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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1998 | Associated Press
Former television evangelist Jim Bakker, forced by scandal a decade ago to leave the Praise the Lord ministry he ran with his former wife Tammy Faye, is planning to remarry. Bakker and Lori Beth Graham met while she was addressing a Los Angeles women's group. "I fell in love first with her heart, the way she cares for people. Then I fell madly in love with her," said Bakker. "I am overjoyed that the love was mutual and that Lori Beth has agreed to be my wife."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1997 | JOE MOZINGO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The old Queen of Angels Hospital, a Los Angeles landmark that has loomed for decades high above its ramshackle Echo Park neighborhood, has been quietly taken over by the largest Assembly of God congregation in the nation and converted into a large-scale ministry for the urban poor. The 14-story building, now owned by a Phoenix megachurch, has become a church and a wide-ranging social service complex over the last two years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1998
The Los Angeles International Church, which said it feeds more than 1,500 people a day at its facility in the former Queen of Angels Hospital, announced Wednesday that it will start delivering 500 bags of food daily to needy families. "Only a few blocks from our headquarters is unbelievable poverty which escapes the attention of most people in Los Angeles," said Matthew Barnett, the church's 24-year-old pastor.
NEWS
October 30, 1998 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A woman in a dark beret sashays toward the president, who is entranced. World affairs take a back seat as they start making out on a desk. This may be the only place in the country where the saga of Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky has been unfolding every weekend since Oct. 16. It's Hell House, a Halloween haunted house attraction run by the Abundant Life Christian Center of suburban Denver.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1996 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's almost axiomatic that for evangelistic rallies, you erect the largest tent or book the biggest ballpark, then promote the heck out of the crusade to bring in the biggest possible crowds. But evangelist Greg Laurie's soul-seeking sessions Sunday through Wednesday at the Universal Amphitheatre have had a unusually low-key buildup--reflecting the facility's mere 6,100 seats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2000 | ANNETTE KONDO and RICHARD WINTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Scores of volunteers fanned out in downtown Los Angeles to deliver toys and gifts to needy families. Procrastinators crowded into busy stores and malls and complained about the stress of last-minute shopping. And for others, Saturday brought the tastes and smells of the annual food fest to come. The holiday countdown was on throughout the day as shoppers, do-gooders and cooks alike prepared for Christmas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2000 | ANNETTE KONDO and RICHARD WINTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For thousands of downtown residents, it was the joy of an early Christmas after volunteers delivered toys and gifts to needy families Saturday. At busy stores and malls, it was the shopping stress that procrastinators both seem to thrive on and complain about. And for many, Saturday ushered in the pre-Christmas tastes and smells of preparing for annual family food fests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2001 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the surprise announcement Sunday that the two pastors at the Echo Park temple started by revivalist Aimee Semple McPherson have resigned, a bitter fight to save the building's historic interior appears to be over. Pastors Ed and Ivy Stanton are leaving after two years marked by bitter squabbles over the future of Angelus Temple, a building with national historic landmark status that serves as the headquarters for the International Foursquare Gospel denomination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1998 | ROBERT A. JONES
Every city has its mysteries. You can live in a city for many years and then turn a corner one day and find yourself confronted with the unexpected. Somehow, some way, the urban equation has shifted. A movie theater has become a bookstore. People wearing turbans have settled into an old karate studio. A neon glow begins appearing in the window of an abandoned warehouse. You wonder, who plugged in the neon? What are the turban wearers doing? Is this good news or bad?
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