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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1994
Releasing final audits of the 1993 mayoral campaign, the costliest in Los Angeles history, the city Ethics Commission Thursday found Mayor Richard Riordan and his opponent, former Councilman Michael Woo, received several thousand of dollars in contributions in excess of legal limits. Overall, however, the reviews concluded that both candidates substantially complied with tougher election laws enacted after the ethics controversies in the latter years of former Mayor Tom Bradley's Administration.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 1992
Adelyn (Ade) Banks, a former newspaper columnist and city editor, has died at a Burbank hospital. She was 64. A longtime Burbank resident, Ms. Banks died Thursday of complications of heart and lung disease, said longtime friend Jim Bacon. Born in Hull, Iowa, she began her newspaper career as a teen-ager on the weekly Burbank News.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2000
Long before the term "multicultural" became popular in Los Angeles, Boyle Heights was the city's melting pot. Today, the Eastside area contains only fading remnants of the Jewish, Japanese, Italian and Russian communities that once shared the area with Mexican families, who are still there. But the Japanese American National Museum is launching a two-year project to preserve the ethnic history of the 120-year-old community, and it is calling on former and current Boyle Heights residents to help.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2000 | Cecilia Rasmussen
St. Vincent's Medical Center is Los Angeles' oldest hospital and, in the midst of its sprawling, palm-dotted campus, sits a six-story building, home to the Daughters of Charity, the families of out-of-town patients and the only history center and museum of its kind in the West. What began five years ago as Sister Helen Carmody's personal rescue of dumpster-bound memorabilia is now a 3,000-square-foot repository, research center and museum that encompasses the history of medicine in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Central Avenue: a long thoroughfare slicing through East Los Angeles from East 1st Street on the north to Del Amo on the south. Not much to look at these days, it was at one time one of America's most legendary cultural arenas. It belongs, first of all, on any short list of America's most vital jazz mainsprings.
NEWS
January 18, 1998 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood, which gave Southern California its glamorous image around the world, is rapidly moving from supporting player to star of the region's economy on the strength of exploding global demand for its movies, TV shows and new entertainment technologies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1997 | STEPHEN BYRD
In a 1990 televised tribute on "American Playhouse," Sanford Meisner expressed a simple and concise definition of acting. "Acting is doing," he told a student. "Meaningful acting is doing under emotional circumstances." An original member of the renowned Group Theatre collective in New York during the 1930s, Meisner was for more than 50 years considered by theater and film experts one of the country's top acting teachers, part of a circle that included Lee Strasberg, Stella Adler and Elia Kazan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1999 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before the Santa Monica Freeway was built, before the start of World War II and even before the Los Angeles River was paved, Mateo was a closely knit neighborhood of mostly Mexican immigrants, thriving in the southeast corner of downtown Los Angeles. To outsiders, Mateo--named for the street that ran through it--was an unattractive part of Los Angeles' industrial and warehouse district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1999 | Cecilia Rasmussen
He was a rich 19th century Don Juan. She was the last woman he wronged. She killed him with a single shot through the eye, delivered in broad daylight alongside a busy road in downtown Los Angeles. But what really convulsed respectable residents of the community was what followed: a trial in which her defense attorneys presented 12 male jurors with forensic evidence and expert scientific testimony that their client should be acquitted by reason of "menstrual madness."
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