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Los Angeles Homeless Service Authority

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1996
For the first time since it was established in 1994, the Los Angeles Homeless Service Authority will hold its monthly commission meeting in the San Fernando Valley. The San Fernando Valley Homeless Coalition, which represents more than 70 Valley organizations, will host the meeting Thursday at the Pacoima Community Service Center. The Los Angeles authority is run jointly by the city of Los Angeles and the county, providing funding for nonprofit groups offering direct services to the homeless.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1996
For the first time since it was established in 1994, the Los Angeles Homeless Service Authority will hold its monthly commission meeting in the San Fernando Valley. The San Fernando Valley Homeless Coalition, which represents more than 70 Valley organizations, will host the meeting Thursday at the Pacoima Community Service Center. The Los Angeles authority is run jointly by the city of Los Angeles and the county, providing funding for nonprofit groups offering direct services to the homeless.
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NEWS
May 21, 1995 | MARILYN MARTINEZ
The Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority Commission has approved the allocation of $11.65 million in federal funds to create services for Los Angeles' homeless population, part of a $20-million three-year grant called the Los Angeles Homeless Initiative. "I think it's going to make a visible difference [for the homeless] in L.A. County as these services come on line," said Eugene Boutilier, executive director of the Los Angeles Homeless Service Authority, a year-old joint city-county agency.
NEWS
June 12, 1996 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bundled in a purple jacket, a plaid scarf secured around her neck, 36-year-old Lynne stands on a corner across from the Northridge Fashion Center, holding a plea scripted neatly on cardboard: "Family in Need, Please Help." By 6 p.m. she has received snide comments and a bag of Doritos. What she wants is money--money she claims she will use to keep the Department of Water and Power from shutting off her service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1995 | MARILYN MARTINEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The plans are big, and surprisingly, the money is there to back it up. With an infusion of at least $3 million in federal money to operate services for the homeless in South-Central Los Angeles, government officials hope to create a network of services in the sprawling community. Each night, an estimated 14,000 homeless can be found in South-Central, a number too great for the small, underfunded agencies in the area to serve.
NEWS
June 12, 1996 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bundled in a purple jacket, a plaid scarf secured around her neck, 36-year-old Lynne stands on a corner across from the Northridge Fashion Center, holding a plea scripted neatly on cardboard: "Family in Need, Please Help." By 6 p.m. she has received snide comments and a bag of Doritos. What she wants is money--money she claims she will use to keep the Department of Water and Power from shutting off her service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1996
Hoping to obtain more money for homeless services in the San Fernando Valley, about 40 activists and heads of social service organizations on Monday presented their funding priorities to representatives of the Los Angeles Homeless Service Authority. It is the city-county umbrella agency that last year administered the county's $71 million in Housing and Urban Development funds for homeless services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1995
The two gazebos looked like little houses, with their wood shingle roofs and open windows overlooking the sea. So the homeless of San Pedro moved in, much to the consternation of Los Angeles officials who did not fancy using the gazebos of Plaza Park as ersatz homeless shelters. "They were never intended to be a home. They were intended to be respites," said Barry Glickman, chief of staff for Los Angeles City Councilman Rudy Svorinich Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1996 | KATE FOLMAR
Hoping to obtain more money for homeless services in the San Fernando Valley, about 40 activists and heads of social service organizations presented their funding priorities Monday before representatives of the Los Angeles Homeless Service Authority. LAHSA is the city-county umbrella agency that last year administered the county's $71 million in Housing and Urban Development funds for homeless services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1995 | MARILYN MARTINEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The plans are big, and surprisingly, the money is there to back it up. With an infusion of at least $3 million in federal money to operate services for the homeless in South-Central Los Angeles, government officials hope to create a network of services in the sprawling community. Each night, an estimated 14,000 homeless can be found in South-Central, a number too great for the small, underfunded agencies in the area to serve.
NEWS
May 21, 1995 | MARILYN MARTINEZ
The Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority Commission has approved the allocation of $11.65 million in federal funds to create services for Los Angeles' homeless population, part of a $20-million three-year grant called the Los Angeles Homeless Initiative. "I think it's going to make a visible difference [for the homeless] in L.A. County as these services come on line," said Eugene Boutilier, executive director of the Los Angeles Homeless Service Authority, a year-old joint city-county agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1996 | DARRELL SATZMAN
For the first time since it was established in 1994, the Los Angeles Homeless Service Authority (LAHSA) will hold its monthly commission meeting in the San Fernando Valley. The San Fernando Valley Homeless Coalition, which represents more than 70 Valley organizations, will host the meeting Thursday at the Pacoima Community Service Center.
NEWS
October 30, 1994 | LESLIE BERESTEIN
After two years of fires, shootings, drug activity, transient squatting, an ongoing lawsuit against the owners by the state and innumerable headaches to neighboring residents and merchants, the abandoned building once known as the "Hope House" at 843 S. Bonnie Brae Street has finally met the wrecking ball. Demolition crews worked to tear down the three-story, 22-unit structure last week, formerly a halfway house for indigent adults.
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