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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1994 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN
Back when Los Angeles' new neighborhoods really did look like a TV sitcom set, housewives who really did wear shirtwaist dresses listened daily for the two-note whistle of the Helms man, who meandered the streets in a bright yellow and blue truck. For 38 years, the whistle announced the arrival of the more than 300 trucks that crisscrossed Los Angeles, delivering cream puffs, jelly doughnuts, breads and cakes to thousands of homes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2008 | From a Times Staff Writer
Roy G. Johnston, a structural engineer and seismic expert whose firm, Brandow & Johnston Associates, helped design such landmarks as the Los Angeles Sports Arena, the Los Angeles Convention Center, the Transamerica Tower and much of the USC campus, died of natural causes March 13 at his home in Santa Barbara. He was 94. Johnston and his partner, the late George E. Brandow, founded their structural and civil engineering firm in 1945.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1998 | Cecilia Rasmussen
For more than half a century, it was a musty pugilistic monument--preserved in liniment and sweat--where generations of Los Angeles prizefighters learned the lessons of "the sweet science." The Main Street Gym, on the edge of skid row, was the rattiest workout venue in the city (some said the world), but it also was the most famous. "World Rated Boxers Train Here Daily" read a sign at the entrance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2005 | Patricia Ward Biederman, Times Staff Writer
The Church of the Epiphany in Lincoln Heights would warrant city monument status if only because it is the oldest Episcopal church in Los Angeles. Built in 1887 and expanded in 1917, the Romanesque Revival chapel and adjoining main church in the English Gothic Revival style make up one of the city's oldest surviving religious structures, preservationists say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1988 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, Times Staff Writer
Danny Uwnawich, an Elvis Presley look-alike, was standing outside the house he is building in Northridge recently when a motorist drove by, leaned out his window and shouted, "All right! It's true!" Indeed Elvis lives, at least in spirit. Consider the house Uwnawich has under construction: an estimated $1-million scaled-down facsimile of Presley's famous Graceland mansion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1994 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN and Source: Los Angeles Conservancy
1. CHATSWORTH COMMUNITY CHURCH (1903) * Oakwood Memorial Park 22601 Lassen St. Chatsworth The oldest Protestant church in the San Fernando Valley sits on a cemetery knoll. It features a picturesque bell tower and classic New England church architecture. It originally stood at Topanga Boulevard near Devonshire Street and Western film stars Roy Rogers and Dale Evans were active members in the 1940s and 1950s.
NEWS
March 4, 1994 | TIM KAWAKAMI
Here are some key dates in the life of the Olympic Auditorium, which will reopen Saturday. * 1924: Jack Doyle, with the help of the Los Angeles Olympic committee for the 1932 Games, builds the Olympic Auditorium. Boxing great Jack Dempsey is on hand for the dedication. * Jan. 13, 1925: The first major card is a Jan. 13, 1925, flyweight bout in which Jimmy McLarnin takes a 10-round decision over Fidel LaBarba.
NEWS
February 12, 1993
Paul J. McCarty, 67, retired principal architect for the city of Los Angeles whose responsibilities over a 34-year municipal career included the restoration of Frank Lloyd Wright's Hollyhock House in Barnsdall Park. McCarty, who was honored by and belonged to most of the architectural organizations in the state, created a unique intern program in the architectural division of the city's Board of Public Works that has been copied by other municipalities.
REAL ESTATE
March 19, 1989 | Sam Hall Kaplan
Ruthann Lehrer, who has been in the forefront of the continuing battles to preserve Los Angeles landmarks, is taking her concerns, and energy, to Long Beach as its new neighborhood and historic preservation officer. In nearly a decade as executive director of the Los Angeles Conservancy, Lehrer guided the group from a small band fighting to save the Central Library to nearly 5,000 members involved in a range of architecture and urban design issues.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1991 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawry's California Center, a Los Angeles attraction for the past 30 years, will close on Jan. 3, yet another Southland culinary landmark to fall during the recent recession. Its cost-conscious owner, Thomas J. Lipton Co. of Englewood Cliffs, N.J., said Monday that the closure of the 17-acre site northeast of Dodger Stadium is part of a companywide consolidation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2001 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Watts Towers, a Los Angeles icon of modern art, reopened Friday after a seven-year, $1.9-million seismic retrofitting and restoration after the Northridge earthquake. A lighting ceremony and speeches by Mayor James K. Hahn and other dignitaries marked the reopening Friday, with community festivals planned for the weekend. The spiraling towers will be open for half-hourly tours six days a week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2001 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few ever think about the great wars, the soldiers, the turning points of history. The ranks of the heroes are thinning out. The dead of Normandy and Okinawa and Guadalcanal are becoming scarcely more than names on old plaques. Patriotic Hall is fading, too. It is a dim and musty relic, a monument to veterans that was the tallest building in Los Angeles when it opened in 1926.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2001 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"You ask for chicken feet and most stores say, 'No, no, no,' " butcher Nato Gutierrez declares, but his gleaming meat counter in Grand Central Market is not like most stores. Fresh chicken feet, at $1.79 a pound, are displayed alongside other hard-to-find delicacies: cabeza de puerco (pork head), cabeza de chivo (lamb head), honeycomb tripe, pork neck bone, rolled pork skin, beef feet--skinless and skin-on--and rabbit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2001 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Friends tell her to travel--go to Paris, see Rome, enjoy her life. But Judy Cairns has got her cats, maybe 100 of them, feral cats she feeds every afternoon from the back of her battered station wagon, a 1989 Ford with no grille and a bumper and headlight lashed on with pieces of cord. People call her eccentric. OK, she'll plead guilty to that. Cairns sees things in a different way than most others do. Her wagon pulls up outside Warehouse No.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2001 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge has denied a request to halt construction of a new elliptical music shell to replace the existing white dome over Hollywood Bowl's performance stage. Groups that want to preserve the existing shell as a historic landmark--Hollywood Heritage and the Friends of the Santa Monica Mountains Parks and Seashore--say they plan to appeal the decision.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2001 | BRAD BERTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Texas real estate investment group is set to purchase a landmark downtown Los Angeles high-rise in partnership with local landlord Hertz Investment Group, according to sources close to the negotiations. An affiliate of Dallas-based Skyrise Properties is under contract to purchase Union Bank Plaza for about $89 million, knowledgeable sources confirm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1998 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a marinara sauce spooned over pasta, the word spread slowly Wednesday through the noontime lunch crowd filling the cozy banquettes and tables at Little Joe's. After 101 years of helping feed Los Angeles, the famed Italian restaurant in the middle of Chinatown announced that it is closing. "This is awful, just awful," moaned Neil Olsen, who has dined at Little Joe's since 1936--when he was a 5-year-old who regularly accompanied his parents for spaghetti dinners.
REAL ESTATE
May 31, 1987
Two Los Angeles landmarks, along with broadcasting and baseball magnate Gene Autry, will be honored by the Los Angeles City Headquarters Assn. on Thursday for their contributions to the city. Autry, owner of the California Angels and chairman of Golden West Broadcasters, will receive the "Spirit of Los Angeles" award.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2001 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family of Leon Praport, an 83-year-old Holocaust survivor who died last month in the Angels Flight crash, will file a lawsuit against the city and private firms involved in restoring and operating the historic funicular, an attorney announced Thursday. Lawyer Gary A. Dordick said the suit, also being filed on behalf of Praport's wife, Lola, who survived the Feb. 1 crash, will seek a judgment compelling the city to restore Angels Flight to full service with new, safe equipment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2001 | CARLA RIVERA
Sometimes much good can bloom from inauspicious beginnings. So it was when the women of Alpha Gamma Omega went looking for a home for their burgeoning Los Angeles sorority, more than 40 years ago. They gazed with envy at the beautiful old houses on USC's sorority row, but there was a problem. The AGO women were black, a chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha, the first sorority in the nation founded by African American women.
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