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Los Angeles Economic Development Corp

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BUSINESS
December 4, 2000 | Stephen Gregory
Southern California's economy is expected to continue growing next year but at a considerably slower rate than it did this year, the Los Angeles Economic Development Corp. is expected to report Tuesday. In its 2001-2002 forecast, the region's economic think tank also predicts higher overhead costs for businesses, higher housing costs and creeping inflation on consumer goods.
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BUSINESS
June 29, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
California's film tax credit program is giving taxpayers a bang for their buck. So says a newly released study by the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp., which shows the state's tax credit program pumped $3.8 billion into the California economy and created more than 20,000 jobs in the last two years. Based on an analysis of expenditures from nine projects that received film tax credits from the state in the first two years of the program, the LAEDC found that for each tax dollar allocated, the local and state governments get back at least $1.13 in tax revenue and the total gross domestic product in the state increases $8.48.
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BUSINESS
June 15, 2010 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Jack Kyser, the ever-quotable dean of Southern California economists, is retiring from the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. after decades of postulating about the many diverse sectors that make up the California economy. Although he's leaving during one of the worst economic downturns the region has ever seen, Kyser, 76, says he is optimistic about the future of Southern California. "Los Angeles' best days are still ahead of it — if we manage the economy effectively," said Kyser, founding economist at the LAEDC, which was created to attract and retain jobs in the region.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2011 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Film and television production in Los Angeles could help rouse the area from its economic stupor, although growth will be slow this year and next, according to a forecast scheduled to be released Wednesday by the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. "We're looking at an economy that is poised to start to growing again in 2011," said Nancy Sidhu, chief economist of the LAEDC. The motion picture and TV production sector added 16,500 jobs in 2010, becoming one of the fastest-growing employment sectors, according to the forecast.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2010 | By Richard Verrier
Nancy D. Sidhu is chief economist for the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp., a private research and business development group that prepares economic forecasts of national, regional and local business trends. A former economics professor and corporate planner with Inland Steel Industries in Chicago, Sidhu moved to California in 1987 from the Midwest, first to work at Toyota Motor Sales before joining Bank of America as a senior economist. Sidhu joined the LAEDC in 2000 and eight years later succeeded longtime forecaster Jack Kyser, now the group's founding economist.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2011 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Film and television production in Los Angeles could help rouse the area from its economic stupor, although growth will be slow this year and next, according to a forecast scheduled to be released Wednesday by the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. "We're looking at an economy that is poised to start to growing again in 2011," said Nancy Sidhu, chief economist of the LAEDC. The motion picture and TV production sector added 16,500 jobs in 2010, becoming one of the fastest-growing employment sectors, according to the forecast.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
California's film tax credit program is giving taxpayers a bang for their buck. So says a newly released study by the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp., which shows the state's tax credit program pumped $3.8 billion into the California economy and created more than 20,000 jobs in the last two years. Based on an analysis of expenditures from nine projects that received film tax credits from the state in the first two years of the program, the LAEDC found that for each tax dollar allocated, the local and state governments get back at least $1.13 in tax revenue and the total gross domestic product in the state increases $8.48.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2000 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walt Disney Co.'s planned Grand Central Creative Campus in Glendale will eventually employ 10,000 workers and include 3.6 million square feet of offices, sound stages and studio production facilities, according to interviews and documents filed with the city of Glendale. In announcing the development in September, Walt Disney Imagineering executives declined to disclose the project size, the number of employees or the dollar value.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2008 | Cara Mia DiMassa, Times Staff Writer
The developer of the Grand Avenue project in downtown Los Angeles said Monday that completion of the $3-billion redevelopment effort will be delayed until 2012 because of difficulty in obtaining construction loans amid the real estate downturn. The Frank Gehry-designed high-rise project is seen as a linchpin in downtown's revitalization, and the delay is the latest sign that the loft and condo craze in the city center is cooling off.
REAL ESTATE
September 27, 1998
"The Impending Housing Crisis in Southern California: What Does It Mean? Can We Head It Off?" is the topic of a seminar that will presented Thursday by the Los Angeles Economic Development Corp. The seminar will run from 7:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. Thursday at the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce, 350. S. Bixel St. Registration fee is $30. For reservations and information, call (213) 236-4845.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2010 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Jack Kyser, the ever-quotable dean of Southern California economists, is retiring from the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. after decades of postulating about the many diverse sectors that make up the California economy. Although he's leaving during one of the worst economic downturns the region has ever seen, Kyser, 76, says he is optimistic about the future of Southern California. "Los Angeles' best days are still ahead of it — if we manage the economy effectively," said Kyser, founding economist at the LAEDC, which was created to attract and retain jobs in the region.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2010 | By Richard Verrier
Nancy D. Sidhu is chief economist for the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp., a private research and business development group that prepares economic forecasts of national, regional and local business trends. A former economics professor and corporate planner with Inland Steel Industries in Chicago, Sidhu moved to California in 1987 from the Midwest, first to work at Toyota Motor Sales before joining Bank of America as a senior economist. Sidhu joined the LAEDC in 2000 and eight years later succeeded longtime forecaster Jack Kyser, now the group's founding economist.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2000 | Stephen Gregory
Southern California's economy is expected to continue growing next year but at a considerably slower rate than it did this year, the Los Angeles Economic Development Corp. is expected to report Tuesday. In its 2001-2002 forecast, the region's economic think tank also predicts higher overhead costs for businesses, higher housing costs and creeping inflation on consumer goods.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1998 | Patrice Apodaca, Times Staff Writer
A new directory for anyone trying to navigate the local business scene is available from the Los Angeles Economic Development Corp. The Business Resource Guide contains information about business assistance providers throughout the Los Angeles area, including Orange County. The reference includes financing sources, venture capital firms, environmental agencies, economic development organizations and foreign-trade groups.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1998 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the latest economic forecast, Chapman University economists Tuesday predicted that Los Angeles County will create about 77,000 nonfarm payroll jobs this year, growing by 2% from 1997. Chapman analysts say taxable sales in the county should increase by 4.7%, about the same as in 1997. They note, significantly, that Los Angeles County is a more affordable place today, with lower mortgage rates, higher income growth and lower housing prices.
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