Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLos Angeles Glendale Sewage Treatment Plant
IN THE NEWS

Los Angeles Glendale Sewage Treatment Plant

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1991
Four of Los Angeles' largest irrigation water users signed formal agreements with the city Thursday to use as much as 525 million gallons of reclaimed water annually. Representatives from Forest Lawn Memorial-Park Assn., Mt. Sinai Memorial-Park, Lakeside Golf Club of Hollywood and MCA Inc. signed agreements that represent the city's first major marketing effort for reclaimed water.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1991
Four of Los Angeles' largest irrigation water users signed formal agreements with the city Thursday to use as much as 525 million gallons of reclaimed water annually. Representatives from Forest Lawn Memorial-Park Assn., Mt. Sinai Memorial-Park, Lakeside Golf Club of Hollywood and MCA Inc. signed agreements that represent the city's first major marketing effort for reclaimed water.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1988 | GREG BRAXTON, Times Staff Writer
At least 60,000 gallons of crude oil from a ruptured underground line oozed into a busy Encino neighborhood and the Los Angeles River for four hours Saturday, forcing the closure of a half-mile stretch of Ventura Boulevard, the busiest thoroughfare in the San Fernando Valley, and angering merchants and motorists. Crews were expected to work all night to repair the leak in a Mobil Oil Co. underground line at Ventura Boulevard and Woodley Avenue.
NEWS
August 24, 1989 | SANTIAGO O'DONNELL, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power is planning to more than double the capacity of the Glendale-Los Angeles sewage treatment plant. The expansion plan, unveiled last week at a sparsely attended public meeting in southern Glendale, is part of a broad strategy by the city of Los Angeles to increase sewage treatment capacity throughout its service area.
NEWS
May 26, 1988 | DOUG SMITH
At the south end of Chevy Chase Drive, past the railroad tracks, a few homes and graffiti-splattered walls, the La Azteca Tortilleria and the abandoned plant of the Diamond H Fence Co., stands a guard gate. Beyond that is a small complex of city offices. Outside, a mildly cryptic sign in the parking lot reads: "The 20th Hole." In golf, of course, the "19th Hole" is the country club, where golfers retire for post-game drinks and repartee after completing the real 18 holes.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|