Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLos Angeles Herald Examiner Newspaper
IN THE NEWS

Los Angeles Herald Examiner Newspaper

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | JUDY PASTERNAK and THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles Herald Examiner, strapped with declining circulation and shrinking revenues, announced Wednesday that it will cease publication as of today, closing out a 118-year history that provided Los Angeles with some of its richest journalistic lore. Robert J. Danzig, Hearst vice president and general manager of the company's newspapers, stood on a desk Wednesday in the Herald's newsroom and broke the news in a brief statement to the assembled staff.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
May 1, 1990 | TOM ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Times has surpassed the New York Daily News to become the largest metropolitan daily newspaper in America in weekday circulation, according to preliminary figures released Monday by the Audit Bureau of Circulations. The numbers also offer some of the first insight available into what happened to the readers of the Los Angeles Herald Examiner after it closed last November. At the time of its demise, the Herald Examiner reported a circulation of roughly 230,000.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
July 29, 1989
The Dodgers believe in nonviolence. They won't hit anything. GEORGE W. FEINSTEIN Altadena
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once it was the newspaper for the city's working class, a key piece of Hearst's sensational empire. In the end, however, Hearst Corp. was willing to give the Los Angeles Herald Examiner away, as long as a buyer had the financial backing and commitment to seriously attempt a turnaround. At least one group made an offer in recent weeks, although it wanted Hearst to continue to share in the losses.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1990 | TOM ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Times has surpassed the New York Daily News to become the largest metropolitan daily newspaper in America in weekday circulation, according to preliminary figures released Monday by the Audit Bureau of Circulations. The numbers also offer some of the first insight available into what happened to the readers of the Los Angeles Herald Examiner after it closed last November. At the time of its demise, the Herald Examiner reported a circulation of roughly 230,000.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once it was the newspaper for the city's working class, a key piece of Hearst's sensational empire. In the end, however, Hearst Corp. was willing to give the Los Angeles Herald Examiner away, as long as a buyer had the financial backing and commitment to seriously attempt a turnaround. At least one group made an offer in recent weeks, although it wanted Hearst to continue to share in the losses.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Researcher
William Randolph Hearst founded the Los Angeles Examiner in 1903, in order to assist his campaign for the presidential nomination on the Democratic ticket and to complement his San Francisco Examiner. Over the years a series of changes involving two other Los Angeles dailies--including two mergers--took place, culminating with the creation of the Hearst chain's Los AngelesHerald Examiner in January, 1962.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They record all variety of events unfolding in every sort of place, but inevitably newspapers leave behind their own stories too. Beneath the smudges of ink and through the yellowing pages, newspapers make their own history. And when a newspaper passes, journalists grieve. The community--their community--is unalterably changed. And in their minds, reduced. Something romantic is lost. The civic pulse grows weaker.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE and PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writers
The owner of the Toronto Sun, a saucy Canadian tabloid heavy on pictures and crime stories, confirmed Thursday that it is exploring the purchase of the Los Angeles Herald Examiner. Toronto Sun Publishing Corp. stressed that its discussions with Hearst Corp., the media giant that owns the Herald, were exploratory. "There are no ongoing discussions," said John Rowsone, executive assistant to President J. Douglas Creighton. "At this point, it is all quite premature."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
Negotiators for the Los Angeles Herald Examiner and its 550 unionized workers reached a tentative contract agreement Monday morning after a 17-hour bargaining session. Officials of the Graphic Communications International Union and the newspaper declined to provide details on the pact pending a ratification vote by Herald Examiner workers scheduled for 8 a.m. today.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Researcher
William Randolph Hearst founded the Los Angeles Examiner in 1903, in order to assist his campaign for the presidential nomination on the Democratic ticket and to complement his San Francisco Examiner. Over the years a series of changes involving two other Los Angeles dailies--including two mergers--took place, culminating with the creation of the Hearst chain's Los AngelesHerald Examiner in January, 1962.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They record all variety of events unfolding in every sort of place, but inevitably newspapers leave behind their own stories too. Beneath the smudges of ink and through the yellowing pages, newspapers make their own history. And when a newspaper passes, journalists grieve. The community--their community--is unalterably changed. And in their minds, reduced. Something romantic is lost. The civic pulse grows weaker.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | CHARISSE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 1 p.m. Wednesday, Robert J. Danzig, vice president of Hearst Corp., walked into the Herald Examiner city room. Dressed in a dark suit, he climbed atop a copy editor's desk. He stood silent for a moment, a piece of paper in his hand. A nervous buzz that had prevailed in the newsroom stopped. Reporters, photographers and editors gathered around the desk and waited to hear what Danzig, a stranger from New York, had come to tell them.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | JUDY PASTERNAK and THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles Herald Examiner, strapped with declining circulation and shrinking revenues, announced Wednesday that it will cease publication as of today, closing out a 118-year history that provided Los Angeles with some of its richest journalistic lore. Robert J. Danzig, Hearst vice president and general manager of the company's newspapers, stood on a desk Wednesday in the Herald's newsroom and broke the news in a brief statement to the assembled staff.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1989
The Dodgers believe in nonviolence. They won't hit anything. GEORGE W. FEINSTEIN Altadena
BUSINESS
March 10, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE and PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writers
The owner of the Toronto Sun, a saucy Canadian tabloid heavy on pictures and crime stories, confirmed Thursday that it is exploring the purchase of the Los Angeles Herald Examiner. Toronto Sun Publishing Corp. stressed that its discussions with Hearst Corp., the media giant that owns the Herald, were exploratory. "There are no ongoing discussions," said John Rowsone, executive assistant to President J. Douglas Creighton. "At this point, it is all quite premature."
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | CHARISSE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 1 p.m. Wednesday, Robert J. Danzig, vice president of Hearst Corp., walked into the Herald Examiner city room. Dressed in a dark suit, he climbed atop a copy editor's desk. He stood silent for a moment, a piece of paper in his hand. A nervous buzz that had prevailed in the newsroom stopped. Reporters, photographers and editors gathered around the desk and waited to hear what Danzig, a stranger from New York, had come to tell them.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN
An open-air art festival featuring works by 16 Southern California painters, music and food will be held today through Sunday at the Stary Sheets Fine Art Galleries in Old Town Irvine. Among the artists whose work will be shown are two cartoonists whose strips were syndicated nationally: Karl Hubenthal, editorial cartoonist for the defunct Los Angeles Herald Examiner newspaper, and Roger Armstrong, who created "The Flintstones" and "Little Lulu."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
Negotiators for the Los Angeles Herald Examiner and its 550 unionized workers reached a tentative contract agreement Monday morning after a 17-hour bargaining session. Officials of the Graphic Communications International Union and the newspaper declined to provide details on the pact pending a ratification vote by Herald Examiner workers scheduled for 8 a.m. today.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|