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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1993 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Conventional wisdom says that the less government intrudes on business, the better business does. But that axiom doesn't hold true for Sherman Oaks Castle Park, a city-owned miniature golf and recreation center that the city began to operate six months ago, after ending a private firm's lease. Since the city of Los Angeles jumped into the miniature golf business, big profits have been par for the course.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
More than 450   medical marijuana shops have filed renewals to pay Los Angeles business taxes this year - more than three times as many as are allowed to stay open under Proposition D. The new numbers won't settle the debate over how many medical marijuana businesses are now operating in Los Angeles. Additional pot shops may be open but have fallen delinquent on their taxes. Some may have never registered to pay taxes at all. But the numbers provide the latest hint at what has happened since Los Angeles voters passed new rules attempting to restrict medical marijuana shops.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1994 | RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the devastating earthquake hit the city, final touches were being put on a seminal, four-month Riordan Administration study of Los Angeles city finances that concludes that aggressive, creative management of city assets and revenues could generate hundreds of millions of dollars in new income over the next several years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2011 | By Paul Pringle and Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
As finance director for the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, Ronald Lederkramer didn't need to do much driving to keep an eye on the stadium's books. But he has charged taxpayers about $7,600 for gasoline since 2008, even for fill-ups near Las Vegas and in Florida and New York. That was enough to drive about 12,000 miles annually in his Infiniti and his Jaguar, which he leased mostly at the public's expense. And on Lederkramer's watch, four other stadium administrators racked up similar bills on the Coliseum's Exxon Mobil account, according to receipts obtained through the California Public Records Act. The managers' jobs required only occasional car trips, typically to nearby destinations such as Staples Center or City Hall, Coliseum officials have said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1995 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the deindustrialized economy of South Los Angeles, where the disappearance of unskilled jobs is routinely blamed for so many social ills, Ralph Littlejohn has his hand in what may be the area's only growth industry: trash. Littlejohn is a strong, diminutive, 52-year-old man who pushes three shopping carts, tied together with ropes and old rags, scavenging for bottles, aluminum cans, newspapers and other recyclable materials.
NEWS
February 19, 1987 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
Costs to build a completed Los Angeles Metro Rail system exceed previous estimates by nearly $1 billion, according to some calculations. A report by the Southern California Rapid Transit District says that officials have identified a route for the commuter line that appears to have the broadest possible community approval, and its price tag is $4.2 billion, up from the $3.3 billion that the RTD has long stated would be the system's total cost.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1988 | SCOTT HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Ambitious plans for a large municipal building, along with a major buildup of Little Tokyo, including a 500-room hotel, more stores, hundreds of apartments, a plaza and a museum--all built as an extension of the Los Angeles Civic Center--took a step forward Tuesday. City Administrative Officer Keith Comrie recommended one of four groups of developers competing to build the 1.25-million-square-foot First Street North project, located on 7.
NEWS
April 25, 1998 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Mayor Richard Riordan proposed licensing cats in the city of Los Angeles earlier this week, he confessed that he does not have a cat. Right--like, big surprise there. Anyone who owns a cat--and we use the term "own" in the most provisional way--will tell you that a cat who lives in a sub-world of his own making, who comes when called only if he feels like it, is not likely to submit to having his neck festooned with a license tag. (So like a dog, cats would think with disdain.
NEWS
June 25, 1995 | TIM MAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's been called a buyout, a payoff, a slush fund and a bribe. But whatever it's labeled, most residents of this eclectic area of horse ranches and blight say that taking $5 million from the city of Los Angeles in exchange for living within smelling distance of Lopez Canyon Landfill was like making a deal with the devil.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1992 | JOHN SCHWADA and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The city's 2-year-old graffiti reward program is almost bankrupt, forcing Los Angeles officials to scramble for new funding to compensate people who aid in apprehending the relentless taggers. Trying to revive a program that has only $1,300 in cash, a City Council panel will consider proposals today that would both reduce the size of individual rewards from $1,000 to $500 and appeal to business leaders to help finance the fund. The program's financial difficulties could not come at a worse time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2011 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles officials produced their financing plan Monday for a downtown Los Angeles NFL stadium and new $275-million wing of the city Convention Center, saying it would protect taxpayers by requiring the developer to absorb a greater share of the costs and risks. Demolishing and rebuilding part of the Convention Center — a move that is central to the stadium deal — would require issuing $195 million in bonds, according to a proposed agreement released by negotiators for Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and the City Council.
OPINION
April 21, 2010 | Austin Beutner
On April 14, I had the privilege of attending a small roundtable discussion here in Los Angeles with German Chancellor Angela Merkel. After some remarks about a strong collaboration between our city and her country, Merkel got straight to the point: What is going on with the city's utility, and is Los Angeles on the brink of collapse? Those are crucial and highly interrelated questions. Our city's future and its economic recovery rest in part upon a Department of Water & Power that is innovative, cost-effective and second to none in serving the public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2003 | Olga R. Rodriguez, Times Staff Writer
Urban designers unveiled six plans that officials hope would transform San Pedro's decaying waterfront into a thriving shopping and entertainment district aimed at tourists. The plans presented this month would create a waterfront promenade stretching 7 1/2 miles from the Vincent Thomas Bridge to the corner of 5th Street and Harbor Boulevard.
NEWS
December 1, 2001 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the last eight years, the city of Los Angeles has forsaken more than $117 million in federal grants urgently needed to improve safety and security at Los Angeles International Airport. The federal money could have been used to soundproof hundreds of homes, to build safer taxiways to prevent near misses between aircraft and to install advanced security systems to keep intruders from reaching "secure" areas of passenger terminals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2001 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the end of former Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan's administration, the city government allowed millions of dollars in federal grants for poor neighborhoods to accumulate unspent, building up an account that violated federal guidelines and jeopardized the city's ability to secure future funding. Aides to Mayor James K. Hahn discovered the surplus when they took over in July. Since then, they have rushed to spend the money to avoid angering the federal government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2001 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Mayor James K. Hahn agreed Friday to negotiate a split of city parks, libraries, police stations and other assets for a ballot proposal on San Fernando Valley secession. But Hahn also suggested Los Angeles might insist that a new Valley city pay for any transferred assets. "The rest of the city helped provide all that infrastructure in the Valley when the Valley had very little tax revenue to support the infrastructure," Hahn said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1990 | RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing conflict-of-interest concerns, city officials said Monday that they have cut off funding to a poverty program formerly headed by Bishop H. H. Brookins and housed in an office complex he secretly owned and renovated with city funds. The action was taken following inquiries from The Times about the 10-year-old South Los Angeles Development Corp., which has received more than $500,000 in federal funds through the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1996 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles International Airport on Monday reimbursed the city's general fund $31 million in decades-old loans and investments--a move hailed by some as a windfall but derided by others who contend that it could end up jeopardizing federal funding for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2001 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his final three days in office, former Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan went on a $1.7-million spending spree, bestowing large chunks of money from his office account on pet projects such as libraries, the zoo and after-school programs. An examination of Riordan's expenditures by The Times also revealed that in his last month, he handed out a flurry of staff bonuses totaling more than $400,000, more than twice as much as the previous year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2001 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles officials agreed Tuesday to pay $3.75 million in an alleged police retaliation case after an outside review found that the city stood little chance of winning an appeal, in part because its attorneys made irreversible errors during trial.
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