your vehicle; don't slam on the brakes or turn the steering wheel sharply in either direction. Slow down. Increase your distance from the vehicle in front of you.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz, Rong-Gong Lin II and Matt Stevens, This post had been corrected. See note below for details
Seismologists say Monday's magnitude 4.4 temblor near Westwood could mark the beginning of the end for L.A.'s years-long "earthquake drought. " Typically, they would expect a 4.4-sized earthquake about once a year in the Los Angeles Basin, but that hasn't happened for years. “We don't know if this is the end of the earthquake drought we've had over the last few years, and we won't know for many months,” said Caltech seismologist Egill Hauksson. FORESHOCK? What the odds are The magnitude 4.4 earthquake that struck near Westwood at 6:25 a.m. is the most significant shake in Southern California since a 5.5 earthquake hit Chino Hills in 2008.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1992
Los Angeles fire officials Friday urged residents to attend an earthquake preparedness fair Sunday, where they will find information and demonstrations on techniques for saving lives during emergencies. The American Red Cross, Southern California Gas Co. and the Los Angeles Unified School District will be among the agencies represented at the fair. Residents will learn what medical supplies they should stock, and about emergency rescue techniques.
NEWS
October 2, 1987 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
Thousands of Latin American immigrants, reminded of disastrous earthquakes in their homelands in recent years, camped out Thursday on the streets, in parks and in parking strips because they were afraid to return to their homes. Many, particularly residents of old downtown apartment buildings, indicated they planned to stay all night. With radios propped up and bedspreads on the grass, some prepared for a stay of one night or more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1987 | SANTIAGO O'DONNELL and JILL STEWART, Times Staff Writers
The lights went out for more than half a million Southern Californians, phone callers could not get through badly overloaded circuits, the San Onofre nuclear power plant issued a precautionary alert and thousands of residents were without gas--needlessly--in the aftermath of the quake. Southern California Gas Co.
NEWS
October 3, 1987 | PATT MORRISON, Times Staff Writer
Some were flagging down water delivery trucks on the streets, while others were stocking up on flashlight batteries and rethinking the value of earthquake insurance. For many more Angelenos, the day after a good-sized earthquake pitched and yawed across the Southland was at least a day for some foresight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1994
Remember the wildfires last autumn? There were several, and each blaze had a name. Collectively, however, the disaster was known as the Southern California firestorm, an important distinction that told folks throughout the nation that the damage was indiscriminate and widespread. Too bad earthquakes are named for their epicenters, or at least for where the experts initially presume the epicenter to be.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1994 | MAGGIE JACKSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Teachers dole out water from thermos jugs in the crumbling classrooms of New York's once-splendid Boys High in the Bedford-Stuyvesant district of Brooklyn. The drinking fountains spout rust. Children go to some schools in rural Alabama where the windows break when it's windy and phys-ed class means studying the rules of the game at your desk, not playing it. There are no gyms. Around the country, students are trying to learn and teachers are trying to teach in schools without the basics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1992
Los Angeles fire officials Friday urged residents to attend an earthquake preparedness fair Sunday, where they will find information and demonstrations on techniques for saving lives during emergencies. The American Red Cross, Southern California Gas Co. and the Los Angeles Unified School District will be among the agencies represented at the fair. Residents will learn what medical supplies they should stock, and about emergency rescue techniques.
NEWS
October 5, 1987 | MARY LOU FULTON, Times Staff Writer
Oscar and Maria Alicia Flores were asleep on green cots next to their two children in a shelter for those left homeless by Thursday's big temblor when the Earth shook again early Sunday. Children screamed as tiles fell from the darkened ceiling of the Whittier Community Center's gymnasium as the aftershock hit. Red Cross volunteers hustled 67 panicked people to an adjacent field, where they stayed while officials inspected the building.
NEWS
October 5, 1987 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Undaunted by apocalyptic tremors and crumbling walls, parishioners at some hard-hit San Gabriel Valley churches gathered in makeshift quarters Sunday morning to give thanks and assess damages. Sermon topics stressed trust and hope over fire and brimstone. Some religious leaders reached for earthquake metaphors to make their point.
NEWS
October 4, 1987 | MARY LOU FULTON, Times Staff Writer
A fluorescent yellow sign glowed Saturday from Janet Beauty Supply behind the cordoned sidewalks of Uptown Whittier: "Quake Sale--25% Off." Up the street at the Beds and Brass Mattress Outlet, a 10% off "Shake It Up" sale was promoted in script scrawled in spray paint across boarded up windows. And the T-Shirt Shop was open at 8:30 a.m., the first in this town--the place hardest hit by Thursday's earthquake--to sell the inevitable "I Survived the Whittier Earthquake" T-shirts.
NEWS
October 4, 1987 | SCOTT HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
As far as Los Angeles' skyline was concerned, it was no big deal. The modern skyscrapers trembled a bit during Thursday's 6.1 earthquake, then went on about the business of being there. The people inside, the engineers suggest, felt more strain than the buildings. The structural engineers expected nothing less. And when the San Andreas Fault unleashes its monster 8.0-plus quake, as seismologists predict, more glass will shatter, more bookcases will tumble, more ceilings will crumble.
NEWS
October 3, 1987 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II and KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writers
As scientists from as far away as Colorado rushed to Los Angeles to study Thursday's 6.1 earthquake, seismologists Friday continued to encounter surprises surrounding the jolt. The earthquake inexplicably has been followed by an unusually low number of severe aftershocks, said Caltech seismologist Kate Hutton.
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