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BUSINESS
March 2, 2001 | STUART SILVERSTEIN and MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Harvey Schwartz is preparing for famine in the midst of plenty. Business is booming at his North Hollywood-based 20th Century Props. It provides furniture and more exotic set backgrounds to studios stockpiling films and TV episodes in anticipation of a much-feared entertainment industry strike. But Schwartz knows the good times will end swiftly if the walkout begins. So he's lining up extra bank loans, warning his staff of cutbacks and seeking sales to customers outside Hollywood.
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BUSINESS
February 14, 2013 | by Walter Hamilton
The Special Olympics will have a significant economic benefit for Los Angeles, according to a study released Thursday. The games being held in the summer of 2015 will generate at least $415 million in economic activity for the county, according to the study by a research firm working for the Los Angeles Tourism and Convention Board. The games are expected to draw more than 7,000 athletes and 500,000 spectators to the Los Angeles area, according to the Special Olympics website.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1997 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buoyed by presentations suggesting that Los Angeles is amid a broad, though somewhat uneven, economic recovery, Mayor Richard Riordan on Wednesday told an elite group of civic leaders that the city has rebounded from the 1992 riots but needs to redouble its commitment to education if it hopes to continue growing and prospering.
OPINION
February 7, 2010 | By Russell Goldsmith
More than 7 million Americans have lost their jobs since the recession began in 2007. While the resulting national unemployment rate of almost 10% is daunting, the county of Los Angeles has lost more than 400,000 jobs in the last 2 1/2 years. Joblessness in the city of Los Angeles now stands at a staggering 13%. The situation has finally gotten the attention of public officials. The jobs summit hosted by President Obama late last year, and his plans to put more federal money and tax credits into job creation, are both good signs.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1993 | DANIEL AKST
Having just elected a business-oriented mayor, this is probably a good time for Los Angeles to take stock of its economy. After all, Richard Riordan is a businessman, and whatever he tries to do as mayor will be colored, if not constrained, by the state of local business. Unfortunately, if that is true, the new mayor will be seriously constrained indeed, for an assessment of the local economy presents a grim inventory. Unemployment in Los Angeles through April has averaged 11.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2001 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The mayor of Los Angeles, who is elected tomorrow, will be political leader of a city and region transformed in the last decade. The next mayor will have new challenges but also more power to deal with them than previous mayors have had. Los Angeles, like all of Southern California, has become an international economy. A decade ago, the aerospace-defense industry was this region's largest employer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1992 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time since the recession began more than two years ago, Los Angeles city officials have formally acknowledged that City Hall has tended to impede--rather than promote--economic development. "Economic development concerns are addressed in a piecemeal manner, are often reactive and are administered ineffectually," begins a report by William R. McCarley, the city's chief legislative analyst.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2001 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN and KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For Hollywood's TV and film writers, a probable strike looms like a fast-moving storm on a weather map, roiling emotions and prompting many to take emergency measures. The widespread fear, based on the last Writers Guild of America strike, which lasted five months in 1988, is that writers would drain their bank accounts, go into debt and even lose their houses. And money isn't the only concern. Many fear that a protracted strike would abruptly end careers in a notoriously competitive industry.
OPINION
March 11, 1990
Jane Gebers (letter, March 1) hit the nail on the head--pun intended--by calling for a temporary construction halt. Indeed, nearly all the problems we are facing stem from overpopulation, which we invite by rampant building and development. Unfortunately, the Los Angeles economy seems to be fatally addicted to unbridled growth and no one is offering a rehabilitation program. JAMES PERRY JASTER Canoga Park
BUSINESS
February 16, 2007 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
Pirates are pillaging Los Angeles' economy. At least that's what a publicly funded study to be released today concludes, making the case that bootleg DVDs, CDs, prescription drugs and other merchandise such as handbags cost nine industries across Los Angeles County more than 100,000 jobs and about $5.2 billion in lost sales in 2005. Conducted by the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp., the study lists the motion picture industry as accounting for about half the losses -- $2.
OPINION
November 25, 2006 | Antonio R. Villaraigosa, ANTONIO R. VILLARAIGOSA is the mayor of Los Angeles.
LOS ANGELES remains the entertainment capital of the world. But to keep it that way, we're going to need to roll out the red carpet to the film and TV industries to ensure that they continue shooting here. At the moment, the entertainment industry employs more than 200,000 people in Los Angeles County with quality, middle-class jobs. Production activity contributes more than $25 billion annually to our economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2006 | Duke Helfand and Jeffrey L. Rabin, Times Staff Writers
When he visits Asia next month on his first international trade mission, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa will be accompanied by a delegation of investment bankers, real estate executives, City Council members, small-business people and attorneys from some of the city's most influential law firms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2006 | Nancy Cleeland, Times Staff Writer
Faced with new indications that the Los Angeles economy is heading in a perilous direction, the city's workforce development board gathered together several dozen business and community leaders Thursday to look for ways to help. Los Angeles has numerous economic challenges, including a growing underground economy, a large and poorly educated immigrant workforce, and a widening gap between high-wage and low-wage jobs, according to findings of the city-commissioned Los Angeles Economy Project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2002 | Beth Shuster, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Mayor James K. Hahn, leading a delegation of business executives -- some of whom helped defeat Hollywood and San Fernando Valley secession efforts this month -- on Wednesday helped open doors to China that may benefit those and other L.A. businesses.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2002 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While most of the Los Angeles economy has stagnated since the last recession, one segment is booming, a new analysis contends. The problem is, it's all underground. Cash-pay, off-the-books work is thriving in the region, fed by new business practices, illegal immigration and lax labor law enforcement, according to the Economic Roundtable, a Los Angeles research group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1995
Private business forecasters on Tuesday described the Los Angeles economy as on the mend but encouraged the Los Angeles City Council's budget committee to join Mayor Richard Riordan's call for cutting business-related taxes. "The local economy is on an upward swing, not a rapid swing, but clearly an improvement" after the worst recession since the 1930s, said Lynn Reaser, senior vice president and chief economist for First Interstate Bank.
BUSINESS
March 22, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cable TV Impact on the L.A. Economy: The local cable TV industry contributes $2.4 billion annually toward the local Los Angeles economy, according to a joint study by the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce and the Southern California Cable TV Assn. The figure includes $1.4 billion contributed by local cable TV operators and $1 billion contributed by programming and production firms, the report says.
NEWS
March 8, 2002 | STUART SILVERSTEIN and MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
If the economy were a game show, Southern California's counties might turn to Los Angeles and say: "You are the weakest link." In the business world, though, there is no bullying master of ceremonies to pronounce judgment. Instead, statistics tell the story: The L.A. core has been losing its middle class and providing fewer opportunities for its poor, low-skilled residents. Neighboring counties are gaining good-paying jobs and attracting growth industries such as high technology.
NEWS
February 5, 2002 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reyna Lavariega's parents were too poor to buy a pencil or a notebook. That's why they never sent her to school. As a young adult, she cobbled together as much education as she could in Oaxaca, Mexico. Still, she was barely able to read and write when she joined her husband in Los Angeles 12 years ago. Now Lavariega washes broken stoves and refrigerators for the family appliance repair business, which is run out of the basement of her rented home near MacArthur Park.
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