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OPINION
December 4, 1994
I'd like to take this opportunity to respond to editorials discussing Fire Department personnel issues (Nov. 19 and 26). While I am the first to acknowledge that there may be individual activities within our department of 3,600 employees that I neither condone nor endorse, I must re-emphasize my commitment to the men and women of this department and to the citizens of Los Angeles. They can rest assured that in the Los Angeles Fire Department public safety comes first. The Nov. 19 editorial was correct in stating I am caught in the cross fire.
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MAGAZINE
March 27, 1988 | Alan Weisman
IN CHEECH MARIN'S den stands an ebony trophy, awarded his movie "Born in East L.A." for Best Picture at the New Latin America Cinema Festival in Cuba. Marin, its star and director, is stunned with gratitude by this honor, a first for a Chicano film. Universal Studios had made him pay his own way to Havana, and now his film is beating "Fatal Attraction" around Latin America. About a Chicano who gets swept up in an INS raid and dumped in Tijuana, "Born in East L.A."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1999 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rodney King drank too much. He drove too fast. He ran from the police and when he was finally cornered, he danced and he swayed and at one point, the Los Angeles police officers would say later, he lunged at an officer. The police struck with their batons. Over and over, they pounded his body. The sergeant shot him with an electric stun gun. They kicked him. He was handcuffed and hogtied and dragged face-down across the gravel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1992 | STEVEN P. ERIE and HAROLD BRACKMAN, Steven P. Erie teaches political science at UC San Diego. He is working on a new book, "Imperial Los Angeles," to be published by Stanford University Press. Historian Harold Brackman is a consultant on intergroup relations for the Simon Wiesenthal Center
To listen to former Pacific Rim boosters who have soured on Los Angeles, "the Big One" already has hit. The twin shocks of recession and riot have shaken the faith in perpetual economic growth and multicultural harmony that have sustained the city for more than 20 years. Pessimistic commentators now embrace the "Blade Runner" scenario, a cinematic nightmare vision of the city's future, as an ominous prophecy that Los Angeles is on the verge of a multicultural meltdown.
NEWS
October 1, 1993
The centerpiece of a pedestrian-friendly development project that links the old and new downtown, the restored Central Library doubles the floor space of the 1926 Goodhue building to 540,000 square feet. The result of a $214-million rehabilitation made possible by a unique private/public partnership, the 8-year project has built the Robert F. Maguire III gardens, a 1.
NEWS
January 10, 1993 | SHAWN HUBLER and STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Whether they have dropped out of high school or invested years in a graduate degree, whether they have struggled to master English or not, California's minorities earn substantially less than Anglos--a disparity that challenges the long-held tenet that education is a key to equality. In fact, the gap between Anglo and minority earnings widens among some of the most educated Californians, a Times analysis of new census statistics shows.
NEWS
April 8, 1993 | LOIS TIMNICK and BERNICE HIRABAYASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
There will be no fire-drill bells. No commands to "drop." But should civil unrest accompany the verdicts in the Rodney G. King civil rights trial, public and private schools on the Westside are prepared to swing into action--quietly and quickly. Nearly all schools have disaster contingency plans, designed initially for earthquakes but applicable to civil disturbances as well. And extra measures will be in place at most facilities, officials said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1990 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
People get tired of reading books. --Vera Rocha, member of the Gabrielino Indian Band It's not Anthropology 101. When students arrive for UCLA Extension's "Prologue to the 1990 Los Angeles Arts Festival," they won't be sitting in a lecture hall. Instead, the course--which begins Saturday as an adjunct to September's Los Angeles Festival--will meet at the First Unitarian Church on 8th Street, the first church to provide sanctuary for Salvadoran refugees.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1992 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Although it's been a less than stellar time for race relations in Los Angeles, one of this city's premier African-American theater artists is having "his best year in a long time." It's not that Shabaka Barry Henley, best known by the single name Shabaka, is taking the troubles lying down. On the contrary, this multitalented actor-director sees them as part of an ongoing process of change--the cause that's long fueled his work.
OPINION
January 7, 1990 | Joel Kotkin, Joel Kotkin is an international fellow at the Pepperdine School of Business and Management and a senior fellow at the Center for the New West
For the last three decades, the racial politics of Southern California--like much of the nation--revolved around black-white issues. But today this biracial focus is being supplanted by a kaleidoscopic politics reflecting an increasingly diverse population. The rise of various ethnic groups, predominantly Asian and Latino, foreshadows the end of the traditional biracial alliance among white liberals, downtown corporate interests and blacks that has controlled Los Angeles politics for 20 years.
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