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Los Angeles Government Officials Wages And Salaries

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles City Council members, who are already the highest paid in the nation, were notified Friday that they have received a 4% raise retroactive to July 1, 1999. The raise is on top of a 2.5% pay increase that council members received July 1--bumping their annual salaries 6.5% to a stellar level of $117,900, and drawing loud protests from taxpayer and homeowner groups.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2001 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an embarrassing about-face, Mayor Richard Riordan was forced Wednesday to rescind a recent merit raise he gave to Police Chief Bernard C. Parks after Riordan's staff discovered that, under the new City Charter, only the Police Commission has the authority to boost the chief's pay. "After reviewing . . .
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1989 | Times researcher Cecilia Rasmussen
In 1987, there were 43 appointed officials in the county of Los Angeles with salaries of more than $100,000. Today, more than 175 department heads and assistants top that salary. Of the 43 in 1987, none were women. Among the 175 names listed here, 11 are women. All references to "city" mean Los Angeles unless otherwise noted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2001 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exercising the new powers awarded to him by charter reform, Mayor Richard Riordan has handed out handsome raises over the last month to many of his department heads, according to figures released Monday. Police Chief Bernard C. Parks became the highest-paid official in the city when the mayor boosted his annual salary to $257,116. Even before the raise, Parks earned tens of thousands of more than the police chiefs in New York, Chicago and Philadelphia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2001 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exercising the new powers awarded to him by charter reform, Mayor Richard Riordan has handed out handsome raises over the last month to many of his department heads, according to figures released Monday. Police Chief Bernard C. Parks became the highest-paid official in the city when the mayor boosted his annual salary to $257,116. Even before the raise, Parks earned tens of thousands of more than the police chiefs in New York, Chicago and Philadelphia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles City Council members, already the highest paid in the nation, were notified Friday that they have received a 4% pay raise retroactive to July 1, 1999. The raise is on top of a 2.5% pay increase City Council members received July 1--bumping their annual salaries 6.5% to $117,900 and drawing loud protests from taxpayer and homeowner groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1996 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten of Los Angeles' highest-paid city employees will probably receive raises of 4% to 21%, even though their performance reviews are mired in bureaucratic delays. The raises range from $4,614 to $19,210 and would make Bill McCarley, a former mayoral chief of staff who now heads the Department of Water and Power, the top earner on the city payroll, collecting $190,000 a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1995
The city Ethics Commission will decide in a few days whether it sees potential conflict-of-interest problems with an unusual arrangement designed to pay Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan's chief of staff mainly with private funds. The mayor's office has asked for the city commission's opinion on the arrangement, which the state Fair Political Practices Commission has already determined to be lawful.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1995
The City Ethics Commission has no objections to an unusual arrangement in which private funds will be used to pay most of the salary of Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan's chief of staff. Noting that the state Fair Political Practices Commission has already approved the payment plan, Ethics Commission Director Benjamin Bycel recommended in a letter made public Monday that "to forestall any perceived conflict of interest problems," neither Riordan nor his chief of staff, William G.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1995
To most cash-strapped workers, an automatic 8% pay raise would be cause for celebration--maybe even a reason to take the day off and go on a shopping spree. Not so for elected officials in the city of Los Angeles who were awarded such a raise Jan. 1, six months before many of them face reelection and three months before having to balance a city budget as much as $200 million in the red.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2001 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles pays most of its top executives far more than any other major city in the United States, exceeding even such expensive areas as New York and San Francisco, according to a new internal city report. When shared with observers inside and outside the government, the report drew starkly different reactions: City leaders responsible for the salaries defended them, saying money is needed to attract talent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By signing a new state budget, Gov. Gray Davis also indirectly boosted pay by 12.5% for the Los Angeles City Council and county Board of Supervisors, raising their salaries to $133,051 by Jan. 1. The latest raises come less than a year after two other salary adjustments increased council pay by 6.5%. The state budget raises pay 12.5% for Superior Court judges. City Council and county supervisor salaries, funded from local budgets, are tied to the pay of judges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By signing a new state budget, Gov. Gray Davis also indirectly boosted pay by 12.5% for the Los Angeles City Council and County Board of Supervisors, bringing their salaries by Jan. 1 to $133,051. The latest raises come less than a year after two other salary increases boosted council pay by 6.5%. The new state budget raises pay 12.5% for Superior Court judges. Salaries of City Council members and county supervisors, funded from local budgets, are tied to the pay of judges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2000 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
A year of reform and reorganization at the Los Angeles Unified School District is significantly raising the salaries of top executives as well as increasing the number of people who can earn in the six-figure range, a Times analysis has found. At the same time, a gradual mushrooming of jobs in the 11 new subdistricts has apparently wiped out initial projections that the reorganization would trim hundreds of jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles City Council members, already the highest paid in the nation, were notified Friday that they have received a 4% pay raise retroactive to July 1, 1999. The raise is on top of a 2.5% pay increase City Council members received July 1--bumping their annual salaries 6.5% to $117,900 and drawing loud protests from taxpayer and homeowner groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles City Council members, who are already the highest paid in the nation, were notified Friday that they have received a 4% raise retroactive to July 1, 1999. The raise is on top of a 2.5% pay increase that council members received July 1--bumping their annual salaries 6.5% to a stellar level of $117,900, and drawing loud protests from taxpayer and homeowner groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1995 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To most workers, an automatic 8% pay raise would be cause for celebration, maybe even a reason to take the day off and go on a shopping spree. Not so for elected officials in the city of Los Angeles who were awarded such a raise Jan. 1--six months before many of them face reelection and three months before they face the task of balancing a city budget as much as $200 million in the red.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1994
A 5% pay increase that took effect Jan. 1 proved to be a litmus test for elected city officials committed to solving the city's budgetary problems. Many felt it would be a political embarrassment to accept the raise in the current budget crisis. In November, the City Council voted to recommend that all elected officials, including themselves, refuse the raise, but left it up to individuals to decide how the money should be spent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1999 | PATRICK MCGREEVY and MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Los Angeles City Council members were under fire this week over another round of pay raises--one that will hike their annual salaries to $113,376. A voter-approved ethics measure automatically triggered a 2.5% pay raise for Los Angeles City Council members effective July 1. That means their salaries have climbed 85% since Proposition H was approved in 1990, when council members earned $61,222.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1998 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles City Council members who received a temporary 12.5% raise July 1 will be able to keep the higher salary for at least another year as a coincidental byproduct of an action by the state Legislature, officials said Friday. The city charter ties council salaries to the pay of Municipal Court judges. In June, the Legislature gave the judges a raise from about $97,000 to $110,000 annually.
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