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BUSINESS
May 14, 1990 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
The attraction for most of the 1,800 foreign companies that have set up manufacturing plants in Mexico is the cheap cost of labor. But a growing number of Southern California furniture makers hear another siren call: more lenient environmental laws. During the past two to three years, at least 40 Southern California furniture makers have relocated or made plans to open plants, called maquiladoras, in the Tijuana area, a migration that is still gathering steam.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2013 | By Mark Z. Barabak
For political roadkill, Gray Davis sounds awfully chipper these days. After decades spent in methodical, often joyless pursuit of higher office, the man who won the governor's office in 1998 was ousted in a recall election that was equal parts carnival and runaway train. He has the distinction of being only the second governor in U.S. history tossed from office midterm. More painful still, Davis' ouster came less than a year after he had scraped his way to reelection. Regrets?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1990 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Valet parking attendants, take note. Faced with a surge in complaints from citizens, Los Angeles officials have stepped up their inspection of valet parking services at some of the city's trendiest restaurants--and many are found to be breaking the law. In fact, if city ordinances governing valet parking were enforced to the letter of the law, most services would have to make major changes in how they park cars, or shut altogether, officials said Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2012 | By Amy Kaufman, Ben Fritz and Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
Law enforcement officials plan to continue an undercover presence in Los Angeles-area movie theaters through at least Sunday, as"The Dark Knight Rises"opened to a very strong $249 million worldwide. There was only one reported incident this past weekend after police were posted in local theaters in an effort to reduce anxiety and prevent copycat crimes following Friday's massacre at a showing of the third film in   Christopher Nolan's Batman franchise in Colorado. A man waiting for the superhero film to begin at an AMC theater in Norwalk was arrested Sunday after fellow patrons reported that he became agitated and said, "I should go off like in Colorado," sheriff's deputies said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1997
Dueling versions of aggressive anti-panhandling laws appeared at Los Angeles City Hall late Friday, as politicians scrambled to jump on a popular issue less than three months before they face the voters April 8.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1995 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One day after Los Angeles City Councilman Nate Holden was cleared of sexually harassing a receptionist, two of his colleagues announced plans to tighten procedures for reporting misconduct by elected officials and top managers. Ruth Galanter and Jackie Goldberg, two of the council's four female members, refused to talk specifically about the Holden case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1997
Calling it a 1st Amendment horror show, lawyers for the American Civil Liberties Union asked a federal district court Friday to block enforcement of Los Angeles' tough new panhandling law. The civil rights group argued that the ordinance, adopted by the City Council on July 2 and signed into law by Mayor Richard Riordan, violates constitutional guarantees of free speech.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1993
A Los Angeles city commissioner's law firm has been awarded $70,000 in legal fees by a Los Angeles Superior Court judge, who found that the firm had helped to right constitutional inadequacies in the city's ethics law. The money was awarded by Judge David Yaffe to a law firm in which city Library Commissioner Doug Ring is a partner, a reward for the legal challenge that the firm led against a law that required broad disclosure of city officials' personal finances.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1990
Mayor Tom Bradley on Friday signed into law an ordinance creating a city Housing Preservation and Production Department and a Commission on Affordable Housing. The mayor's office announced earlier that the department would be formed so the city's housing programs could be centralized into a single agency with a mandate to analyze the affordable housing crisis and implement programs to provide more housing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1990 | TRACY WOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Councilwoman Ruth Galanter on Friday proposed a new city law prohibiting the employees of elected Los Angeles officials from raising campaign contributions for their bosses from anyone with business pending before the city. Galanter aide Rick Ruiz said the proposed ordinance was expected to be approved by the full council, in part because most of it simply restates existing law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2011 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday unanimously approved an ordinance to limit commercial selling on Venice Beach's famed Ocean Front Walk. The ordinance is the latest in a series of efforts to tame the popular but unruly attraction, which draws about 16 million visitors annually but has lately seen more than the usual number of transients and violent crimes. The city's earlier attempt to impose a lottery and permitting system for the western side of the boardwalk was blocked in October 2010 by a federal court on the grounds that it violated the 1st Amendment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2009 | Phil Willon
A court commissioner has nixed a Los Angeles law that cracked down on how long taco trucks and other food coaches could stay open up for business. The ordinance, approved by the City Council in 2006, forced operators to stay on the go: Trucks were prohibited from parking in the same spot in a residential neighborhood for more than half an hour or in a commercial area for more than an hour. A similar law adopted by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors was tossed out by a judge last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2008 | From a Times Staff Writer
Edwin Leroy "Roy" Tolles, a distinguished lawyer and founding partner of the Los Angeles firm now known as Munger, Tolles & Olson, has died, his firm announced. He was 85. Tolles, who had been in failing health for several months, died of heart failure Monday at Stanford Hospital in Palo Alto. He had recently been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. The firm began with seven lawyers in 1962 and is now a nationally regarded company with more than 200 lawyers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2001 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles Police Commission panel called on the LAPD on Thursday to correct shortcomings in its operating manual to make sure officers do not stop people solely to check their immigration status. At issue is Special Order 40, a 1979 directive that was passed to prohibit such conduct but, according to the panel, was never fully incorporated into the Police Department manual.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stymied in attempts to ban gas-powered leaf blowers, the Los Angeles City Council on Friday voted to spend another $1.6 million to bring to commercial markets battery-operated blowers as an alternative to noisier, exhaust-spewing models. The city Department of Water and Power has worked for a year with AeroVironment Inc., which developed the prototype of a zero-emission electric blower that runs on batteries. The city has spent about $300,000 on the program to date.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1997
Calling it a 1st Amendment horror show, lawyers for the American Civil Liberties Union asked a federal district court Friday to block enforcement of Los Angeles' tough new panhandling law. The civil rights group argued that the ordinance, adopted by the City Council on July 2 and signed into law by Mayor Richard Riordan, violates constitutional guarantees of free speech.
NEWS
July 23, 1991 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one can hold Los Angeles Police Chief Daryl F. Gates to his promise that he will retire next April, the city attorney's office said Monday. "It's nothing but a gesture without legal implications," said Assistant City Atty. Siegfried Hillmer, who advises the city Board of Pension Commissioners. "Just to say I want to retire sometime in 1992 is like to say I want to go fishing in 1992."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1991 | RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley received more than $25,000 worth of free movie and sports passes, clothing, travel and other gifts last year--an $8,000 increase over 1989, a new public report showed Friday. The gifts were received in a year in which a City Hall ethics scandal prompted major voter-approved political reforms, including restrictions that will prohibit many such perks beginning this year.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Daytime crime in Los Angeles has dropped a dramatic 20% to 45% in categories including burglary, shoplifting and car break-ins two years after a tough anti-truancy law was passed by the City Council, according to new statistics prepared by the Los Angeles Police Department.
NEWS
June 5, 1997 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Daytime crime in Los Angeles has dropped a dramatic 20% to 45% in categories including burglary, shoplifting and car break-ins two years after a tough anti-truancy law was passed by the City Council, according to new statistics prepared by the Los Angeles Police Department.
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