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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1990 | HELEN BURNSTEIN and RICHARD RIORDAN, Helen Bernstein is president of United Teachers-Los Angeles. Richard Riordan is co-chairman of Kids First , a community-action group for school reform
No one can deny that in Los Angeles, a revolution has begun. This revolution has as its focal point the children of this city and is being waged in the mammoth Los Angeles Unified School District. Its goal is to restructure--not merely reorganize or reshuffle--what does not work.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2009 | Jason Song
A task force charged with recommending improvements to educators' evaluations and instruction in the Los Angeles school district met for the first time Tuesday. The school board narrowly approved the formation of the committee shortly before a Times series examining the difficulties of firing and evaluating teachers was published in May. The nearly 25-member group includes members from unions and the Los Angeles Unified School District, teachers and administrators and is chaired by state Board of Education President Ted Mitchell.
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NEWS
November 9, 1990 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After decades in which many of the best science and math classes were offered in elite private and suburban schools and catered only to highly motivated children with extraordinary IQs, a new trend is emerging. In a growing number of schools, teachers are experimenting with new approaches and materials, turning average and even below-average students into budding young scientists and mathematicians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2001 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Unified School District is targeting 14 of its lowest performing schools for extra help in a move to boost academic performance and forestall state intervention, officials said Monday. The effort is underway as the state Department of Education prepares to send audit teams to evaluate 10 other troubled campuses in the district. All of the schools to be put under new scrutiny serve primarily poor children and receive additional funding through the federal Title I program.
NEWS
November 20, 2000 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Hollywood High School keeps its doors open 12 months a year to ease overcrowding. The year-round schedule allows the campus to run hundreds more students through its cramped classrooms. It also chips away at their education. Teachers skip pages of material, assign less homework and give fewer tests because their school year has been slashed by 17 days. Hundreds of pupils take the Stanford 9 exam shortly after returning from an eight-week vacation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1994
When businessman-philantropist Walter H. Annenberg announced last December that he would donate half a billion dollars to help make education reform a reality, it was an exciting moment for all of those who care about public school education. The donation is the largest ever for education. Now comes even more reason for excitement: Los Angeles education leaders are joining hands to make sure that this city benefits from Annenberg's largess.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1993 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
In the 1960s Fairfax High School was riding high on an academic pinnacle, a proud reflection of a community where students packed advanced placement classes, enriched their studies with drama and music productions and then surged on to college. In January, 1993, the school remains a microcosm of the community--one that has dramatically changed and reflects the myriad disturbing issues confronting public education in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2000 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to raise chronically low test scores, most of Los Angeles' elementary schools are switching to a single reading program that prescribes step-by-step phonics lessons and strictly governs how teachers do their jobs. The Los Angeles Unified School District is following the lead of other major school systems in California by embracing Open Court, a heavily scripted program that dictates many details of daily instruction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1993 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three days after the launch of a citywide publicity campaign, the leader of an ambitious school reform plan on Sunday preached his message of revamping the Los Angeles public education system to a Pacoima church congregation. Robert E. Wycoff, chief operating officer of Arco, told a jammed, largely Latino Mass at Mary Immaculate Catholic Church that the best hope to jolt local schools out of their present crisis is through the high-powered coalition that he heads.
NEWS
July 28, 1997 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Sophomore Angeles Herrera hurries down the halls of Fremont High School with a single slim notebook tucked under her arm. She carries no textbooks because she has none. Textbooks remain the essential guide to education, second in importance only to competent teachers. But book shortages have become so common in big-city high schools that Angeles doesn't know she should expect more--that, in fact, state law guarantees her a text for every class.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2001 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Los Angeles Unified elementary schools made strong gains on the Stanford 9 test for the third consecutive year, but the district's high schools once again failed to improve, according to data released Tuesday. Students in grades 2 to 5 showed consistent improvement on the state's basic skills exam. That progress appeared to reach middle schools for the first time, where sixth-grade gains resembled those in the elementary schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2001 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
A 5-year-old order to improve special education in Los Angeles touched off a legal brawl Tuesday as school officials and advocates for disabled students headed back to federal court amid personal attacks and charges of bad faith.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2001 | MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A grand jury report that says the Los Angeles Unified School District's central leadership is out of touch with parents and students provides more evidence that the district should be split up, school secessionists said Monday. The report stops short of endorsing a school district breakup, but "it's another entity expressing many of the same things that we've said," said Stephanie Carter, a leader of FREE, a group working to break off San Fernando Valley schools from Los Angeles Unified.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Mayor Richard Riordan celebrated the first expansion of LA's BEST since 1999 in a visit to Pacoima Elementary School on Wednesday afternoon. LA's BEST, which stands for Better Educated Students for Tomorrow, is a free program that offers a set curriculum for students ages 5 to 12. Twenty-five schools in the Valley are LA's BEST sites. Only year-round schools will offer the program during summer vacation months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2001 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Weylin Etra had spent more than two years at a private school in Santa Monica when his teacher and parents spotted some serious physical and learning problems. His parents had him assessed at their local Los Angeles Unified School District campus, and within months Weylin began receiving weekly occupational therapy and special education classes--all courtesy of the district and even as he continued happily to attend private school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2001 | MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles schools budget proposed Thursday by Supt. Roy Romer would reduce staff at the district's central and outlying offices, rein in spending on special education and slow the hiring of high school teachers. It also would pay for nearly 500 "coaches" at a cost of $40 million to train teachers to better teach math and reading in elementary and middle schools. The $5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1992 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Unified School District officials, tackling a broad but vague new law that allows campuses to free themselves from local district control, said Thursday that they are embarking on an educational reform test in which there are pages of thorny questions but no ready answers. "There are no answers--it's uncharted grounds," Joseph Rao of the district's office of instruction told school board members at a meeting of the Education Reform, Restructuring and Curriculum Committee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1999 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When United Airlines decided to adopt a local third-grade class, it assumed it would be easy to give away $1.5 million and provide a decade-long cultural enrichment program led by employee mentors and studded with dazzling field trips. Then reality intervened. School officials did a poor job of advertising the proposal to principals. Medical tests and law enforcement checks of prospective mentors took months to complete.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2001 | JASON SONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Students from 45 Los Angeles high schools will take part in a six-month study designed to increase involvement in the 2001 mayoral election, officials for the Annenberg School for Communication said Friday. Students will have opportunities to meet and interview candidates, participate in public forums, write op-ed essays and make video documentaries as part of the Los Angeles Student Voice program, which will be administered by the Annenberg school, which is located at USC.
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