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Los Angeles Office Of Parking Management

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1998 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the world of law enforcement, these officers do a job that people love to hate. Angry residents are quick to shout obscenities at them. Others take it upon themselves to dole out career advice by telling them to "get a real job." But for the city's more than 400 traffic officers, taking abuse from the public is just part of a day's work. "They feel it," said Mike Inouye, the city's parking administrator, who heads the Office of Parking Management.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1998 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the world of law enforcement, these officers do a job that people love to hate. Angry residents are quick to shout obscenities at them. Others take it upon themselves to dole out career advice by telling them to "get a real job." But for the city's more than 400 traffic officers, taking abuse from the public is just part of a day's work. "They feel it," said Mike Inouye, the city's parking administrator, who heads the Office of Parking Management.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1998 | KENNETH REICH
When we were bringing up our kids, I found myself frequently repeating a saying picked up down South. "Them's the breaks," it went, and the suggestion to the kids was: "This is the way it's got to be. So don't fight it, just accept it." It wasn't a sentiment we applied to things that had to be resisted, however intractable--real evils, like bigotry, for example. Usually, in a journalist's family, it was more like, "Dinner is going to be two hours late tonight."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1998 | SUSAN ABRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A collection of antique parking meters stands in rows inside the Los Angeles Department of Transportation's meter repair shop, images from the city's past. There is the original one-cent "Park-O-Meter" of the 1930s, next to the short-lived token dispenser "Golden Circle" of the 1970s. Several electronic meters from the '90s stand close by. The designs have changed, as have the prices--from an hour per nickel in the 1940s to a quarter for 12 minutes in the 1990s.
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