Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLos Angeles Government Employees Women
IN THE NEWS

Los Angeles Government Employees Women

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1995
One day after Los Angeles City Councilwoman Laura Chick accused some of her male colleagues of perpetuating a sexist environment, female workers at City Hall on Friday praised her for "breaking the code of silence." Anne Dunn, assistant executive director of the city's Commission on the Status of Women, said she expects that having a high-ranking city official such as Chick speak out on sexism will make other female workers more comfortable in discussing the problem.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1995
One day after Los Angeles City Councilwoman Laura Chick accused some of her male colleagues of perpetuating a sexist environment, female workers at City Hall on Friday praised her for "breaking the code of silence." Anne Dunn, assistant executive director of the city's Commission on the Status of Women, said she expects that having a high-ranking city official such as Chick speak out on sexism will make other female workers more comfortable in discussing the problem.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 23, 1992 | ALICIA DI RADO and LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Nearly two of every five women responding to a survey of Los Angeles city government's female work force say they were subjected to sexual harassment in their jobs last year, the Commission on the Status of Women reported Tuesday. The 37% of women who said they were harassed contrasts with the 25% to 30% typically found in nationwide surveys of women in the general workplace, experts say. Of the city's 11,722 women employees, 4,887, or about 42%, responded to the survey.
NEWS
September 23, 1992 | ALICIA DI RADO and LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Nearly two of every five women responding to a survey of Los Angeles city government's female work force say they were subjected to sexual harassment in their jobs last year, the Commission on the Status of Women reported Tuesday. The 37% of women who said they were harassed contrasts with the 25% to 30% typically found in nationwide surveys of women in the general workplace, experts say. Of the city's 11,722 women employees, 4,887, or about 42%, responded to the survey.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|