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Los Angeles Museum Of Contemporary Art

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October 22, 1991 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Los Angeles lost one of its most stalwart advocates of contemporary and modern art over the weekend when Marcia Simon Weisman died. Before her death of a stroke, at 73, she had spearheaded so many projects, inspired so many collectors, bought so many artworks and expressed so many opinions about art that she touched nearly everyone in the field. If you didn't know her as the visionary behind Los Angeles' Museum of Contemporary Art, you heard her appeals to support the museum.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Over the last three weeks, as the Museum of Contemporary Art has weathered an uproar over the resignation - some would say ouster - of its chief curator, Paul Schimmel, and the subsequent resignation of four internationally known artists from MOCA's board, one key person has been notably silent: Jeffrey Deitch, the museum's director. Until now. In a wide-ranging interview Friday afternoon at his Grand Avenue office, Deitch vigorously defended his two-year record of exhibitions and programming.
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NEWS
October 14, 1991 | Rick VanderKnyff and Zan Dubin
NEW KID IN TOWN: And then there's Paul Schimmel, who left Newport Harbor Art Museum 17 months ago to be chief curator for Los Angeles' Museum of Contemporary Art. He was captivated by the challenge of a museum with 20,000 more square feet of display space. Today he realizes that size presents its own problems: "A bigger ship is harder to turn."
IMAGE
September 19, 2010 | By Ellen Olivier, Special to the Los Angeles Times
At the first Salon by the Shore to benefit the Museum of Contemporary Art, museum director Jeffrey Deitch introduced internationally recognized artist Doug Aitken and offered some explanations for L.A.'s ability to create so many great artists. Among other considerations, he named the landscape, climate and intellectual foundation of the city. "We're so lucky to have all this," said event co-chairwoman Lilly Tartikoff Karatz. "At one end of the city we have a great contemporary art museum and then, at the other end, we have the Pacific Ocean.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1989
"My colleagues . . . are all moaning about the high prices for works of art and the changes in the tax laws that have had a great impact on museums and the building of collections. But I don't think it's totally negative. What does a museum do? It rethinks priorities. Where will it put its attention if this continues? On younger artists--a very good thing because the works are still reasonable in price." --Richard Koshalek, director of Los Angeles' Museum of Contemporary Art, in Artweek.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1988 | LEAH OLLMAN
Artists seeking their big break should prepare their slides for entry into the third annual Artists' Liaison competition. Organized by a Los Angeles group of the same name, the Artists' Liaison seeks "to promote both emerging and established artists," according to director Gene Fulmer.
NEWS
December 20, 1990 | LORI GRANGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some artists spend years trying to get their work on the market--longer, even, to see it displayed in a major museum. For five Highland Park fifth-graders, both happened almost overnight. Each of the Loreto Street School students spent two class periods in July designing Christmas card covers for the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1995 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
In an ambitious move to secure the future of its creative mission, Los Angeles' Museum of Contemporary Art has launched a $25-million fund-raising drive. Announcing the campaign on Thursday--with half of the money already pledged--MOCA Director Richard Koshalek said that most of the funds will go into an endowment to support the museum's programs. The move was inspired by an economic and political climate that has threatened arts funding for the past few years, Koshalek said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1991 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Los Angeles' Museum of Contemporary Art has acquired its first work by AndyWarhol, thanks to an anonymous donor. "Telephone," a 1961 oil painting based on a 1928 advertisement, was purchased from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts Inc. in New York. The museum declined to reveal the price of the 54 x 69 3/4-inch painting by the late Pop artist whose work has brought as much as $4 million at auction.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1990 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Heralding the holiday season and looking forward to a new year when income tax laws will once again encourage donations of artworks to museums, the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art has announced a major addition to its collection. "Map," a seminal painting by Jasper Johns, is a gift of Marcia Weisman, a founding director of the museum and a long-time art collector.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2008 | Mike Boehm, Boehm is a Times staff writer.
Los Angeles' prestigious but chronically underfunded Museum of Contemporary Art has fallen into crisis. Museum Director Jeremy Strick said MOCA is seeking large cash infusions from donors, and this week he did not rule out the possibility of merging with another institution or sharing its collection of almost 6,000 artworks. Federal tax returns show that even before the current national crisis, MOCA had been draining its reserves to pay operating expenses.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
A new name is going up at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's soon-to-open Broad Contemporary Art Museum. LACMA trustee Jane Nathanson and her husband, communication and investment mogul Marc Nathanson, will have a ground-floor gallery in the building named for them in recognition of a $10-million gift to the museum to be announced today. The donation is earmarked for contemporary art programs and acquisitions. "It's going to be one of the best spaces in the world to show contemporary art.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2007 | From a Times staff writer
The Murakami retrospective exhibition at MOCA's Geffen Contemporary has set new attendance records for MOCA with 15,705 attendees viewing the exhibition during its opening weekend and first-week events that began Oct. 27. The figures break the MOCA record previously held by "Ecstasy: In and About Altered States," seen by 6,045 visitors in 2005.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2007 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
In a move that seems sure to offend art world purists, the downtown Museum of Contemporary Art will merge the worlds of art and commerce this fall by including a fully operational Louis Vuitton boutique as part of a retrospective of the work of Japanese artist Takashi Murakami. Highlighting Murakami's longtime professional association with the luxury goods label, the boutique will offer limited-edition handbags and small leather goods featuring Murakami designs.
NEWS
May 31, 2007 | Alex Chun, Special to The Times
GETTING in on the booming contemporary art market can be a daunting endeavor, particularly for neophyte collectors. In response, the Museum of Contemporary Art has come up with "Fresh," a summer party and auction that offers a range of artwork from veterans such as Ed Ruscha, John Baldessari and Allen Ruppersberg as well as younger artists such as Violet Hopkins and Joe Bradley.
NEWS
March 22, 2007 | Diane Haithman
It's official: MOCA gets it first. Los Angeles artist Chris Burden's "Hell Gate," a 28-foot-long, 7 1/2 -foot-high model of New York City's Hell Gate Bridge fashioned of metal toy construction parts, will be installed Monday and Tuesday at the Museum of Contemporary Art in downtown L.A. in preparation for a show of recent acquisitions by L.A.-based artists that will open April 1.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2000 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Like most major art museums, Los Angeles' Museum of Contemporary Art gets a rush of art gifts at the end of each year, when collectors typically make tax-deductible contributions. It now appears that 1999 was a particularly good year for MOCA--and not only because of tax breaks. Of the 120 works added to the museum's collection last year, 17 pieces were donated in honor of Jeremy Strick, who succeeded director Richard Koshalek last July.
NEWS
March 9, 1999 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Jeremy Strick, curator of 20th century painting and sculpture at the Art Institute of Chicago, has been appointed director of Los Angeles' Museum of Contemporary Art. The announcement, made Monday after a meeting of the museum's board of trustees, is being viewed as a surprising move because it catapults a little-known curator into the top administrative position at one of the nation's highest-profile art institutions.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2007 | Suzanne Muchnic
"Robert Rauschenberg: Combines" -- an international traveling exhibition organized by Paul Schimmel, chief curator at L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art, and presented there last summer -- has won the International Assn. of Art Critics' 2005-06 award for the best monographic museum show nationally. Two other honorees will appear at MOCA this spring.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic
Audrey Irmas, a leading figure on the Museum of Contemporary Art's board of trustees since 1992, has been named a life trustee. A frequent donor of artworks and contributor to exhibitions, Irmas was co-chair of the museum's capital campaign in the mid-1990s. MOCA will announce her appointment next week as part of an annual changing of the guard, including the election of three new trustees. Investment advisor Arthur Bilger, Hard Rock Cafe founder Peter Morton and World Oil Corp.
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