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NEWS
June 20, 1985 | ALAN DROOZ, Times Staff Writer
The annual Los Angeles Games (formerly the Watts Summer Games) get under way this weekend in 13 sports at 16 sites around the Southland, with the biggest field ever in basketball and Banning High defending its title in non-contact football. Torrance High will be the focal point for much of the action, hosting football, baseball and girls basketball. Team competition will also be held in the 18th annual games in softball, boys and girls volleyball, soccer and water polo.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2012 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Jeff Blatnick, who overcame cancer to win a gold medal in Greco-Roman wrestling at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, died Wednesday. He was 55. Blatnick died of complications from heart surgery, USA Wrestling said on its website, citing a report from television station WNYT in Albany, N.Y. Officials at Ellis Hospital in Schenectady confirmed that he died there of heart failure. Blatnick was a high school state champion in suburban Albany in the mid-1970s and a two-time Division II national champion and three-time Division II All-American at Springfield College in Massachusetts.
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SPORTS
July 1, 1986 | TOM FARREY, Times Staff Writer
I n 1968, the Watts Games were formed to help dissolve the racial and ethnic problems that caused the riots three years earlier. The program says that it was the founders' belief that "understanding, fellowship, and mutual respect can be fostered through athletic competition." That's the honorable. This is the practical: Perhaps nowhere in America is there a better indicator of next season's top high school teams.
SPORTS
August 3, 2012 | By David Wharton
LONDON - Not much felt right to Reese Hoffa on a chilly evening at Olympic Stadium. The American shotputter could not find a rhythm. His technique was off. Only one thing made him believe he could pull things together - a long stretch of U.S. success in this event. "We continually get medals at the Olympic Games," he said. "I wanted to be part of that tradition. " Hoffa wasn't good enough to unseat defending gold medalist Tomasz Majewski of Poland, who became just the second man to repeat as champion.
SPORTS
January 10, 1985 | Associated Press
In what he said were his first public remarks about the Summer Olympics since he orchestrated the extravaganza, Peter Ueberroth Wednesday said the Games became a crusade for organizers when they realized they had the nation's reputation in their hands. Ueberroth, now the commissioner of baseball, addressed about 2,000 people at the annual meeting of the Greater Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1995 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A leading mover in the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics, attorney John C. Argue, was elected Monday as chairman of the board of the Amateur Athletic Foundation of Los Angeles, which disseminates funds from the Olympic surplus to Southern California youth sports programs. Over the past decade, the foundation has been an important funder of sports activities, contributing about $60 million in grants to outside groups and to its own programs.
SPORTS
July 16, 1995 | KEN PETERS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
After a sea of red ink in Montreal and a boycott that made the Games in Moscow virtually an East bloc affair, Los Angeles got the Olympics nobody else wanted--and turned them into a rousing success. The 1984 Summer Games revitalized the Olympic movement, established a fresh approach to the globe's biggest sports festival and, for two festive weeks that August, gave this city some of its finest moments.
NEWS
July 23, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON and DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Greats of Games past--Jesse Owens, Jean-Claude Killy, Wilma Rudolph--are celebrated in the Olympic Museum. But the central place of tribute is reserved for a wall bathed in spotlights in the foyer. There, five dozen heroes of another sort--NBC, Coca-Cola, Samsung among them--have paid $1 million apiece to have their names chiseled in granite and highlighted in gold leaf. Each stone on the wall of honor bears silent testimony to the singular influence that has made the Olympic movement what it is today: money.
SPORTS
July 28, 1994 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten years ago today, a spirit of joyous expectancy pervaded Los Angeles as the 1984 Olympic Games got under way. From the time the torch relay had arrived the week before, it was evident enthusiasm about the Games was high and that many of the fears so widely expressed during seven years of preparation were fading. The man in charge of that effort, Peter Ueberroth, said Wednesday that he felt, on balance, relaxed 10 years ago this morning. "Something could go wrong, but it was working," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1985
In your excellent coverage of the "Olympics '84, a Year Later" (July 28), one crucial and historic aspect of the behind-the-scenes battles went unreported. The Los Angeles Olympic Organizing Committee was the first integrated and truly representative group ever to play a significant role in Olympics affairs. This did not simply happen by chance. The Olympic movement had a long, ugly history of bigotry at the top levels. Mayor Tom Bradley was determined that old guard Olympic stalwarts would not control the Los Angeles Games.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Mark Whitehead, a member of the U.S. track cycling team that participated in blood doping during the 1984 Summer Olympics, creating a scandal that led to the practice being banned from the sport, has died. He was 50. Whitehead died in Frisco, Texas, while attending the USA Cycling Junior Track National Championships, USA Cycling announced Wednesday . The organization said no further details were available. His 20 national championships included the team pursuit in 1984, which contributed to his being chosen for the U.S. squad that competed in the Los Angeles Games, the cycling website VeloNews reported . Encouraged by their coach — and less than a week before the Olympics — Whitehead and seven other members of the U.S. cycling team took "advantage of the dubious practice called blood boosting," David Wallechinsky wrote in "The Complete Book of the Olympics.
SPORTS
August 4, 2009 | Lauren Goldman
The big news Track sensation Carl Lewis gave spectators in the Coliseum the show they had come to see. Establishing himself as the "World's Fastest Human," Lewis won gold in the 100-meter final. Not only did he win, but he ran the distance in 9.99 seconds, beating silver medalist Sam Graddy of the U.S. by eight feet, translating to 0.2 of a second. The margin of victory was an Olympic record, pushing aside Bob Hayes' 1964 victory in which he ran the distance in 10.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2009 | Cathleen Decker
Unheralded, a ribbon of aqua runs along the outside rim of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. Down the street, on the side of a neighborhood recreation center, rests a set of Olympic rings. Both are reminders of the city's last Olympics, the 1984 games, which got underway 25 years ago this past week.
SPORTS
February 23, 2007 | Helene Elliott
Picture the Mona Lisa wearing a leather jacket and miniskirt and clutching an iPod. It wouldn't work. Imposing a modern sensibility on a classic icon creates a culture clash that the brain simply can't process. The temporary steel-framed addition that would envelop the Coliseum if Los Angeles gets the 2016 Summer Olympics would have the same jarring effect.
SPORTS
July 22, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Swin Cash scored 18 points, Cheryl Ford added 13 points and 11 rebounds, and the Detroit Shock ended the Sparks' six-game winning streak with a 73-59 victory Friday night. The Shock (15-7) led by as many as 18 points in the first half and avenged an 86-78 loss at Los Angeles in June. The Sparks (19-6) were starting an eight-game trip. A crowd of 8,174 watched the first WNBA game played here at Van Andel Arena. Lisa Leslie, the All-Star center who entered the game averaging 20.
SPORTS
June 14, 2004 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
Peter Ueberroth, the entrepreneur who headed the 1984 Los Angeles Olympic Games, is expected to be named chairman of a newly reconstituted U.S. Olympic Committee board of directors, sources said Sunday. The USOC has scheduled a news conference for today at its Colorado Springs, Colo., headquarters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1996
Organizers of Atlanta's Olympic Games concede that some of the drivers they hired for their transport fleet had never sat behind the wheel of a bus before. It shows. And organizers, participants and fans of the 1984 Los Angeles Games can sympathize in a way. Here transit officials whipped would-be motorists into a frenzy of anxiety before they even set out in the morning. "Oh, you'll be able to get going," said one official, "but you'll never get home." Warnings like those helped keep L.A.
SPORTS
July 19, 1991 | ELLIOTT ALMOND
Peter Westbrook has rattled a few sabers in his day. The four-time fencing Olympian won a bronze medal in the 1984 Los Angeles Games, five gold medals in six Olympic Festivals, eight Pan American Games medals and a record 12 national championships. Westbrook, 39, hopes to make it five Olympic appearances, but that is it. "There's other things in life besides fencing," he said during the Festival, where he is hoping to add another gold medal to his collection this weekend.
SPORTS
October 28, 2001 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Intent on using existing facilities and staging a Games without government subsidies, officials with the failed Los Angeles 2012 Olympics bid say they still believe they had the right idea--even though the U.S. Olympic Committee clearly found the L.A. approach lacking.
SPORTS
June 7, 2001 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mixing civic pride with a dash of boosterism and the savvy gained from staging dozens of world-class events, the 16-page summary of the Los Angeles 2012 Bid Committee's application to host the Summer Olympics emphasizes the area's cultural, athletic and technological resources and organizers' know-how in an effort to persuade the U.S. Olympic Committee to select Los Angeles as a host for the third time.
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