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Los Angeles Manufacturing Action Project

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1994 | MARY HELEN BERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Labor leaders hope to target hundreds of thousands of immigrant industrial workers along the Alameda Corridor in a massive campaign they say would transform union organizing in Los Angeles. Never before in Los Angeles--and rarely elsewhere--have organizers attempted to create a regionwide, multi-union drive targeting entire industries, said Peter Olney, coordinator of the Los Angeles Manufacturing Action Project (LAMAP) and a longtime labor organizer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1994 | MARY HELEN BERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Labor leaders hope to target hundreds of thousands of immigrant industrial workers along the Alameda Corridor in a massive campaign they say would transform union organizing in Los Angeles. Never before in Los Angeles--and rarely elsewhere--have organizers attempted to create a regionwide, multi-union drive targeting entire industries, said Peter Olney, coordinator of the Los Angeles Manufacturing Action Project (LAMAP) and a longtime labor organizer.
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BUSINESS
September 19, 1996 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Delivery truck drivers for Southern California's largest tortilla maker approved a new contract late Wednesday, ending a six-week strike against the Guerrero tortilla brand. The strike was not large, involving only about 160 drivers, but it grabbed headlines and the attention of politicians, and was touted as a symbol of a resurgent labor movement.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1996 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What will the outcome of the fierce election battle between Ron Carey and James P. Hoffa for the helm of the Teamsters union mean for California? It could mean plenty. Carey, the incumbent and narrow favorite to win the contest, has been a major proponent of the type of grass-roots and multi-union organizing campaigns championed by the insurgents who took control of the national AFL-CIO last year.
NEWS
February 17, 1997 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just last spring, a daring surprise strike by thousands of Latino immigrant truckers on the Los Angeles-Long Beach waterfront collapsed in a humiliating defeat, marking another in a series of failed union-organizing efforts by the port drivers. So what are these truckers doing now? Lining up by the hundreds to attend more monthly union meetings. In fact, as many as 1,200 of these poorly paid drivers already have started chipping in dues of $9.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1996 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sun is setting on one of the American labor movement's dearest traditions: the AFL-CIO's annual winter bash along the beachfront here in balmy south Florida. This week's gathering marks the end of nearly 60 consecutive years of get-togethers at Miami-area resorts to conduct union--and monkey--business. For Teamsters from Toledo and steelworkers from Scranton eager to escape the cold, the news isn't all bad.
NEWS
December 15, 1996 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Teamster leader Ron Carey emerged as the apparent winner Saturday in his bid for reelection as president of the nation's biggest private-sector union, beating back a fierce challenge from James P. Hoffa, the son of the legendary Teamster chief who mysteriously disappeared two decades ago. Official figures released late Saturday, with all of the nearly 440,000 eligible ballots counted, showed Carey with a 52%-48% lead, a margin amounting to nearly 16,700 votes.
BUSINESS
February 22, 1996 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bastions of union strength have long been such big Northern cities as New York, Detroit and Chicago, but America's labor activists are now focusing on a new metropolis: Los Angeles. Both among ground-level labor organizers and at the top ranks of the new regime running the AFL-CIO, Los Angeles is seen as possessing explosive potential for union growth. Among the big targets for organizing are the garment-making and food-processing industries.
NEWS
November 8, 1997 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite a high-profile campaign by the nation's top labor leaders over the past two years to revitalize America's unions, efforts to recruit new members have yet to pay off in a significant way. Soon-to-be-released federal figures show that union recruiting has risen only modestly during the government fiscal year that ended in September.
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