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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2006 | Jim Newton, Times Staff Writer
Four hotel workers -- a cook from the Radisson, a housekeeper from the Sheraton, a telephone operator from the Westin and a laundry worker from the Hilton -- gathered on a recent afternoon in a small Lennox apartment near LAX. Together, they make $409 a day, less than a single decent City Hall lobbyist can earn in an hour.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2012 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
Two dragons danced around a vacant storefront on the edge of Chinatown, stirring up dust. The centuries-old Chinese ceremony was meant to bring good luck - somethingWal-Mart, which had brought in the performers to celebrate the beginning of construction on a controversial new downtown Los Angeles grocery store - seemed to need. As a crowd of about two dozen local residents nibbled free cake and Wal-Mart executives exchanged auspicious offerings with local business leaders, several uninvited guests weaved through the crowd.
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NEWS
September 6, 1999 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years into a historic push to organize the region's multiethnic work force, Los Angeles labor unions have begun to see results, adding more than 85,000 members this year alone and building a network of political and community allies that is paying off in new laws and public support. Perhaps more than anywhere in the nation, unions here have embraced the more aggressive, sophisticated approach to organizing promoted by AFL-CIO President John J. Sweeney.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2009 | David Zahniser
Giving a victory to several public employee unions, a panel of Los Angeles pension board members agreed Tuesday to give city officials the maximum amount of time to pay off the cost of an early retirement plan seen as pivotal to erasing a $530-million budget shortfall. In a 2-1 vote, the pension committee ignored the advice of its top executive and recommended that the cost of early retirement be repaid over 15 years. Sally Choi, who heads the Los Angeles City Employees' Retirement System, had argued that a five-year payment schedule would be the most fiscally prudent strategy for the early retirement plan, which would allow 2,400 workers to leave up to five years ahead of schedule with full benefits.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1999 | Nancy Cleeland
About 300 Los Angeles labor leaders and rank-and-file activists, from dock workers to film production crews, will join thousands of union protesters in Seattle today to mark the opening of the World Trade Organization summit. Miguel Contreras, head of the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, which represents about 700,000 union members, said the labor contingent is asking trade ministers to incorporate "enforceable worker rights and protections" into future accords.
NEWS
January 10, 1998 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerry F. Cremins, president for 11 years of the California Building and Construction Trades Council and an influential figure in the state's Democratic Party, is dead at age 63. Cremins died in Sacramento on Monday after a long illness. At the peak of his power in the 1980s and early 1990s, he was the chief labor spokesman for 450,000 construction workers throughout the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2000 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nickel separating janitors and contractors could become a rallying cry for organized labor in Los Angeles, which is pouring money and resources into the nearly 3-week-old strike. About $118,000 was raised from 76 union leaders Thursday night at an emergency meeting called by the County Federation of Labor. Most of those leaders promised to provide help on picket lines and to turn out members at a rally planned for downtown Los Angeles Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1988 | PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writer
For Los Angeles, 1988 was a year at the flash point, a volatile period in which spectacular fires and senseless street-gang gunfire dominated the headlines. The most stunning single news event was probably the May 4 blaze that threatened to turn the city's tallest skyscraper, the 62-story First Interstate Bank tower, into a colossal torch. Working feverishly, 275 firefighters quelled the flames within four hours.
NEWS
May 13, 2009 | Harold Meyerson, Harold Meyerson is editor-at-large of the American Prospect and a columnist for the Washington Post.
Over the last few months, the American labor movement has faced a new and terrible threat -- from within. Fierce internecine fighting among a number of national unions has threatened to destroy carefully built coalitions and distracted the movement at a time when it can't afford to lose focus. The battle has been centered in New York and Washington, where the national unions are headquartered. But the city where it could do the most harm is Los Angeles.
NEWS
May 13, 2009 | Harold Meyerson, Harold Meyerson is editor-at-large of the American Prospect and a columnist for the Washington Post.
Over the last few months, the American labor movement has faced a new and terrible threat -- from within. Fierce internecine fighting among a number of national unions has threatened to destroy carefully built coalitions and distracted the movement at a time when it can't afford to lose focus. The battle has been centered in New York and Washington, where the national unions are headquartered. But the city where it could do the most harm is Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2008 | David Zahniser, Times Staff Writer
A Superior Court judge has struck down a 2005 law passed by the Los Angeles City Council that barred large supermarkets from taking over a store and immediately firing all its workers, an industry group said Tuesday. The ruling was a victory for the California Grocers Assn., one of several business groups that have filed challenges against initiatives backed by the Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy, a pro-labor nonprofit that pushed the supermarket ordinance. The alliance, which focuses heavily on bringing higher wages and greater benefits to low-income workers, has served as a driving force behind a variety of decision-making at City Hall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2006 | Jim Newton, Times Staff Writer
Four hotel workers -- a cook from the Radisson, a housekeeper from the Sheraton, a telephone operator from the Westin and a laundry worker from the Hilton -- gathered on a recent afternoon in a small Lennox apartment near LAX. Together, they make $409 a day, less than a single decent City Hall lobbyist can earn in an hour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2005 | Noam N. Levey, Times Staff Writer
Martin Ludlow had been crisscrossing Los Angeles to get voters to the polls since 4:45 a.m. when he took the stage at a downtown ballroom late Tuesday. But the leader of the powerful Los Angeles County Federation of Labor held nothing back as he whipped up union members celebrating the election-day shellacking of Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. "Elections are won by the people who turn out to vote, and we turned out the people to vote!"
BUSINESS
May 10, 2005 | Nancy Cleeland, Times Staff Writer
Organized labor in Los Angeles was in the doldrums last summer after a long, high-profile supermarket strike ended in humiliating defeat. Making matters worse, prominent reformers in the national labor movement were calling for the elimination of regional councils like the one headed by local union chief Miguel Contreras. It would have been a fine time for the top officer of the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor to go on the defensive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2005 | Matea Gold and Monte Morin, Times Staff Writers
Miguel Contreras, the son of migrant farmworkers who grew to be one of Los Angeles' most powerful labor leaders and a dominant force in city politics, died late Friday evening of an apparent heart attack. He was 52. Contreras, who worked the arid fields of the Central Valley as a boy, re-energized a sputtering Southern California labor movement struggling to regain relevancy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2005 | Noam N. Levey, Times Staff Writer
Martin Ludlow had been crisscrossing Los Angeles to get voters to the polls since 4:45 a.m. when he took the stage at a downtown ballroom late Tuesday. But the leader of the powerful Los Angeles County Federation of Labor held nothing back as he whipped up union members celebrating the election-day shellacking of Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. "Elections are won by the people who turn out to vote, and we turned out the people to vote!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2005 | Matea Gold and Monte Morin, Times Staff Writers
Miguel Contreras, the son of migrant farmworkers who grew to be one of Los Angeles' most powerful labor leaders and a dominant force in city politics, died late Friday evening of an apparent heart attack. He was 52. Contreras, who worked the arid fields of the Central Valley as a boy, re-energized a sputtering Southern California labor movement struggling to regain relevancy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2000 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An exuberant, overflow crowd of 20,000 clamored for a new amnesty for undocumented workers Saturday at a labor-sponsored forum that showcased a new and formidable alliance among unions and religious and community groups. "This is going to affect policy and politics in Los Angeles for years to come," said Miguel Contreras, secretary-treasurer of the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2000 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nickel separating janitors and contractors could become a rallying cry for organized labor in Los Angeles, which is pouring money and resources into the nearly 3-week-old strike. About $118,000 was raised from 76 union leaders Thursday night at an emergency meeting called by the County Federation of Labor. Most of those leaders promised to provide help on picket lines and to turn out members at a rally planned for downtown Los Angeles Tuesday.
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