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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2004 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
Immigration officials launched an Internet-based appointment system Wednesday that they hope will virtually eliminate the long lines and hours of waiting typical at most Southern California immigration offices. The new service, called InfoPass, is available for scheduling appointments in the downtown Los Angeles, Santa Ana and San Bernardino offices of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. It is not available for offices in Ventura, East Los Angeles or El Monte.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2011 | David Zahniser
A Los Angeles City Council panel voted Tuesday to recommend a contract worth up to $97.5 million for a company with 9,000 employees in Arizona, drawing complaints that such a move would violate the city's boycott of the state. The council's Energy and Environment Committee backed a 15-year agreement with Honeywell International despite opposition from Councilman Ed Reyes, a co-author of the Arizona ban. L.A.'s boycott was approved last year to protest Senate Bill 1070, the Arizona law cracking down on illegal immigration.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2003 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
Eleven-year-old Diana Cabrera is a straight-A honors student, hits top scores on statewide achievement tests and has never missed a day of class. The Los Angeles native studies as much as six hours a day. "She's the smartest student I've had in 30 years of teaching," said JoAnn Burdi, who teaches Diana and other gifted sixth-grade students at Bell Gardens Intermediate School, which serves low-income, mostly Latino families east of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2009 | Anna Gorman
A former immigration consultant was sentenced to 10 years in state prison Tuesday for bilking more than 100 clients out of money in exchange for false promises of legal status, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office announced. A Superior Court judge also ordered Romina Aida Zadorian, 39, to pay nearly $900,000 to the victims she had defrauded. From 2003 to 2008, Zadorian pretended to be an attorney for an immigration consulting business in Montebello and told clients she could help them obtain residency, citizenship and work permits.
NEWS
July 4, 1998 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles' Jewish community--the third-largest in the world--now numbers just over 519,000, with steady migration from around the nation and the world offsetting a relatively low birthrate, according to the first census of the area's Jewish population in nearly two decades. While migration has helped keep the area's Jewish population steady since the late 1970s, the Jewish community's center of gravity has increasingly moved westward over the past 20 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1991 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nikolai Ogorodnikov, a diminutive Soviet from Kiev, was a principal in the sensational spy case of former FBI agent Richard W. Miller, and served five years in prison for his part in the scandal. Not surprisingly, the federal government wanted to deport Ogorodnikov, a legal resident since 1977. The process was halted by a judge's order last year only so he would be available to testify at Miller's trial. In the meantime, Ogorodnikov got out of prison and became a hero. While working a $6.
NEWS
January 22, 1989 | RICK HOLGUIN, Times Staff Writer
The man on the phone sounded desperate. He had been working at a factory for 13 years but had not been promoted because, he suspected, he is Latino. What should he do? Moments before, an exasperated woman had called seeking help in collecting $1,000 from her former landlord, money that was borrowed more than a year ago. Neither caller spoke English. The director of Centro de Proteccion Familiar (Center for Family Protection) scheduled appointments to work on solutions to their problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1986 | PATRICK McDONNELL, Times Staff Writer
The ink was barely dry on the new immigration bill when the advertisements began appearing in Spanish-language media in Southern California. To the area's large illegal alien population, the message was clear: You had better act quickly to qualify for the long-awaited "amnesty"--the provision of the new law under which some undocumented immigrants can legalize their status in the United States. "Don't wait any longer!" warned one notice. "Put your papers in order."
NEWS
July 20, 1989 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
The nation's top immigration court appellate official participated three years ago on a then-secret government committee that shaped plans to apprehend and deport alien terrorists, according to recently declassified government documents. The lawyer for a group of Los Angeles-area immigrants fighting deportation, Marc Van Der Hout, charged Wednesday that it was "a clear conflict of interest" for the official to serve on a policy-making panel while supervising the immigration courts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1998 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles' Jewish community--the third-largest in the world--now numbers just over 519,000, with steady migration from around the nation and the world offsetting a relatively low birthrate, according to the first new census of the area's Jewish population in nearly two decades. While migration has helped keep the Jewish population steady since the late 1970s, the Jewish community's center of gravity has increasingly moved westward over the past 20 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2004 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
Immigration officials launched an Internet-based appointment system Wednesday that they hope will virtually eliminate the long lines and hours of waiting typical at most Southern California immigration offices. The new service, called InfoPass, is available for scheduling appointments in the downtown Los Angeles, Santa Ana and San Bernardino offices of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. It is not available for offices in Ventura, East Los Angeles or El Monte.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2003 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
Eleven-year-old Diana Cabrera is a straight-A honors student, hits top scores on statewide achievement tests and has never missed a day of class. The Los Angeles native studies as much as six hours a day. "She's the smartest student I've had in 30 years of teaching," said JoAnn Burdi, who teaches Diana and other gifted sixth-grade students at Bell Gardens Intermediate School, which serves low-income, mostly Latino families east of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1998 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles' Jewish community--the third-largest in the world--now numbers just over 519,000, with steady migration from around the nation and the world offsetting a relatively low birthrate, according to the first new census of the area's Jewish population in nearly two decades. While migration has helped keep the Jewish population steady since the late 1970s, the Jewish community's center of gravity has increasingly moved westward over the past 20 years.
NEWS
July 4, 1998 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles' Jewish community--the third-largest in the world--now numbers just over 519,000, with steady migration from around the nation and the world offsetting a relatively low birthrate, according to the first census of the area's Jewish population in nearly two decades. While migration has helped keep the area's Jewish population steady since the late 1970s, the Jewish community's center of gravity has increasingly moved westward over the past 20 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as demand for citizenship soars to new heights, federal authorities say time-consuming safeguards imposed in response to congressional criticism will result in more than one-third fewer new Americans taking the oath in the Los Angeles area this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1995
Community groups Thursday urged tens of thousands of El Salvadoran immigrants residing in the Los Angeles area to file prompt applications for political asylum if they fear persecution back in their homeland. Many may otherwise face deportation after years in the United States. "We are very concerned, because if they leave this until the last minute they'll lose the opportunity," said Carlos H. Vaquerano of the Central American Resource Center.
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the display window of her Heliotrope Drive studio at the eastern edge of Hollywood, clothing designer Jocelyn Winship displays bright African tribal-print fabric along with her own silk-screened T-shirts that read Nkosi Sikela i Africa. Translation: God Bless Africa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as demand for citizenship soars to new heights, federal authorities say time-consuming safeguards imposed in response to congressional criticism will result in more than one-third fewer new Americans taking the oath in the Los Angeles area this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1995 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vowing vigorous enforcement of the only aspects of Proposition 187 in effect, Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Gil Garcetti pledged Thursday to seek prison terms for anyone who violates the new laws against the use, manufacture, distribution and sale of false documents to conceal citizenship or immigration status.
NEWS
November 6, 1994 | Reporting this story were Times staff writers Efrain Hernandez Jr., Diane Seo and Yvette Cabrera, and correspondents Leslie Berestein, Enrique Lavin, Mary Anne Perez and Simon Romero. It was written by Hernandez
The young men selling fake identification documents at MacArthur Park are looking forward to a boom season, thanks to Proposition 187. A couple of miles away, at H. Claude Hudson Comprehensive Health Center in South-Central, officials are worried. Staff members may be required to spend their time and resources trying to determine whether their patients are U.S. citizens.
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