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ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1987 | RAY LOYND
Just in time for the Pope's visit, the Fringe gives us a play about allegiance to God. T. S. Eliot's poetic drama on Archbishop Becket's 12th-Century martyrdom, "Murder in the Cathedral," is best performed in a church (it indeed opened in one, Canterbury Cathedral in 1935). And the vaulted Gothic ceilings of the 180-seat Shatto Chapel in the First Congregational Church of Los Angeles is an evocative "set" for this Commonwealth Theatre production.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW
The grand finale to summer's arts events comes appropriately at the end of the season when the Pacific-themed Los Angeles Festival officially gets under way Sept. 1. Organizers say the projected $4.5 million festival, which runs through Sept. 17, will include nearly 90 programs, featuring more than 100 performing groups and individual artists in a total of 240 performances and exhibitions. While the 1990 L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1987 | ZAN DUBIN
Poet Naomi Quinonez took a deep breath, raised her book and read a lyrical passage aloud: "Aires Suaves , flautas , ritmos antiguos . Has venido . " "Soft breezes, flutes, ancient rhythms. You have arrived." A lilting Bolivian folk lament filled the air, musicians Mario Torrico and Fernando Popayan tuning in to Quinonez's words and tone to improvise their breathy pan-pipe serenade.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1987 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
Dressed in spectacular silver and gray 18th-Century ruffles, panniers and curled wig--complete with a miniature three-masted sailing ship on top--Rachel Rosenthal sailed up the basement stairs of the Los Angeles Theater Center onto the stage of the Tom Bradley Theatre on Saturday, proclaimed herself "the flower of the Enlightenment" and launched into a sustained arioso.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1987 | HARLOW ROBINSON, Robinson is the author of "Sergei Prokofiev: A Biography," published recently by Viking Press
Bearing enough black magic, violence and sex for several sequels to "The Devils," "The Fiery Angel" flies into town this week. Its arrival may come as a shock to those who know Sergei Prokofiev as the precocious, ironic "bad boy of Russian music." For, in this brooding, demonic and oddly neglected opera, the sunny, sardonic creator of such tuneful crowd-pleasers as the "Lt. Kije" Suite, the "Classical" Symphony and "Cinderella" displays his dark side. It's a Freudian dream come true.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1987 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Rudy Perez, who started the postmodern ball rolling in Los Angeles when he relocated here a decade ago, has recently gotten more than he bargained for: A full-page ad with his name emblazoned next to those of Merce Cunningham, John Cage, Ingmar Bergman and Peter Brook: Is that any way for a struggling choreographer and performance artist to be treated by Los Angeles Festival organizers? Needless to say, he's hardly complaining.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Darn it! I hate to put the knock on a perfectly respectable show like the Mark Taper Forum's "Babbitt: A Marriage," especially when it's ours. But after the exotic stuff we've been seeing at the Los Angeles Festival, it does seem a little, well, average. 'Course, that's what George F. Babbitt is about: being average.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1987 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
From his office at the Walt Disney Studios in Burbank on Thursday, Robert J. Fitzpatrick, director of the Los Angeles Festival, confessed to being "a little battle weary. The festival is less than 10 days old, and it feels more like 10 weeks." The canceling of last Saturday night's performance of Michael Clark & Co. after the 25-year-old British choreographer and dancer came down with a high fever was a downer, Fitzpatrick acknowledged.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1987 | ALAN M. BROWN
"Would we do 'Swan Lake?' Never. Big classical productions are not for us." Francoise Adret, the artistic director of the Lyon Opera Ballet, gives a dismissive wave of her hand. In spite of its staid name, her company, which will dance at the Los Angeles Festival from Tuesday to Sept. 19, is hellbent, it would seem, on being "with it."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1989 | SHAUNA SNOW
Declaring flatly that there would be "no European works at all" at the 1990 Los Angeles Festival, Peter Sellars said Tuesday that he hoped the three-week September event would prove to traditional arts patrons that the kind of work "previously considered the margin was, in fact, the center." "I would like the festival to do for this city things that none of the (existing) institutions in this city can do," he said. "Collective power is what I hope the L.A. Festival will be about."
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