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NEWS
May 27, 1990 | MARY LOU LOPER
Those 500th anniversaries are rare. Try to outdo Christopher Columbus. His quincentenary will be the topic at a reception Thursday at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion of the Music Center. Talk will focus on the international tall ship Parade of Sail that will escort the three Columbus replica caravels--the Nina, Pinta and Santa Maria--into the Port of Long Beach on Sept. 27, 1992. Los Angeles County Supervisors Peter F. Schabarum, Kenneth Hahn, Edmund D. Edelman, Deane Dana and Michael D.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2009 | HECTOR TOBAR
Imagine we could dismantle the skyscrapers on Bunker Hill and step back in time to the downtown Los Angeles that was. In place of soaring glass and steel, we find the squat wood frames of Victorian mansions and humble clapboard apartments hugging old palm trees. Studebakers and Fords with bulbous bodies and chrome ornaments glide down the streets, guzzling gas. Just about everyone smokes, including the down-on-his luck writer gazing out from his room at the Alta Loma Hotel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2000
Long before the term "multicultural" became popular in Los Angeles, Boyle Heights was the city's melting pot. Today, the Eastside area contains only fading remnants of the Jewish, Japanese, Italian and Russian communities that once shared the area with Mexican families, who are still there. But the Japanese American National Museum is launching a two-year project to preserve the ethnic history of the 120-year-old community, and it is calling on former and current Boyle Heights residents to help.
NEWS
May 23, 1991 | LEO SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Phantom of the Opera" will become the longest running musical in Los Angeles history with its 839th show a week from tonight at the the Ahmanson Theatre. And it owes some of its success to two dancers who got their first taste of show business in Ventura County. In fact, the two cast members, Irene Cho and Mary Alyce Laubacher, attended the Oxnard School of Ballet together as pre-teens and quickly became best friends.
MAGAZINE
November 7, 2004 | RUSS PARSONS, Russ Parsons is a columnist with The Times' Food section.
As far as I'm concerned, Miss Alice Warmbath has a lot to answer for. It was on the occasion of her marriage to Juan Bautista Martino that the first recorded brunch in Los Angeles history was given on Friday, Feb. 18, 1927. That makes her the spiritual parent to oceans of cheap champagne and pasty hollandaise, overcooked eggs floating on rafts of soggy bacon and, when it's all totaled up, centuries--no, millenniums--of forced conviviality.
NEWS
December 28, 1990 | TRACY WILKINSON and JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gilbert W. Lindsay, the flamboyant political figure who worked his way up from the cotton fields of Mississippi to become the first black politician on the Los Angeles City Council, died early today. Lindsay, who helped shape the emergence of downtown Los Angeles as a major metropolitan center, was 90. Left speechless and nearly motionless by a massive stroke Sept. 2, Lindsay died shortly after 2 a.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1993 | CHARLES FISHER, Former president, Highland Park Historical Society, Los Angeles
The Los Angeles City Council has voted to start the process of changing the name of one of our major streets to honor the late Cesar Chavez. As a lifelong resident and historian of Los Angeles, I am delighted and dismayed with this plan. I am delighted because of Chavez's contribution to our society. He is emblematic of the spirit that has built our country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2000
For more than 14 months, the case of Javier Francisco Ovando remained unresolved; it was the first and perhaps most shocking element of the Los Angeles Police Department's Rampart Division scandal. Today, Ovando saw justice in the form of a $15-million settlement from the city. It was in September 1999 that Police Chief Bernard C.
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