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Los Angeles Government Employees Wages And Salaries

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1987 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Finding that paramedics in some areas of Los Angeles are too fatigued to do their jobs effectively, a city-appointed arbitrator has recommended a 36-hour limit on the number of consecutive hours a paramedic can be forced to work.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Mayor James K. Hahn on Monday signed a council ordinance to provide full compensation to city employees called to active military duty following the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Under the ordinance, the city will pay the difference between the employees' military salary and their regular city salary, including benefits.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1992 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One Los Angeles firefighter logged so much overtime this year--more than doubling his $55,000 annual salary--that a superior speculated that he was "almost literally never home." At least five harbor police officers were on the clock so often that they made more than the chief of the 51-officer department. And dozens of refuse collectors pulled down up to $26,000 apiece in overtime, in large part because the city's new automated garbage trucks kept breaking down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2001 | STEVE LOPEZ
When I heard they were giving away money at City Hall this week, I threw an application together and dashed over there as soon as I could. If you missed Tina Daunt's stories in The Times, Los Angeles City Councilman Nate Holden put two former colleagues on the public dole to tide them over until they find real jobs. It was Christmas in July for ex-Councilmen Mike Hernandez and Rudy Svorinich Jr. They were signed up at $950 a week for consulting work, retroactive to July 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1991 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City Controller Rick Tuttle on Thursday blasted the Department of Water and Power for sloppy accounting and deliberately ignoring his rulings on expenses. In a report released Thursday, Tuttle listed of 11 findings in which his auditors detailed misuse of travel and expense accounts. Deputy Controller Tim Lynch described the team's findings as "unusual and not routine." "There are serious problems of internal controls," Lynch said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2001 | STEVE LOPEZ
When I heard they were giving away money at City Hall this week, I threw an application together and dashed over there as soon as I could. If you missed Tina Daunt's stories in The Times, Los Angeles City Councilman Nate Holden put two former colleagues on the public dole to tide them over until they find real jobs. It was Christmas in July for ex-Councilmen Mike Hernandez and Rudy Svorinich Jr. They were signed up at $950 a week for consulting work, retroactive to July 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Mayor James K. Hahn on Monday signed a council ordinance to provide full compensation to city employees called to active military duty following the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Under the ordinance, the city will pay the difference between the employees' military salary and their regular city salary, including benefits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2000
The Los Angeles Unified School District and the union representing about 1,500 skilled crafts workers have agreed on a tentative 2-year contract providing for a nearly 14% pay and benefit increase, district officials said. The agreement would give members of the Los Angeles/Orange Counties Building and Construction Trades Council a 6% raise retroactive to July 1 and add to the permanent salary schedule a 2% bonus paid last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2000
The city's overtime expenses have steadily increased by 15%--or $18 million--over the last four years, according to an audit released Friday by City Controller Rick Tuttle. Tuttle and his staff found that 23,784 city employees received some cash overtime in 1996, compared with 25,088 employees in 1999, for an average payment of $5,404. "Unfortunately, our review found some situations that look like management was asleep at the switch when it came to controlling overtime," Tuttle wrote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1996 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday moved to give the city's top bureaucrats an expanded package of perks, but balked at a proposal by Mayor Richard Riordan to boost the salaries of eight high-ranking officials. Responding to concerns that it can be difficult to recruit from the outside, the council voted 12-1 to increase paid vacation for general managers and assistant general managers from two weeks to three or four weeks, depending on their level of experience.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2000
The Los Angeles Unified School District and the union representing about 1,500 skilled crafts workers have agreed on a tentative 2-year contract providing for a nearly 14% pay and benefit increase, district officials said. The agreement would give members of the Los Angeles/Orange Counties Building and Construction Trades Council a 6% raise retroactive to July 1 and add to the permanent salary schedule a 2% bonus paid last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2000
The city's overtime expenses have steadily increased by 15%--or $18 million--over the last four years, according to an audit released Friday by City Controller Rick Tuttle. Tuttle and his staff found that 23,784 city employees received some cash overtime in 1996, compared with 25,088 employees in 1999, for an average payment of $5,404. "Unfortunately, our review found some situations that look like management was asleep at the switch when it came to controlling overtime," Tuttle wrote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2000
City Councilwoman Jackie Goldberg on Friday called on her colleagues to require that private firms with city ties boost the pay and benefits of their bottom-rung service employees from $8.76 an hour to $10 an hour. "The current struggle by janitors throughout the city is evidence that the gap between rich and poor continues to grow in the city," Goldberg said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1999 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After spending more than $17 million on a long-anticipated overhaul of Los Angeles' computerized payroll system, the city controller has decided to scrap it. In a letter sent to Mayor Richard Riordan on Friday, Controller Rick Tuttle essentially recommends that the current, nearly 30-year-old computer system continue to handle the job of issuing paychecks to the city's 32,000 workers. With the project a year behind schedule and millions over budget, Tuttle said the city should cut its losses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City Council members expressed concern Monday that the cost of installing the city's new computerized payroll system has escalated from $13 million to $24 million as the project has fallen a year behind schedule. Members of the council's Budget and Finance Committee called Monday for a shake-up of the team managing the Los Angeles payroll system.
NEWS
February 7, 1999 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Let the academics, politicians and labor leaders debate the definition of a living wage. For airport janitor Jose Morales, it means two concrete things--a bed and a car. Two years ago, Morales was sleeping on flattened cardboard boxes in a Compton garage. Every morning before dawn, he stumbled to the corner bus stop for the start of a two-hour commute to his job at Los Angeles International Airport. Twice on that corner he was mugged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1996
The Los Angeles City Council approved a first step Wednesday in supplementing the pay of city employees called into active military duty in Bosnia. The unanimous vote instructs the city attorney to draw up an ordinance that will allow the city to make up the difference between employee salaries and military pay for a period of up to 180 days. Similar subsidies were approved in 1991 for reservists employed by the city who were called to duty in the Persian Gulf War.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1996 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten of Los Angeles' highest-paid city employees will probably receive raises of 4% to 21%, even though their performance reviews are mired in bureaucratic delays. The raises range from $4,614 to $19,210 and would make Bill McCarley, a former mayoral chief of staff who now heads the Department of Water and Power, the top earner on the city payroll, collecting $190,000 a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1999 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first private attempt to enforce Los Angeles' living wage ordinance, janitors sued their city contractor-employer Wednesday for allegedly failing to pay them the legal wage. The city's living wage law requires that workers for private contractors, doing jobs that would ordinarily be done by city workers, receive at least $7.39 per hour with benefits or $8.64 per hour without benefits. California's general minimum wage is $5.75 per hour.
NEWS
December 2, 1998 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After vetoing the city's first "living wage" law, Mayor Richard Riordan now has decided to allow an expansion of it to go into effect, a move the measure's champions say will increase pressure on the airlines at Los Angeles International Airport to grant raises to their security workers and others. Critics, however, say the real effect of Riordan's move will be to accelerate a legal showdown between the city and the air carriers.
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