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Los Angeles General Plan

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1995 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what may be its most important action in 20 years, the Los Angeles City Planning Commission on Thursday adopted a long-term blueprint that sets the tone for how the city will develop in the next century. In a unanimous vote and with little fanfare, the commission affirmed the growth principles laid out in the General Plan Framework--with their strong emphasis on public transportation and apartments above shops--and sent it on to the City Council for review and final action.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1995
Los Angeles is in the process of updating its city General Plan, which acts as a sort of long-term blueprint for growth. Now awaiting final passage, the plan envisions a Los Angeles 20 years in the future--a city much like the one that exists today, but home to 800,000 more people and supported by a public transit network. How Los Angeles manages its growth will affect the entire region.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1995 | AARON CURTISS
Dozens of people are expected to turn out today to criticize a long-term blueprint for growth in Los Angeles that will be presented to the city Planning Commission at City Hall. The General Plan Framework guides how the city will develop over the next two decades. It seeks to direct most new construction into "targeted growth areas," or high-density neighborhoods connected by transit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1995 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what may be its most important action in 20 years, the Los Angeles City Planning Commission on Thursday adopted a long-term blueprint that sets the tone for how the city will develop in the next century. In a unanimous vote and with little fanfare, the commission affirmed the growth principles laid out in the General Plan Framework--with their strong emphasis on public transportation and apartments above shops--and sent it on to the City Council for review and final action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1995 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Fernando Valley residents got their first formal look Wednesday at a new long-term growth plan intended to guide Los Angeles into the next century, but the half-dozen or so who showed up did not appear impressed. They milled casually about the Chatsworth High School auditorium, scrutinized colorful poster-sized maps, munched on grocery store cookies and cast skeptical sideways glances as planning officials carefully explained the intricacies of the proposed General Plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1994 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles of the future looks pretty good on paper: a bustling metropolis where streets are safe and full of life, where public transit whisks commuters swiftly and comfortably from place to place, where poor and rich alike have equal access to parks, schools and jobs. But putting dreams on paper is the easy part.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1993 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acknowledging that politics has the power both to inspire and to stifle vision, planners drawing the blueprint for a future Los Angeles this week briefed City Council members on how the city could look, feel and move in 20 years. The meeting between planners and five council members was among the first in a series of gatherings intended to get elected leaders involved in the two-year process of redrawing the city's General Plan--the document that guides growth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1995 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A long-term strategy to guide growth in Los Angeles was blasted Thursday as a "blueprint for disaster" that will destroy quiet neighborhoods, clog roads, drive away businesses and overwhelm sewers and other utilities. Dozens of Los Angeles residents from Woodland Hills to South-Central complained to the city Planning Commission that the General Plan Framework is not so much a careful plan to guide the city into the next century as it is a blank check to developers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1995
Every city in California is required by law to have a current General Plan. Los Angeles' plan was last updated in 1974, when the City Council adopted the "Centers Concept," which encouraged development in urban centers such as Century City or downtown. The plan now under review builds on that idea and refines it to correspond to long-range improvements to the regional bus and rail networks. Planners are taking their ideas on the road over the next month to solicit comments from the public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1995
For the first time in more than two decades, Los Angeles is redrawing its General Plan, the document that serves as the city's long-term blueprint for growth. General Plans are mandated by state law and help cities plan ahead for major infrastructure improvements such as road widenings and new sewer pipes. Plans are required to address a wide range of issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1995 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A long-term strategy to guide growth in Los Angeles was blasted Thursday as a "blueprint for disaster" that will destroy quiet neighborhoods, clog roads, drive away businesses and overwhelm sewers and other utilities. Dozens of Los Angeles residents from Woodland Hills to South-Central complained to the city Planning Commission that the General Plan Framework is not so much a careful plan to guide the city into the next century as it is a blank check to developers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1995 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A long-term strategy to guide growth in Los Angeles was blasted Thursday as a "blueprint for disaster" that will destroy quiet neighborhoods, clog roads, drive away businesses and overwhelm sewers and other utilities. Dozens of Los Angeles residents from Woodland Hills to South-Central complained to the City Planning Commission that the General Plan Framework is not so much a careful plan to guide the city into the next century as a blank check to developers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1995 | AARON CURTISS
Dozens of people are expected to turn out today to criticize a long-term blueprint for growth in Los Angeles that will be presented to the city Planning Commission at City Hall. The General Plan Framework guides how the city will develop over the next two decades. It seeks to direct most new construction into "targeted growth areas," or high-density neighborhoods connected by transit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1995 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles will face ever larger municipal financial problems over the next two decades unless thousands of jobs are created to keep pace with a steady increase in population, a panel of economists and urban planners concluded Thursday. Speaking to the Los Angeles City Planning Commission, the panel also agreed that city budgets could be in danger of running deficits of $125 million to $182 million a year if the city's industries continue moving to suburban cities and other states.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1995 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Fernando Valley residents got their first formal look Wednesday at a new long-term growth plan intended to guide Los Angeles into the next century, but the half-dozen or so who showed up did not appear impressed. They milled casually about the Chatsworth High School auditorium, scrutinized colorful poster-sized maps, munched on grocery store cookies and cast skeptical sideways glances as planning officials carefully explained the intricacies of the proposed General Plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1995
Every city in California is required by law to have a current General Plan. Los Angeles' plan was last updated in 1974, when the City Council adopted the "Centers Concept," which encouraged development in urban centers such as Century City or downtown. The plan now under review builds on that idea and refines it to correspond to long-range improvements to the regional bus and rail networks. Planners are taking their ideas on the road over the next month to solicit comments from the public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1995 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles will face ever larger municipal financial problems over the next two decades unless thousands of jobs are created to keep pace with a steady increase in population, a panel of economists and urban planners concluded Thursday. Speaking to the Los Angeles City Planning Commission, the panel also agreed that city budgets could be in danger of running deficits of $125 million to $182 million a year if the city's industries continue moving to suburban cities and other states.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1995
Los Angeles is in the process of updating its city General Plan, which acts as a sort of long-term blueprint for growth. Now awaiting final passage, the plan envisions a Los Angeles 20 years in the future--a city much like the one that exists today, but home to 800,000 more people and supported by a public transit network. How Los Angeles manages its growth will affect the entire region.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1995 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An ambitious plan to transform neighborhoods around rail and bus stops seeks to capitalize on the region's enormous investment in mass transit but would be expensive and may do little to rein in sprawl or reduce traffic congestion, planning experts said Thursday. The idea of developing bustling districts of apartments and shops around transit stops is a key component of the city's new General Plan, which serves as a long-term blueprint for growth in Los Angeles.
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