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Los Angeles Holocaust Monument

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2005 | Patricia Ward Biederman, Times Staff Writer
Sixty years after the liberation of the Nazi death camps, some 2,000 people, many of them schoolchildren, gathered Thursday in Los Angeles's Pan Pacific Park to mark Holocaust Remembrance Day. As with other recent Holocaust memorials, Thursday's was suffused with a sad urgency as the Jewish victims who survived the death camps dwindle in number. Nathan Shapell, 83, an Auschwitz survivor who helped build the Holocaust monument at the park, said Holocaust programs are a must.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2010 | By Mike Anton
Two decades ago, they numbered in the hundreds. On Sunday, there were just a few dozen. But when Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa asked them to stand and be recognized, the Holocaust survivors in attendance for the annual Holocaust Remembrance Day at Pan Pacific Park in Los Angeles were met with a standing ovation. "We ask you to stand up because of your courage, your perseverance and your memories," Villaraigosa said. "We honor you today because those memories of yours will make sure that this will never, ever happen again."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2010 | By Mike Anton
Two decades ago, they numbered in the hundreds. On Sunday, there were just a few dozen. But when Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa asked them to stand and be recognized, the Holocaust survivors in attendance for the annual Holocaust Remembrance Day at Pan Pacific Park in Los Angeles were met with a standing ovation. "We ask you to stand up because of your courage, your perseverance and your memories," Villaraigosa said. "We honor you today because those memories of yours will make sure that this will never, ever happen again."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2005 | Patricia Ward Biederman, Times Staff Writer
Sixty years after the liberation of the Nazi death camps, some 2,000 people, many of them schoolchildren, gathered Thursday in Los Angeles's Pan Pacific Park to mark Holocaust Remembrance Day. As with other recent Holocaust memorials, Thursday's was suffused with a sad urgency as the Jewish victims who survived the death camps dwindle in number. Nathan Shapell, 83, an Auschwitz survivor who helped build the Holocaust monument at the park, said Holocaust programs are a must.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1991 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 165,000-square-foot domed granite-and-glass structure has risen on Pico Boulevard in Los Angeles next to the Simon Wiesenthal Center. Less than three miles away, workers soon will be installing exhibits in a converted bank office alongside the Jewish Federation Council headquarters on Wilshire Boulevard. And just 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1994
In response to "When Will Jews Let It Rest?" by Rabbi Eli Hecht, Commentary, Jan. 2: As a survivor of the Auschwitz death camp, a presidential appointee to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum Council, and one of a handful of benefactors of the Los Angeles Holocaust Monument in Pan Pacific Park, I believe I am qualified to respond to Rabbi Hecht's column. Clearly Rabbi Hecht does not have the slightest understanding of why Jews--and all people--must understand the horrors of the Holocaust and never, ever forget it. The resounding message of every museum and monument which has been erected in memory of the Holocaust is not, as Hecht states, that "the world is never a safe place for Jews."
NEWS
April 22, 1993
More than 2,000 people gathered Sunday at the Holocaust Memorial in Pan Pacific Park for a ceremony to mark the 50th anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising. Coming one day after the announcement of the verdicts in the federal Rodney G. King beating trial, the event was held under tight security, but it passed without incident.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2008 | Ari B. Bloomekatz, Times Staff Writer
The phrases "never again" and "we must not remain silent" are themes of Holocaust Remembrance Day, and speakers at Sunday's commemoration in Pan Pacific Park reminded listeners of those messages. "On Yom Hashoah we come together to say 'never again.' Seventy years after Krystallnacht, we must make sure that those words are a promise," Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said. "Silence is never an acceptable response."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2006 | Carla Rivera, Times Staff Writer
For Jona Goldrich, even the most painful moments in human events have much to teach future generations. And so this survivor of the Holocaust has become a chronicler of the past, to ensure that the suffering of his family and his people are never forgotten. "I'm obsessed with the Holocaust," Goldrich says. "This is something that happened only 66 years ago, and the next time it might not be the Jews."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2008 | Paloma Esquivel, Times Staff Writer
The letters are simple, full of gratitude and overflowing with history. "Zane, I received your letter of May 21 on June 13," wrote Sonia, an 89-year-old Ukrainian Holocaust survivor. "I also received the gelt [money] -- thank you very much to everyone." She continued, "During the war, our family was evacuated to far Siberia. We lived through cruel deprivations; hungry, naked and barefoot we returned home after Kiev was liberated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1994
In response to "When Will Jews Let It Rest?" by Rabbi Eli Hecht, Commentary, Jan. 2: As a survivor of the Auschwitz death camp, a presidential appointee to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum Council, and one of a handful of benefactors of the Los Angeles Holocaust Monument in Pan Pacific Park, I believe I am qualified to respond to Rabbi Hecht's column. Clearly Rabbi Hecht does not have the slightest understanding of why Jews--and all people--must understand the horrors of the Holocaust and never, ever forget it. The resounding message of every museum and monument which has been erected in memory of the Holocaust is not, as Hecht states, that "the world is never a safe place for Jews."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1991 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 165,000-square-foot domed granite-and-glass structure has risen on Pico Boulevard in Los Angeles next to the Simon Wiesenthal Center. Less than three miles away, workers soon will be installing exhibits in a converted bank office alongside the Jewish Federation Council headquarters on Wilshire Boulevard. And just 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2007 | Claire Noland, Times Staff Writer
Joseph Young, an artist who created dozens of sculptures, glass mosaic murals and cast-concrete bas-reliefs in Los Angeles and is best known for his controversial Triforium public artwork at the Civic Center, has died. He was 87. A resident of West Hollywood since 1952, Young died Thursday of pneumonia at Brotman Medical Center in Culver City, his widow, Millicent Young, said Saturday. He had overcome lung cancer several years ago, she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1994 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The tiny white-haired woman in the navy-blue pantsuit was greeted with smiles and tears as she made her way, supported by two rabbis, toward the menorah-shaped monument at the Museum of Tolerance, where she lit a flame to remember the 6 million Jews killed during the Holocaust. "Let me touch you," said one woman as she reached out to embrace Emilie Schindler, who as the wife of Oskar Schindler helped save more than 1,100 Jews during World War II.
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