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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2000 | By PATRICK McGREEVY,
Cost overruns on the renovation of Los Angeles City Hall can be blamed partly on delays by a blue-ribbon committee appointed by Mayor Richard Riordan to reduce expenses on the project, a top city official said Wednesday. Chief Legislative Analyst Ron Deaton made the charge as the City Council reluctantly agreed to increase the City Hall seismic retrofit budget by $26 million to $299 million--nearly twice what the project originally was proposed to cost.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2000 | By PATRICK McGREEVY,
Cost overruns on the renovation of Los Angeles City Hall can be blamed partly on delays by a blue-ribbon committee appointed by Mayor Richard Riordan to reduce expenses on the project, a top city official said Wednesday. Chief Legislative Analyst Ron Deaton made the charge as the City Council reluctantly agreed to increase the City Hall seismic retrofit budget by $26 million to $299 million--nearly twice what the project originally was proposed to cost.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1999
Still stinging from the embarrassment of paying $800,000 in late fees on phone bills, the Los Angeles City Council voted Friday to approve $6.3 million and a package of reforms to make sure bills are paid on time for the rest of the year. "It's inexcusable," Councilman Joel Wachs said of the late fees. "Nobody was on top of this."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2000
To meet rising costs, a City Council panel on Friday authorized an extra $26 million for the renovation of Los Angeles City Hall, a project now expected to cost $299 million. The panel also approved a far smaller amount--$175,000--to replace the elevator at Van Nuys City Hall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"How many city employees does it take to change a light bulb? Thirty. One to screw it in and 29 to purchase it." --April 1995 ballot argument in favor of Charter Amendment 1, a purchasing reform measure. * Four years after passage of a referendum that promised to reform the cumbersome Los Angeles purchasing system and save city taxpayers $35 million a year, savings have fallen far short. The city spends $800 million annually buying goods and services, and will cut costs by only $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years after passage of a referendum that promised to reform the cumbersome Los Angeles purchasing system and save city taxpayers $35 million a year, savings have fallen far short. The city spends $800 million annually buying goods and services, and will cut costs by only $1.8 million this year as a result of the ballot measure. The purchasing reforms are part of a larger program to overhaul the way the city does business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1998 | PHIL WILLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County Supervisor Mike Antonovich called on the county and city of Los Angeles on Wednesday to pay for the estimated $1-million study on the feasibility of a San Fernando Valley secession from Los Angeles. Valley activists are on the verge of collecting the 135,000 petition signatures needed to prompt the Valley cityhood study by the Local Agency Formation Commission, the state authority that controls municipal expansion in Los Angeles County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1998 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid renewed calls for a formal limit on civic borrowing, a new city report released Tuesday shows that Los Angeles' debt could reach 12% of general fund revenues, potentially threatening the city's favorable bond ratings. But the report, by Chief Administrative Officer Keith Comrie, cautioned that the major bond rating agencies have indicated that the city's debt "will not, in and of itself" result in a lowering of the bond rating, but it will be considered, among other economic factors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1998 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles' share of the $206-billion national tobacco settlement will total $312 million over the next 25 years and, at City Hall, where there's smoke there's bound to be the fire of political contention. Mayor Richard Riordan wants to use the windfall to repair city sidewalks, which could get more use when the aggregate civic lung capacity increases as smoking declines. Others, such as City Atty. James K.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1998
Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan announced Wednesday that the city will receive $7.5 million in federal grants to pay for equipment and new programs for police officers and firefighters. The announcement was made days after the city snagged a much larger federal grant totaling about $150 million, enough to hire as many as 710 new police officers. The grants represent the most recent in a series of federal grant awards that have bolstered the city's public safety departments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"How many city employees does it take to change a light bulb? Thirty. One to screw it in and 29 to purchase it." --April 1995 ballot argument in favor of Charter Amendment 1, a purchasing reform measure. * Four years after passage of a referendum that promised to reform the cumbersome Los Angeles purchasing system and save city taxpayers $35 million a year, savings have fallen far short. The city spends $800 million annually buying goods and services, and will cut costs by only $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years after passage of a referendum that promised to reform the cumbersome Los Angeles purchasing system and save city taxpayers $35 million a year, savings have fallen far short. The city spends $800 million annually buying goods and services, and will cut costs by only $1.8 million this year as a result of the ballot measure. The purchasing reforms are part of a larger program to overhaul the way the city does business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1999
Still stinging from the embarrassment of paying $800,000 in late fees on phone bills, the Los Angeles City Council voted Friday to approve $6.3 million and a package of reforms to make sure bills are paid on time for the rest of the year. "It's inexcusable," Councilman Joel Wachs said of the late fees. "Nobody was on top of this."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1998 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles' share of the $206-billion national tobacco settlement will total $312 million over the next 25 years and, at City Hall, where there's smoke there's bound to be the fire of political contention. Mayor Richard Riordan wants to use the windfall to repair city sidewalks, which could get more use when the aggregate civic lung capacity increases as smoking declines. Others, such as City Atty. James K.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1998
Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan announced Wednesday that the city will receive $7.5 million in federal grants to pay for equipment and new programs for police officers and firefighters. The announcement was made days after the city snagged a much larger federal grant totaling about $150 million, enough to hire as many as 710 new police officers. The grants represent the most recent in a series of federal grant awards that have bolstered the city's public safety departments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1998 | PHIL WILLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County Supervisor Mike Antonovich called on the county and city of Los Angeles on Wednesday to pay for the estimated $1-million study on the feasibility of a San Fernando Valley secession from Los Angeles. Valley activists are on the verge of collecting the 135,000 petition signatures needed to prompt the Valley cityhood study by the Local Agency Formation Commission, the state authority that controls municipal expansion in Los Angeles County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2000
To meet rising costs, a City Council panel on Friday authorized an extra $26 million for the renovation of Los Angeles City Hall, a project now expected to cost $299 million. The panel also approved a far smaller amount--$175,000--to replace the elevator at Van Nuys City Hall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1998 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid renewed calls for a formal limit on civic borrowing, a new city report released Tuesday shows that Los Angeles' debt could reach 12% of general fund revenues, potentially threatening the city's favorable bond ratings. But the report, by Chief Administrative Officer Keith Comrie, cautioned that the major bond rating agencies have indicated that the city's debt "will not, in and of itself" result in a lowering of the bond rating, but it will be considered, among other economic factors.
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