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ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1987 | SYLVIE DRAKE,, Times Theater Writer
It would have been too much to expect for the Los Angeles press corps to fill up Raleigh Studios' spacious sound stage 12 Monday morning, but the reporters who showed up for "The Mahabharata" director Peter Brook's press conference--the first of the Los Angeles Festival--were entirely too few. Seated on the spacious red clay expanse that serves as set for Brook's nine-hour staging of the epic Indian poem, were festival director Robert J.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1987 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
Maguy Marin is the scavenger queen of French movement-theater--a choreographer who pieces together what passes for dancing from bits of eccentric character-gesture and who assembles grandiose, nihilist spectacle from the flotsam and jetsam of European culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1987 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
When almost everything being delivered by the Los Angeles Festival comes under the banner dernier cri , it's more than a little surprising to encounter Urban Bush Women, the New York-based dance-theater company that opened a three-performance run Friday at the Los Angeles Theatre Center. Touted in the program book for its "contemporary idioms," not to mention "the driving immediacy of the drama and wit of the spoken word," the three-year-old troupe all but defies such descriptions.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1987 | ZAN STEWART
There's no denying that classic jazz--which can range from two-beat Dixie tunes belted out by a gregarious ensemble to a stomping shuffle blues crisply delivered by a R&B unit--can be a joyous experience. But the selection of Friday's "Evening of Classic Jazz" at the Embassy Theater during the Los Angeles Festival, with its accent on modern if not avant-garde theater, music and dance, might seem a mystery to some.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1987 | RAY LOYND
Just in time for the Pope's visit, the Fringe gives us a play about allegiance to God. T. S. Eliot's poetic drama on Archbishop Becket's 12th-Century martyrdom, "Murder in the Cathedral," is best performed in a church (it indeed opened in one, Canterbury Cathedral in 1935). And the vaulted Gothic ceilings of the 180-seat Shatto Chapel in the First Congregational Church of Los Angeles is an evocative "set" for this Commonwealth Theatre production.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW
The grand finale to summer's arts events comes appropriately at the end of the season when the Pacific-themed Los Angeles Festival officially gets under way Sept. 1. Organizers say the projected $4.5 million festival, which runs through Sept. 17, will include nearly 90 programs, featuring more than 100 performing groups and individual artists in a total of 240 performances and exhibitions. While the 1990 L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1987 | ALAN M. BROWN
If Los Angeles Festival audiences find Mathilde Monnier and Jean-Francois Duroure's "Duet" spontaneous and refreshingly naive at the Japan America Theatre on Sept. 12, it may be because that dance was their first attempt at collaboration--and choreography. In 1984, the two French dancers went to New York City to study for a year at the Merce Cunningham studio. He was 19 and she was 22. In their shared apartment in the Village, they created the first section of "Duet."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1987 | ZAN DUBIN
Poet Naomi Quinonez took a deep breath, raised her book and read a lyrical passage aloud: "Aires Suaves , flautas , ritmos antiguos . Has venido . " "Soft breezes, flutes, ancient rhythms. You have arrived." A lilting Bolivian folk lament filled the air, musicians Mario Torrico and Fernando Popayan tuning in to Quinonez's words and tone to improvise their breathy pan-pipe serenade.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1987 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
Dressed in spectacular silver and gray 18th-Century ruffles, panniers and curled wig--complete with a miniature three-masted sailing ship on top--Rachel Rosenthal sailed up the basement stairs of the Los Angeles Theater Center onto the stage of the Tom Bradley Theatre on Saturday, proclaimed herself "the flower of the Enlightenment" and launched into a sustained arioso.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1987 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Rudy Perez, who started the postmodern ball rolling in Los Angeles when he relocated here a decade ago, has recently gotten more than he bargained for: A full-page ad with his name emblazoned next to those of Merce Cunningham, John Cage, Ingmar Bergman and Peter Brook: Is that any way for a struggling choreographer and performance artist to be treated by Los Angeles Festival organizers? Needless to say, he's hardly complaining.
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