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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1999 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Riordan administration has grossly overstated its accomplishments in creating and retaining jobs in Los Angeles, according to an outside review of its work. The administration's business team, begun by Riordan as an arm of the mayor's office designed to attract, retain and help expand businesses in the city, has told the City Council and the news media that it has had an impact on businesses that represents about 315,000 jobs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Margaret Guyer didn't need to read the latest 380-page study of city services in the San Fernando Valley to know what it found--that her Sylmar neighborhood and the rest of the Valley's residents are not getting services to match the taxes they pay. Guyer has firsthand experience in trying unsuccessfully to get the city to pick up stray dogs, remove abandoned cars and fix cracked sidewalks to confirm what page after page of the financial report found.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Margaret Guyer didn't need to read the latest 380-page study of city services in the San Fernando Valley to know what it found--that her Sylmar neighborhood and the rest of the Valley's residents are not getting services to match the taxes they pay. Guyer has firsthand experience in trying unsuccessfully to get the city to pick up stray dogs, remove abandoned cars and fix cracked sidewalks to confirm what page after page of the financial report found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY and HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Alarmed that city enforcement of anti-slum codes for apartments has fallen years behind schedule, the Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday ordered a reform of the program to get it back on track. Two years ago, city officials promised that every one of the city's 750,000 apartments would be inspected once every three years, but only a quarter of the units have been inspected to date and officials say it may take six years or more to visit them all at the current rate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warning that Los Angeles is ill-prepared for a doubling of senior citizens during the next 20 years, a task force recommended Monday that the city expand housing, transportation and other services for its oldest residents. The task force, created by the Los Angeles City Council, found that "senior services remain underfunded, fragmented and out of step with rapid changes in the elder population." It recommended that the city develop a master plan to expand and link programs for the elderly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY and HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Alarmed that city enforcement of anti-slum codes for apartments has fallen years behind schedule, the Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday ordered a reform of the program to get it back on track. Two years ago, city officials promised that every one of the city's 750,000 apartments would be inspected once every three years, but only a quarter of the units have been inspected to date and officials say it may take six years or more to visit them all at the current rate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1998 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to draw companies to stubbornly depressed industrial districts, the Los Angeles City Council adopted a new set of businesses tax incentives Tuesday that had been advocated by Mayor Richard Riordan to promote job growth. The measure gives new businesses that locate in the city's so-called empowerment zone a five-year exemption from paying taxes on their gross receipts. In a rare moment of cooperation between Riordan and the council, it passed by a 12-2 vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1998 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to draw companies to stubbornly depressed industrial districts, the Los Angeles City Council adopted a new set of business tax incentives Tuesday that had been pushed by Mayor Richard Riordan to promote job growth. The measure spares new businesses in the city's so-called "empowerment zone" from the gross-receipts tax for five years.
NEWS
June 5, 2000 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For decades Los Angeles' downtown jewelry district has been as closed as an oyster shell clamped around a pearl. Security is so strict at some shops that workers are issued metal-free clothing and the shoes of departing visitors are X-rayed. Million-dollar deals are still sealed on a handshake by Old World entrepreneurs who shun written contracts and fax machines. And employees are culled from the trusted ranks of family or by word-of-mouth alone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warning that Los Angeles is ill-prepared for a doubling of the senior citizen population during the next 20 years, a task force recommended Monday that the city expand housing, transportation and other services provided to its oldest residents.
NEWS
June 5, 2000 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For decades Los Angeles' downtown jewelry district has been as closed as an oyster shell clamped around a pearl. Security is so strict at some shops that workers are issued metal-free clothing and the shoes of departing visitors are X-rayed. Million-dollar deals are still sealed on a handshake by Old World entrepreneurs who shun written contracts and fax machines. And employees are culled from the trusted ranks of family or by word-of-mouth alone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warning that Los Angeles is ill-prepared for a doubling of senior citizens during the next 20 years, a task force recommended Monday that the city expand housing, transportation and other services for its oldest residents. The task force, created by the Los Angeles City Council, found that "senior services remain underfunded, fragmented and out of step with rapid changes in the elder population." It recommended that the city develop a master plan to expand and link programs for the elderly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warning that Los Angeles is ill-prepared for a doubling of the senior citizen population during the next 20 years, a task force recommended Monday that the city expand housing, transportation and other services provided to its oldest residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1999 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Riordan administration has grossly overstated its accomplishments in creating and retaining jobs in Los Angeles, according to an outside review of its work. The administration's business team, begun by Riordan as an arm of the mayor's office designed to attract, retain and help expand businesses in the city, has told the City Council and the news media that it has had an impact on businesses that represents about 315,000 jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1998 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to draw companies to stubbornly depressed industrial districts, the Los Angeles City Council adopted a new set of businesses tax incentives Tuesday that had been advocated by Mayor Richard Riordan to promote job growth. The measure gives new businesses that locate in the city's so-called empowerment zone a five-year exemption from paying taxes on their gross receipts. In a rare moment of cooperation between Riordan and the council, it passed by a 12-2 vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1998 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to draw companies to stubbornly depressed industrial districts, the Los Angeles City Council adopted a new set of business tax incentives Tuesday that had been pushed by Mayor Richard Riordan to promote job growth. The measure spares new businesses in the city's so-called "empowerment zone" from the gross-receipts tax for five years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1994 | CHARLES PROCTOR, Principal, Normandie Avenue Elementary School
There are approximately 1,200 students, pre-kindergarten to fifth grade, in our school. We have a high turnover rate, so the number varies from day to day. Few days pass that we don't have a parent either checking a child out or registering a child in one of our classes. Our school is about 50% Latino and 50% African American. Unlike some schools, however, our parents seem to work very well together, without any friction between the racial groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1994 | CHARLES PROCTOR, Principal, Normandie Avenue Elementary School
There are approximately 1,200 students, pre-kindergarten to fifth grade, in our school. We have a high turnover rate, so the number varies from day to day. Few days pass that we don't have a parent either checking a child out or registering a child in one of our classes. Our school is about 50% Latino and 50% African American. Unlike some schools, however, our parents seem to work very well together, without any friction between the racial groups.
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