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Los Angeles Elections 1992

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1992 | JOHN SCHWADA
Morton S. Diamond, a 60-year-old free-lance paralegal from Canoga Park, has declared his intention to raise money to run for the seat now held by Los Angeles City Councilwoman Joy Picus. As part of his fledgling campaign, Diamond has signed a contract pledging to serve only two four-year terms if elected. Diamond also was a candidate in 1989 for the 3rd District seat Picus holds. He placed fifth with 1,500 votes, compared to 14,500 for Picus, who won handily.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 21, 1993 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
One candidate promises to spend at least an hour a week teaching in a public classroom. Another buys full-page newspaper ads to push for the breakup of the giant Los Angeles Unified School District. Still another calls for metal detectors at every high school and middle school campus. And somebody else advocates stripping funds from the city's redevelopment agency to pay for more textbooks, smaller classes and higher teacher salaries. But these are not candidates for the Board of Education.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1992 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Banking on the public's fear of rising crime, the Los Angeles City Council gave final approval Tuesday to November ballot measures to pay for 1,000 additional police officers and to overhaul the city's emergency communications system. One of the measures would tax property owners to raise $101 million to hire 1,000 police officers and 200 civilian personnel for the Police Department and pay their pension and retirement benefits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1993 | RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayoral candidate and state Assemblyman Richard Katz's campaign fund-raising chief is part of a team competing to build a multibillion-dollar, 71-mile rail project--a decision Katz could significantly influence if elected mayor of Los Angeles. Attorney Peter D. Kelly, a former state Democratic Party chairman, is one of Katz's top campaign strategists who, among other tasks, is coordinating a major fund-raiser for the assemblyman next month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1992 | BILL BOYARSKY
Two rallies this weekend brought home the rapidly changing nature of Southland politics. One of them was for Democratic women candidates, especially two running for Senate, Rep. Barbara Boxer and former San Francisco Mayor Dianne Feinstein. The other was sponsored by Latino politicians campaigning for Charter Amendment F, the measure to increase civilian control of the Los Angeles Police Department. Rallies are an antiquated form of political communication.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1992 | BILL BOYARSKY
When Tom Bradley was first elected mayor in 1973, his campaign was powered by South-Central Los Angeles blacks and Westside and San Fernando Valley Jews. Early in the campaign, these two groups, brought together by a common concern over civil rights, realized that they didn't have enough votes to win. So they expanded their base. Homeowner groups, angry over development, joined. Latino leaders signed up, too, hoping for more of a voice in City Hall. This is called coalition politics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1992 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Editor's note: Because of a production error, portions of this story published Friday were omitted from some editions of The Times. It is reprinted here in its entirety. Even from the sidelines, where he insists he will stay, Los Angeles Police Chief-designate Willie L. Williams has already become a controversial player in the campaign to give City Hall greater authority over the Police Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1992 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his first campaign debate with Warren Christopher, Police Chief Daryl F. Gates told a San Fernando Valley audience Tuesday that it is not true--as the commission Christopher headed reported--that his department is racist and brutal. "Sure we've had some abuse, but all of those problems have been taken care of," Gates said. "The Christopher Commission said the department is racist and brutal. Folks, it's simply not true. "I've said, 'Show me the evidence.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1992 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the election only six weeks away, activists on both sides of the campaign to reform the Los Angeles Police Department are grappling with how to woo the city's Latino voters, who make up a small but possibly key segment of the electorate.
NEWS
April 16, 1992 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Willie L. Williams had barely landed in Los Angeles on Wednesday when warring factions in the battle over police reform each tried to cast him as a symbol of their point of view. The powerful Police Protective League was first to hail Williams' expected appointment as new Los Angeles police chief as a vindication of arguments against the proposed reforms.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1993 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Of the 52 candidates for mayor of Los Angeles, only one--City Coucilman Joel Wachs--counts the art community as a major source of support. And his mayoral campaign reaches well beyond Southern California. A coast-to-coast spate of fund-raisers for Wachs includes everything from cocktail parties sponsored by Los Angeles' cultural movers and shakers to a gathering of New York artists in a TriBeCa restaurant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1992 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles City Councilman Joel Wachs on Monday accused Councilman Michael Woo--a rival candidate for mayor--of hypocrisy for saying he might take advantage of an opening in the city ethics law to exceed the $2-million campaign spending limit. Wachs said that Woo, as the self-described father of the ethics code, should abide by its spirit, not merely the letter of the law.
NEWS
December 17, 1992 | TIM RUTTEN
As Los Angeles careens toward its first post-riot mayoral election, there are two political possibilities: One is that the city will begin to confront the questions of economic justice and political disintegration which, left unanswered for too many years, have brought us to this point. The other is that voters, a majority of whom still are white, English-speaking and relatively affluent, will continue to ignore those issues and simply find somebody to blame.
NEWS
November 19, 1992 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Riordan, one of the city's wealthiest and most influential private citizens, announced Wednesday that he will be a candidate for mayor of Los Angeles, running on a platform that stresses his skills as a businessman "with a heart" while calling for tougher law enforcement and a government friendlier to business. "As mayor I will get tough on crime, drug dealing, gangs and violence," Riordan said at a news conference at a Studio City restaurant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1992 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Congresswoman Yvonne Brathwaite Burke stretched her lead over state Sen. Diane Watson to 2,246 votes Thursday, with an estimated 5,000 ballots still to be counted in the race to elect the first African-American to the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors. Neither candidate was ready to declare a winner, choosing to wait for the final tally, which could come at the earliest on Monday, nearly two weeks after the Nov. 3 election.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1992 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Fernando Valley voters stuck to their property tax-wary roots and were a key factor in the defeat of a citywide measure that would have reinforced the thin blue line of the Los Angeles Police Department with 1,000 new officers. But, in a remarkable performance that demonstrated his broad suburban appeal, Democratic President-elect Bill Clinton outdrew incumbent George Bush in many communities and areas of the Valley that often lean toward Republicans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1992
Mayor Tom Bradley, lawyer Warren Christopher and Urban League President John Mack joined other government and civic leaders Saturday to open the South-Central Los Angeles headquarters of the campaign for greater civilian oversight of the Los Angeles Police Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1992 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite its defeat at the polls, the strong showing Tuesday of a ballot measure to expand the Los Angeles Police Department will inspire renewed efforts to add police to the 7,800-officer force and will become a central issue in the upcoming mayor's race, City Hall officials said Wednesday.
NEWS
November 4, 1992 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just a block from the spot where the first stones of the spring riots were thrown, Jewel Charlot had the honor of casting the first ballot Tuesday morning, a quiet act repeated thousands of times across South Los Angeles by people hungry for meaningful change. "The further we get from the riots, the more people get back into the old complacency, their apathetic ways," said Charlot, a 57-year-old curriculum adviser for the Los Angeles Unified School District. "We need a change," she continued.
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