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ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2011 | By Marcia Adair, Special to the Los Angeles Times
? At first glance, it appears that basses get the short end of the stick in opera. Even if they've managed to avoid mugging as a comic foil for the lovesick tenor, they are too busy raging, possessing or controlling to ever get the girl. Asked if he wished he were a tenor so he could have a crack at being the hero, bass-of-the-moment René Pape let out a small Mephistophelian laugh before answering with a firm no. "Who wants that kind of pressure?" It's just as well. Pape's intensity and total approach to singing and stagecraft are much better suited to the strong-but-flawed characters he plays as a bass.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2000
Mark Swed's May 21 articles on Peter Hemmings and Los Angeles Opera provided well-merited coverage of a man and an institution that have changed the cultural landscape of Southern California. One aspect that Swed touched on but did not praise sufficiently is the company's commitment to developing young local artists. This is a mission Los Angeles Opera shares with the Opera Buffs Inc., which provides scholarships and performance opportunity to young singers in Southern California. Swed suggests that other companies have "stronger personalities" than Los Angeles Opera.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
Tara Glynn Colburn, major benefactor and founding board member of the Los Angeles Opera at its inception in 1986, has died at the age of 61. Colburn died Friday of cancer in Geneva, Los Angeles Opera officials said. As a part of her philanthropy, Colburn underwrote the recent production of "The Barber of Seville" at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion and was a co-sponsor of the production of "Madama Butterfly" planned for next season.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2010 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
At one time, Los Angeles was Weimar on the Pacific: Numerous German-speaking émigrés put their stamp on the city to which they'd fled. What with directors such as Billy Wilder and Ernst Lubitsch, writers such as Thomas Mann and Bertolt Brecht, and assorted film composers and actors — many of whom gathered to express their love of German high culture and their hatred of fascism — it seemed at times that the Southland's intellectual life...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
With its show-business staging of Mozart's "The Magic Flute" as a cheekily animated silent movie, Los Angeles Opera on Saturday night got what it very much needs. That this will be a hit goes without saying. But what this once pioneering company really needs right now is a reason to be talked about again. So let's talk about Barrie Kosky, one of the hot directors on the international scene and, like most hot directors on the international scene, ignored in America. Not too many American opera companies dare hire directors who put buckets of excrement onstage, as Kosky did in a recent German production of Janácek's "From the House of the Dead.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
The start of fire season and opera season in Los Angeles often coincide. It's weird - a scheduling remnant from the days when the Los Angeles Opera and Los Angeles Philharmonic shared the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion and bickered over dates - but it works. The late-summer air is hot and dry, toxic with smoke. People are on edge. Sensitivities are heightened. Emotions flare. Jerks cut you off on the freeway. That's neither an improper apocalyptic atmosphere nor apoplectic state in which to receive opera.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
Dorothy Forman, an arts philanthropist and leading supporter of Los Angeles Opera, has died. She was 90. Forman died Sunday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, according to a statement from the opera company. The cause of death was not announced. Forman's philanthropic support for opera in Los Angeles began in the 1970s, when she joined the board of the Music Center Opera Assn. In 1985, she pledged a substantial amount to the association's successor organization, Los Angeles Opera.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2002
"Artists and repertoire subject to change. No refunds or exchanges" reads the fine print on the Los Angeles Opera advertisement on Page 49 in the Aug. 11 Calendar. I ask you, would you put down money on next year's car knowing that the make, model and options would be subject to change, no refunds or exchanges? I do not think so. So why buy tickets in advance to the Los Angeles Opera? You have no choice of seating by phone or mail order, so best seat is not an option. Indeed, because they never really sell out, some of the best tickets are at the box office the night of performance.
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