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Los Angeles General Services Department

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1988
Six finalists were named Friday in the competition to succeed Sylvia Cunliffe as head of the Los Angeles General Services Department. The six, chosen from a field of 53 candidates, include three city employees and three officials from government agencies in other cities. Personnel Director John J.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2000 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ask and ye shall receive. At least that's the way it works if you're a Los Angeles city councilman. Veteran lawmaker Nate Holden, for example, asked for a $45,223 super-deluxe sport utility vehicle at public expense--and he got it. The councilman, who won reelection to his final term last spring, decided he wanted to try the new Lincoln Navigator 2000, so he called the city's General Services Department and bingo--they found exactly the vehicle.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1997 | DARRELL SATZMAN
In a high-tech attempt to stir interest in surplus real estate, the Los Angeles General Services Department has created an Internet site offering detailed information about city properties to be sold at auction. The Web site, which came online this month, currently provides information on 12 properties--including a Sherman Oaks hillside lot--that are scheduled to be auctioned Oct. 20, said Jess Romo, a city real estate officer who helped develop the experimental program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1998 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A protracted dispute between city officials and a Sun Valley contractor has left at least 16 city streets without the required reflective striping that usually separates traffic lanes. City transportation crews now are racing to lay down the yellow or white lines on stretches of major thoroughfares such as Victory and Foothill boulevards. The stripes--made of molten plastic poured onto the pavement--are designed to reflect light.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1987 | VICTOR MERINA, Times Staff Writer
Sylvia Cunliffe, the head of Los Angeles' General Services Department, has been placed on 45-day paid leave by Mayor Tom Bradley, who fears that her effectiveness in running the city's fourth largest agency has been impaired by a "rash of allegations" against her conduct on the job. Bradley took Cunliffe off the job while investigators look into charges of mismanagement, favoritism and misuse of confidential personnel information to discredit a whistle-blower.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1987 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles General Services Department head Sylvia Cunliffe would remain on a paid leave of absence until her 55th birthday in March and then resign from city service under a proposal to be considered today by the City Council, The Times has learned. The proposal is essentially identical to one suggested last month by Councilman Hal Bernson during a stormy, closed-door session.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1987 | BILL BOYARSKY, Times City-County Bureau Chief
The Los Angeles General Services Department, criticized for its leasing practices, has revealed that the city loses about $1.5 million a year from the shopping mall next to City Hall, where the city leases space to shops, banks and restaurants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1987 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
Ending a rancorous controversy, in which mayoral politics and harassment of a whistle-blower became key ingredients, Sylvia Cunliffe agreed Wednesday to retire as general manager of Los Angeles' General Services Department. Cunliffe's retirement agreement followed a half-hour debate by the City Council, which then voted 8 to 4 in favor of a 10-point settlement hammered out between her attorneys and city negotiators. The arrangement spared Cunliffe from possibly being fired.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1987 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
Sylvia Cunliffe, embattled head of the Los Angeles General Services Department, used her agency's internal police force to gather confidential arrest records on a number of employees suspected of various crimes against the city, documents revealed Wednesday. Cunliffe's police, led by former Los Angeles Police Department homicide detective Carl Kundert, were trained at the Police Academy and, Kundert said recently, investigated "bank robbery, rape, drugs, theft of city property . . .
NEWS
December 26, 1995 | JAMES RAINEY and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Welcome to the city of Los Angeles General Services Department--the bureaucracy within the bureaucracy. Or, some critics would say, the hole in the middle of the too-fat doughnut. This is the agency where the former budget chief improperly claimed $95,000 in overtime. This is the agency with a "hellish" record of sometimes delivering goods to other city departments months late. This is the agency where employees preoccupied with paperwork often miss the best buys on equipment and supplies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1998 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A protracted dispute between Los Angeles city officials and a Sun Valley contractor has left at least 16 city streets without the required reflective striping that usually separates traffic lanes. City transportation crews are racing to lay down the yellow or white lines on stretches of heavily traveled thoroughfares, such as Victory and Foothill boulevards. The stripes--made of super-heated molten plastic poured onto the pavement--are designed to reflect light.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1997 | DARRELL SATZMAN
In a high-tech attempt to stir interest in surplus real estate, the Los Angeles General Services Department has created an Internet site offering detailed information about city properties to be sold at auction. The Web site, which came online this month, currently provides information on 12 properties--including a Sherman Oaks hillside lot--that are scheduled to be auctioned Oct. 20, said Jess Romo, a city real estate officer who helped develop the experimental program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1996 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan met with Randall C. Bacon for an hour to discuss his frequent absences from his job as head of the Department of General Services, and is considering instituting a new policy to track the sick leave of top city managers. Riordan left this week's meeting with Bacon satisfied that Bacon's 29 1/2 sick days in 1995 were for "legitimate medical issues" said Michael Keeley, chief operating officer in the mayor's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1996 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The high absentee rate of a top Los Angeles city official has gone unscrutinized by Mayor Richard Riordan, despite a city policy that requires mandatory accounting of time for all employees who frequently miss work. Randall C. Bacon, head of the city's General Services Department, reported that his sick days added up to nearly six weeks in 1995, nearly 2 1/2 times the total that is supposed to trigger an attendance review. Yet no review has been conducted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1996 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City officials are trying to fire the maintenance supervisor who failed to flag a troubled trash truck for repairs last month on the night before the truck malfunctioned, colliding with a school bus and killing two third-graders. Dave Wear, the veteran supervisor who has been on paid administrative leave since the fatal crash Dec.
NEWS
December 26, 1995 | JAMES RAINEY and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Welcome to the city of Los Angeles General Services Department--the bureaucracy within the bureaucracy. Or, some critics would say, the hole in the middle of the too-fat doughnut. This is the agency where the former budget chief improperly claimed $95,000 in overtime. This is the agency with a "hellish" record of sometimes delivering goods to other city departments months late. This is the agency where employees preoccupied with paperwork often miss the best buys on equipment and supplies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1988 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Tom Bradley hired the highest-ranked black official in San Diego County and a prominent Los Angeles arts figure for top city jobs Wednesday, filling vacancies left when two of his most controversial appointees departed City Hall in a hurry. In also elevating veteran Los Angeles city officials to three other top jobs, Bradley rejected pleas from Latino leaders for at least two appointments and a bigger share of the plum jobs in city government.
NEWS
December 8, 1995 | JODI WILGOREN and JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One day after a malfunctioning city garbage truck killed two 8-year-old boys, Los Angeles city officials made several instant policy changes Thursday to improve safety--requiring mechanical problems to be posted directly on vehicle dashboards, expanding drivers' morning inspections and prohibiting operators from compacting trash while trucks are traveling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1995
Two weeks after an accident between a city trash truck and a school bus that killed two 8-year-old boys, Mayor Richard Riordan on Wednesday called for a trio of reviews of the city's sanitation operation, and Councilman Richard Alarcon blasted city staffers for delaying a report on whether garbage truck mechanics should be moved from one department to another.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1995 | JODI WILGOREN and LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As trash collection was delayed in many parts of the city for another day Monday, city officials suggested that an overhaul of the system for repairing the city's fleet of garbage trucks may be necessary to prevent malfunctions like the one that led to the deaths of two 8-year-old boys on a school bus last week.
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